Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Kevin Caffrey

muslin hop sack open in lbk?

Recommended Posts

I brewed Horse's Ass today and tonight when looking in the lbk, it looks like the pellet hops came out of the hop sack? Is this normal? If not, is there anything I can do to salvage the beer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The beer is not ruined, no worries. I throw all my hops in "commando" and they settle out in the trub. Cold-crash your beers to clear them even further, and naked hops are not a problem at all.

 

 :)

 

 #hopsgocommando

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I brewed Horse's Ass today and tonight when looking in the lbk, it looks like the pellet hops came out of the hop sack? Is this normal? If not, is there anything I can do to salvage the beer?

 

How can you tell your hopsack came open in your LBK?  I can't see through the dark brown plastic of the LBK well enough to see much details of anything.  And it's generally not a good idea to be opening the top of your LBK to look inside during fermentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The beer is not ruined, no worries. I throw all my hops in "commando" and they settle out in the trub. Cold-crash your beers to clear them even further, and naked hops are not a problem at all.

 

  :)

 

 #hopsgocommando

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the hop sack come untied? Or was there a hole in it? If the latter, and it was not from poor handling, ask your supplier for a free replacement. It was defective.

 

I'm not 100% sure -- I don't think there was a hole in it b/c I tied it, cut off the excess, and when I poured it in with the wort into the LBK, it looked like it was intact.  I"m surprised it "opened" though b/c it was tied pretty securely (at least, it looked like it was!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How can you tell your hopsack came open in your LBK?  I can't see through the dark brown plastic of the LBK well enough to see much details of anything.  And it's generally not a good idea to be opening the top of your LBK to look inside during fermentation.

 

I didn't open the LBK, I used a flash light and just noticed that there were a bunch of small pellet looking type things floating at the top -- I'm assuming they are the pellets from the hop sack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think he knows that it is "muslin". Muslim in the title was probably a typo. We were just poking fun.

You would have graduated high school in the early 80s sometime before standards hit the bottom of the porcelain fermenter. No insult to Kevin, but I don't assume anything these days. I graduated in 1989, but had a decent early education and was 2nd place city spelling. Most of the teachers I came across were of the spelling and grammar are fluid constructs school of thinking. Of course I went to school in Oakland, California, these are the same people who later created "Ebonics."

To quote early Rush Limbaugh, "Words mean things."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would have graduated high school in the early 80s sometime before standards hit the bottom of the porcelain fermenter. No insult to Kevin, but I don't assume anything these days. I graduated in 1989, but had a decent early education and was 2nd place city spelling. Most of the teachers I came across were of the spelling and grammar are fluid constructs school of thinking. Of course I went to school in Oakland, California, these are the same people who later created "Ebonics."

To quote early Rush Limbaugh, "Words mean things."

 

Just a typo.   :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 100% sure -- I don't think there was a hole in it b/c I tied it, cut off the excess, and when I poured it in with the wort into the LBK, it looked like it was intact. I"m surprised it "opened" though b/c it was tied pretty securely (at least, it looked like it was!)

If it was tied shut firmly at the top, and the bottom of the bag, then the only reasonable explanation is that there is a "hole", an opening in mesh of the bag, large enough for some pieces of the hops to escape. After the 3 week fermentation, and 3 days cold crashing in the fridge with the spigot end elevated at least one inch, bottle and carb the beer straight out of the fridge cold. Presuming you are not doing anything fancy like washing your yeast for reuse, fish that hopsack out of the fermenter, and if you can find a hole other than the opening coming untied, get yourself a freebie for that defective hop sack.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a typo. :)

What I hate about using Google Voice type on my phone, is that it often substitutes a homonym for the word I want, or gets punctuation incorrect on its and it's (which amazingly it got right this time, but not in the order I may have wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it was tied shut firmly at the top, and the bottom of the bag, then the only reasonable explanation is that there is a "hole", an opening in mesh of the bag, large enough for some pieces of the hops to escape. After the 3 week fermentation, and 3 days cold crashing in the fridge with the spigot end elevated at least one inch, bottle and carb the beer straight out of the fridge cold. Presuming you are not doing anything fancy like washing your yeast for reuse, fish that hopsack out of the fermenter, and if you can find a hole other than the opening coming untied, get yourself a freebie for that defective hop sack.

