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livining in the mid-east and shipping the ingredients

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Greeting all- ex-pat from Tennessee, living in the middle east... and it's 118 degrees today. There is no alcohol here (in public) and I would really like a beer with my shuwarma... so here is the question- has anyone ever shipped the  necessary ingredients to the middle east?  if so- how did you do it?  Never brewed before so there are lots of first here.  Thanks

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First off, it would depend upon which Middle Eastern country you are living in. Purchasing online directly from Mr. Beer, they may or may not be able to ship to that country. Even if you had a local US purchaser buy the product for you, and ship it to your country, some Middle Eastern countries (Muslim in religious flavor I would guess) have import customs rather hostile to contraband (illegal narcotic drugs, etc.). If the production, sale, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages is actually illegal in the country, I would suppose you may run the risk of having a beer kit, or even extracts and yeasts seized at customs inspection if the customs inspectors were to understand what they are and their intended purpose. At the worst, in some countries that may lead to a visit from their secret, or worse, religious police, etc.

Having said that, if this country's prohibitions about alcohol are more cultural than actually legal, there is still the matter of time and temperature. Cans of extract may not be as sensitive to heat in the short term, but yeasts can be. Depending on how much you are willing to pay for shipping, and therefore how fast it gets to you, you may be able to get the product to you in a moderately timely fashion, the only problem would then be protecting temperature sensitive items from excessive heat. Keeping those items from going over 80 degrees Fahrenheit for any prolonged period of time may help with maintaining yeast viability. An insulated container of some sort, coupled with possibly some cooling may help. Ice packs may melt too quickly, dry ice may be TOO cold (and may run into shipping restrictions?)

Next, if you actually can get your kit and supplies to you in good condition, you still must deal with providing a fermenting area that can be kept between 68 and 76 degrees Fahrenheit, although many veteran posters here will recommend a temperature range significantly lower than the high of 76 for clean fermentations with less potential for off flavors. Presuming you are able to brew pretty much as soon as you get your yeast, you must still plan to have access to a fermentation environment 76 or below for about 3 weeks, and a conditioning environment at the worst in the mid 80's for at least additional 4 weeks every time you want to brew beer. In addition, unless you are planning to drink 2 gallons right away, you really should plan to store your beer below 80 degrees for the longer term. Unless you have access to the equivalent of a cool dark place, you may not be able to ferment or condition your beer well without developing nasty things like fusel alcohols, and you may have to end up drinking them young and somewhat green.

There is significant discussion of the ice pack in a cooler with the fermenter method of keeping your fermenting wort from overheating, but in your location that may be too much work. If you can get an external temperature controller, and plug it into a fridge, you may be able to attach the temperature probe to your fermenter and control your ferment in that manner. You may also do the same thing with your conditioning beer, by taping the probe lead to one of your conditioning bottles in the center of the bunch in the fridge.

Having said that, I am new here, and new to brewing, so I may have said something wrong, and will therefore be corrected by someone in this forum who is more experienced shortly.

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1 LBK: Empty (for the moment)

10.5 740ml Amber PET Bottles: Classic American Light brewed 6/10, bottled 7/3, carbonating until 7/31.

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I just got a like on the first version of my last post from RickBeer, one of the more astoundingly knowledgeable brewers on these forums. However editing the posting to its final form on my cell phone took about 20 minutes, so everyone might want to read it again (just see if I managed to screw it up

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Sorry, I'm going to have to retract that like - I just saw in your signature (not visible on my tablet) that you have an empty LBK.  For crimes against humanity I cannot "like" you.   :lol:

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Sorry, I'm going to have to retract that like - I just saw in your signature (not visible on my tablet) that you have an empty LBK. For crimes against humanity I cannot "like" you. :lol:

I just wrote an awesome long post on my cell phone, accidentally drug down on the screen refreshing the page, and wiped out the whole dumb thing.

The short of it is, I was using a Costco cooler bag to keep my fermenter from overheating, I am now using that bag to store my bottles while they condition, some of them are overfilled, the trub bottle has no trub after cold crashing, but since I sampled too much of the flat beer, it's only half full but has two carb drops in it. It's only been one day and the bottles are already somewhat firm. I'm keeping the bag zipped shut in case I end up with a bottle bomb blowing a cap off.

Crimes against beer are worse.

Without another cooler bag, I don't dare to brew the Belgian Spiced Christmas Ale in this heat. Even using refrigerated water, I won't be able to keep the wort temp down and I will probably end up with high krausen blowing out the airlock vent notches and making an awful mess everywhere. So it's off to Costco tomorrow to buy another cooler bag for $6?, break out the Blue Ice freezer packs, and brew that Belgian monster.

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1 LBK: Empty (for the moment)

10.5 740ml Amber PET Bottles: Classic American Light brewed 6/10, cold crashed 7/1, bottled 7/3, carbonating until 7/31.

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Wow- that's a lot to cycle thru.... was actually bring ingredients in separately so that there was never all the stuff in a package.  and it is actually illegal- not just culturally.  Storing in a cool place is not a problem, AC in my apartment can maintain 70 ( been testing it).  Guess I'm going to have to think about temps during shipping... if can't control it I have to find another way around it.  I now have lots to think about, and a lot more to read.  Thank for the input, greatly appreciated!

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