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I'm about to attempt a bourbon barrel aged stout.  I'm using the Shameless Stout recipe.  I plan to soak oak chips in Maker's Mark and drop a cup full into the wort in a hop bag, then bottle condition with more chips in flavor infusers.

 

My question is, do you guys think this is overkill?  About right?  Maybe lose the flavor infusers?  I'm going to sample the wort for flavor when I take my FG reading.

 

Thx

 

GREG

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Oak chips are VERY strong when it comes to oaking beer or wine. More so than cubes or spirals. I don't see any need to add oak to the bottles. This will overwhelm what should be a subtle flavor. You should get plenty of oak and whiskey flavor with the 1 cup of soaked chips. Remember that toasted chips will give more flavor than untoasted.

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Oak chips are VERY strong when it comes to oaking beer or wine. More so than cubes or spirals. I don't see any need to add oak to the bottles. This will overwhelm what should be a subtle flavor. You should get plenty of oak and whiskey flavor with the 1 cup of soaked chips. Remember that toasted chips will give more flavor than untoasted.

Ok, so toasted. Would you add them to the wort immediately or after one week?

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Ok, so toasted. Would you add them to the wort immediately or after one week?

 

Add after 1 week because you don't want the added whiskey to interfere with the primary brewing process. Then ferment for an additional 2 weeks.

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for a 5 gal chocolate milk stout... at 1 week + 4 days in the primary I took 2 ounces of toasted Hungarian oak cubes and let them sit one day in a mason jar covered with vodka.  I did this to draw out some initial tanins.  the next day I took the cacao nibs, put in a sanitized hop sack, threw out  the vodka and added the cubes. I put this in a bowl then covered with bourbon just enough to cover the bag.  let this soak for 2 days.  at the 2 weeks in the primary mark  I racked into a sanitized secondary with the bourbon and bag added....

.

I gave this 2 more weeks then bottled.  a week later I just tried a sample.  the chocolate is muted compared to the oak and bourbon.  it isn't bad.. it is just the chocolate took a back seat.  this was my first go at oak cubes and bourbon. it'll probably mellow out and age nicely but the chocolate I fear will always play second fiddle to the bourbon and cubes. the next time I will likely scale back the cubes in whatever batch I make with them to 1 ounce per 5 gallons.

 

oh and yeah... adding chips to bottles would be a bad idea.

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Oak in a chocolate milk stout just doesn't sound very appetizing. :wacko:

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I'm about to attempt a bourbon barrel aged stout.  I'm using the Shameless Stout recipe.  I plan to soak oak chips in Maker's Mark and drop a cup full into the wort in a hop bag, then bottle condition with more chips in flavor infusers.

 

My question is, do you guys think this is overkill?  About right?  Maybe lose the flavor infusers?  I'm going to sample the wort for flavor when I take my FG reading.

 

Thx

 

GREG

beware like Josh R said oak chips are very strong, i'm a witness to that, recently I brewed a bourbon oak cherry porter and went overboard with the bourbon oak, lose the infusers, if u use the whiskey soaked chips, I would research the amount u need for the LBK.

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for a 5 gal chocolate milk stout... at 1 week + 4 days in the primary I took 2 ounces of toasted Hungarian oak cubes and let them sit one day in a mason jar covered with vodka.  I did this to draw out some initial tanins.  the next day I took the cacao nibs, put in a sanitized hop sack, threw out  the vodka and added the cubes. I put this in a bowl then covered with bourbon just enough to cover the bag.  let this soak for 2 days.  at the 2 week in the primary I racked into a sanitized secondary with the bourbon and bag added....

.

I gave this 2 more weeks then bottled.  a week later I just tried a sample.  the chocolate is muted compared to the oak and bourbon.  it isn't bad.. it is just the chocolate took a back seat.  this was my first go at oak cubes and bourbon. it'll probably mellow out and age nicely but the chocolate I fear will always play second fiddle to the bourbon and cubes. the next time I will likely scale back the cubes in whatever batch I make with them to 1 ounce per 5 gallons.

 

oh and yeah... adding chips to bottles would be a bad idea.

I've done chocolate and coffee but not with oak. Anyway thanks for the tip. And I plan to age it until at least December.

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Add after 1 week because you don't want the added whiskey to interfere with the primary brewing process. Then ferment for an additional 2 weeks.

Yes, thanks, that confirms what I'm planning to do. I'm soaking them for about 3 days before adding to e LBK. I'd probably have fermented this for three weeks anyway, I tend to do that with any big beer.

Maybe use 3/4 cup?

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josh it was an experiment.  I figured I would play with the oak cubes now so I can learn how they impact flavor.  it's not horrible.. .it's just a little weird in the choc stout.  I really missed my target og for various reasons so I wasn't overly concerned about it coming out bad.

 

-z-

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Yes, thanks, that confirms what I'm planning to do. I'm soaking them for about 3 days before adding to e LBK. I'd probably have fermented this for three weeks anyway, I tend to do that with any big beer.

Maybe use 3/4 cup?

3/4 cup of what? I used about a half cup of bourbon soaked chips and i realized it was waaay too strong, if i do another porter like i have, and it'll be a 5 gal batch, ill do maybe 1/4 cup, also depends on what the individual tastes are as well. and thinking of aging in a whiskey barrel? I've got one for sale, haha! its a 55 gal. too big for what i want to do!

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3/4 cup of what? I used about a half cup of bourbon soaked chips and i realized it was waaay too strong, if i do another porter like i have, and it'll be a 5 gal batch, ill do maybe 1/4 cup, also depends on what the individual tastes are as well. and thinking of aging in a whiskey barrel? I've got one for sale, haha! its a 55 gal. too big for what i want to do!

So, you think one cup of soaked chips is too much for two gallons? How much would you recommend? I have a cup soaking but I don't have to use it all. I'm putting it in Saturday so if you see this please reply.

Thx for the feedback.

Ps to answer your question, 3/4 cup of bourbon-soaked toasted oak chips.

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Oak chips are VERY strong when it comes to oaking beer or wine. More so than cubes or spirals. I don't see any need to add oak to the bottles. This will overwhelm what should be a subtle flavor. You should get plenty of oak and whiskey flavor with the 1 cup of soaked chips. Remember that toasted chips will give more flavor than untoasted.

Josh, do you think one ounce would be about right for the LBK? From what I'm reading various places, guys use two ounces per five gal batch.

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probably soak about 1/4 cup of oak chips in a shot glass 3/4 full of whiskey in a closed jar for a week minimum, takes sum time for the whiskey to absorb into the chips. I let mine sit for a month before I started the batch, but in your case since you've already started brewing, i'd put it in on week two, then let brew two more weeks

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Josh, do you think one ounce would be about right for the LBK? From what I'm reading various places, guys use two ounces per five gal batch.

 

This sounds about right, but it also depends on what they're referring to. Be sure they are talking about oak chips and not cubes. But yes, you should be able to simply cut the recommendations for a 5 gallon batch in half when using an LBK.

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threw out  the vodka and ....

What noooo! Use it in a mixed drink or just as a shot.  :huh:

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bry.. not a huge fan of drinking tannin. or straight vodka for that matter... and an oaky tannin infested bloody mary doesn't sound appealing. 

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bry.. not a huge fan of drinking tannin. or straight vodka for that matter... and an oaky tannin infested bloody mary doesn't sound appealing. 

It might make an interesting vanilla martini

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bry.. not a huge fan of drinking tannin. or straight vodka for that matter... and an oaky tannin infested bloody mary doesn't sound appealing. 

i'd drink that if I was drunk

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lol... just bought a spicy hot bloody mary mixer. sometimes a man just needs to drink marinara sauce with vodka, ya know?

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never used to be a fan of bloody Mary's. . . thought they were a Thurston howell the 3rd snobby drink. thought they were silly... pasta sauce with vodka?  ... but something about a horseraddishy tomatoe-y mix with hot sauce and vodka really spices things up..  2 parts mix 1.5 parts vodka..sometimes.  curses though... I forgot the celery stick. of course my ulcers hated me but ive got insomnia lately so I self medicate as needed to sleep.  

 

it's my drink of choice when I don't have any 8-12% abv beer on hand.

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Ahh, "barrel" aging...  I've done a few of those.  I use cubes, which I agree are a bit more subtle/restrained.  The wee heavy (which I caramelized part of the wort and also brewed with heather tips) was quite outstanding (IIDSSM).  The brett saison is coming around after 1.5 years in the bottle.  As for bourbon barrel aged stouts commercially, be sure to seek out Blackstone Black Belle...  it's an imperial stout infused with cacao nibs and aged for 7+ months in Green Brier Distillery Belle Meade Bourbon barrels.  I personally think it holds up pretty well in comparison to BCBS and others.  Quite outstanding...  especially straight from the barrel...  nice to have friends in the right places   ;)

11018631_928960057138263_702586727926475

19940091305_15b8a8cfe0_z_d.jpg

11058419_938059679561634_837844272147156

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never used to be a fan of bloody Mary's. . . thought they were a Thurston howell the 3rd snobby drink. thought they were silly... pasta sauce with vodka?  ... but something about a horseraddishy tomatoe-y mix with hot sauce and vodka really spices things up..  2 parts mix 1.5 parts vodka..sometimes.  curses though... I forgot the celery stick. of course my ulcers hated me but ive got insomnia lately so I self medicate as needed to sleep.  

 

it's my drink of choice when I don't have any 8-12% abv beer on hand.

LOL!

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Bourbon is aged in new charred oak barrels. To get more of a bourbon barrel aged flavor, use some of the Jack Daniels chips that are available. They are chopped up used bourbon barrels people use for smoking. Use the bits that are charred.

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I used 1oz of heavy char French oak cubes soaked in 3oz Jameson Irish Whiskey in a 1 gallon (split batch) double American Porter recipe (which is really just a stout I guess). It is extremely oaky, burny, and aggressive... I love it. It'll put hair on your chest. It's about 6 months in the bottle and starting to mellow just a bit.

 

I also used about a cup of Medium toast American Oak chips soaked in 6 oz of Ancient Age Bourbon in a deluxe American Ale recipe, very oaky, but had very little carbonation. I think the extra alcohol of the bourbon may have interfered with the yeast during carbonation. Just a theory.

 

All additions were in a secondary vessel after a 2 week primary vessel.

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I make as killer Russian Imperial Stout.  I have a wood shop.  In that wood shop I have a stack of oak lumber AND a surface planer.  In my cupboard I have a bottle of Wild Turkey.

 

Guess what I'm making in a couple of weeks.

 

B) B) B)

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I make as killer Russian Imperial Stout.  I have a wood shop.  In that wood shop I have a stack of oak lumber AND a surface planer.  In my cupboard I have a bottle of Wild Turkey.

 

Guess what I'm making in a couple of weeks.

 

B) B) B)

I Know I'm putting the horse before the carriage here but I'm starting to get really excited about getting the brewery up and running again.  But anyway, here the label I made for my soon-to-be-brewed Bourbon Stout...

 

post-54332-0-34398600-1440625062_thumb.p

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Hmm, I am thinking about doing the bourbon/oak porter .  I was reading other sites talking about their recipes and they were soaking oak in 16 oz Whisky and adding IT ALL to the secondary for 2 weeks then bottling w/o the chips. Must have been a 5 gal recipe - that makes it 6-8 oz for the LBK.  The recipe used scotch ale yeast I guess to accommodate extra ABV.

 

So my thinking was the Porter HME, + a Smooth LME +  a Robust LME  ferment a week then add the chips/bourbon after letting them soak a few days and bottle at 3 weeks.

Maybe I would use S-04 instead of Mr B yeast?

Should I add another LME pack?  What kind ?

 

I just bottled the same thing but w/o the oak/bourbon and it tasted nicely dark and caramelly on bottling (standard yeast).

 

Thoughts?

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go easy on the bourbon chips, they're strong, I added about 5 little chips to my recent bottled winter dark ale during 2nd week fermentation, and just those few chips gave it a powerful bourbon oak taste.

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I make as killer Russian Imperial Stout.  I have a wood shop.  In that wood shop I have a stack of oak lumber AND a surface planer.  In my cupboard I have a bottle of Wild Turkey.

 

Guess what I'm making in a couple of weeks.

 

B) B) B)

I bottled this a couple of weeks ago.  At the bottling tasting I was rather disappointed in the lack of the bourbon flavor in the beer.  I don't know if it will come out in the conditioning or if I didn't add enough or if the already high ABV of the beer "covered" up the bourbon.  I'll let you know in four or five weeks.

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I really can't remember what bourbon I used, but it wasn't cheap, and I poured the entire contents into the 16 oz jar of half filled wood chips

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I used oak shavings as opposed to oak chips.  After soaking they had turned into almost a mush.  Maybe next time I'll get some chips.

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I have a WDA in the LBK that I added 1oz of med French oak chips to. I soaked them in 2oz of Makers Mark for 2wks, then added it all to the LBK @ 1wk. I'm about 11days into fermentation now, and I drew a sample. I have to say that I'm a little disappointed in the amount of oak flavor that I'm getting. Can I add more sanatized oak chips to this to increase the flavor or should I just leave it in the hopes of it increasing over the next 10 days?

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sure add another ounce and check it after a week. i did a porter this last summer with bourbon oak, but went over board with the chips, but just finished drinking my last WDA and i put about 5-6 chips in it plus poured a slight of the liquid from the jar it was soaking in, and i didn't used any hop sacks, just straight into the LBK. and for me, it was just the right touch

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as a matter of fact, my buddy text me tonight sayin he loved the bourbon oak WDA liter I gave him to try, and he's impossible to win over with my homebrew bcuz he always complains it's too sweet, but he liked this so much I may convince him in letting me set him up with a can of this to brew. he's one of three frnds I'm trying to get to brew mr. beer products. I have three co workers who want to give the mr. beer experience a try

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Just added another ounce of Medium French Chips. Hope that beefs up the flavor.

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Ahh, "barrel" aging...  I've done a few of those.  I use cubes, which I agree are a bit more subtle/restrained.  The wee heavy (which I caramelized part of the wort and also brewed with heather tips) was quite outstanding (IIDSSM).  The brett saison is coming around after 1.5 years in the bottle.  As for bourbon barrel aged stouts commercially, be sure to seek out Blackstone Black Belle...  it's an imperial stout infused with cacao nibs and aged for 7+ months in Green Brier Distillery Belle Meade Bourbon barrels.  I personally think it holds up pretty well in comparison to BCBS and others.  Quite outstanding...  especially straight from the barrel...  nice to have friends in the right places   ;)

11018631_928960057138263_702586727926475

19940091305_15b8a8cfe0_z_d.jpg

11058419_938059679561634_837844272147156

 I've had the honor of touring the distillery and tasting the Green Brier White whiskey, but they weren't sampling anything aged when we were there. Just happened to wonder by on a visit to Nashville last december, just a few weeks after they opened to the public.

 

Do you know Blackstone Black Belle is available outside the Nashville area?

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I did 1.25 oz soaked in a pint of bourbon for 30 days and really thought it came out nice after being added at bottling.  Personally I don't think 5-6 chips thrown in the lbk will do much of anything.

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I've got a 55 gallon whiskey barrel I bought this last spring that stilled had some whiskey in it. give it away if someone comes and haul it off, it weighs 110 lbs empty.....​

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I have had great results with soaking 1 oz of oak cubes in 4 oz of bourbon for 2 weeks and then pouring the cubes and bourbon in the fermenter for the last (3rd) week. I have done this with Pale Ales, Porters and Stouts. Just recently used Honey Bourbon in a Pale Ale and a Porter. The Pale Ale is very good, but the Porter is awesome.

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14 hours ago, docpd said:

I have had great results with soaking 1 oz of oak cubes in 4 oz of bourbon for 2 weeks and then pouring the cubes and bourbon in the fermenter for the last (3rd) week. I have done this with Pale Ales, Porters and Stouts. Just recently used Honey Bourbon in a Pale Ale and a Porter. The Pale Ale is very good, but the Porter is awesome.

Doc, could you give me some more information on your recipe for the honey bourbon porter?  Thanks in advance! 

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when I did my wild-n-wacky Vanilla Bourbon Cherry Porter early last spring 2015, I kinda went over board with the medium oak chips soaked in whiskey, and put too many in the last week of the primary. one of my friends that liked it said they were taking shots lol! Wow! it was just a little crazy for this crazy guy

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