 

Cold crashing can just be done in a regular refrigerator, correct?  Or does it have to be done in a fridge set at a specific temperature?

 

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A regular refrigerator.  See the links in my signature for that answer.   ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Horse's Ass Ale has been fermenting now for a week, and unlike the CAL and Oktoberfest batches, I am noticing what I think (hoping) are yeast clumps at the top -- not a lot, but a fair amount. The smell during those first few days was really good -- and it still smells good so I'm hoping it's not an infection (sanitation process was pretty thorough when I was brewing). Planning on cold crashing it for three days prior to bottling. From what I've read, as long as the beer tastes at the three week mark like flat beer, should be OK. If it tastes like vinegar or sour or worse -- then it would indicate an infection of some type, correct?

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Horse's Ass Ale has been fermenting now for a week, and unlike the CAL and Oktoberfest batches, I am noticing what I think (hoping) are yeast clumps at the top -- not a lot, but a fair amount. The smell during those first few days was really good -- and it still smells good so I'm hoping it's not an infection (sanitation process was pretty thorough when I was brewing). Planning on cold crashing it for three days prior to bottling. From what I've read, as long as the beer tastes at the three week mark like flat beer, should be OK. If it tastes like vinegar or sour or worse -- then it would indicate an infection of some type, correct?

Kevin

 

Those are most likely just floating yeast. Fermentation also creates Co2 and this can off gas for days after fermentation is complete. Since Co2 rises, it sometimes forces particles up with it. That's how these "yeast rafts" get there. It doesn't happen with every beer, but it does happen with some.

 

Sour doesn't always mean an infection, sometimes it could just be an off-flavor caused by other factors. But it sounds like your beer is doing fine.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are most likely just floating yeast. Fermentation also creates Co2 and this can off gas for days after fermentation is complete. Since Co2 rises, it sometimes forces particles up with it. That's how these "yeast rafts" get there. It doesn't happen with every beer, but it does happen with some.

 

Sour doesn't always mean an infection, sometimes it could just be an off-flavor caused by other factors. But it sounds like your beer is doing fine.

Thanks Josh.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things now concerning me I guess --

I never sanitized the muslin sack -- it was put into the boiling water before putting it in the keg but...cause to be concerned?

And also - I actually see the muslin sack using a flashlight floating at the top of the wort and it appears it is still tied. If this is the case and there are no holes in the bottom of it, I wonder what those clumps were during that first 24-36 hour period floating to the top...

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things now concerning me I guess --

I never sanitized the muslin sack -- it was put into the boiling water before putting it in the keg but...cause to be concerned?

And also - I actually see the muslin sack using a flashlight floating at the top of the wort and it appears it is still tied. If this is the case and there are no holes in the bottom of it, I wonder what those clumps were during that first 24-36 hour period floating to the top...

Kevin

 

I've forgotten to sanitize the sack many times during dry-hopping and never had any issues (yet). But during a boil, there's no need to sanitize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin:

 

There is a way to fix both issues.

 

It is simply some rat turds floating out that are created when an unsanitized hop sack is used.  

 

 

STOP BEING AN LBK PERV!   :lol:   

 

Seriously, stop looking.  RDWHAHB.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things now concerning me I guess --

I never sanitized the muslin sack -- it was put into the boiling water before putting it in the keg but...cause to be concerned?

And also - I actually see the muslin sack using a flashlight floating at the top of the wort and it appears it is still tied. If this is the case and there are no holes in the bottom of it, I wonder what those clumps were during that first 24-36 hour period floating to the top...

Kevin

The muslin hop sack is sanitized by boiling in the wort. If it is transferred to the fermenter with a sanitized utensil, or clean hands dipped in sanitizer, it should be fine.

Dry hopping is the only cause for concern. Hops are naturally antibacterial, but putting an unsanitized muslin hop sack directly in the fermenter can lead to infection. If you have fresh sanitizer around, just dip the empty hopsack in it and squeeze out the excess before putting the hops in it. Otherwise, boil the hop sack, let the water cool a bit, then wring the excess, and tie the hops in it.

All kinds of floating debris is generated by fermentation. It's probably not the hops then.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin:

 

There is a way to fix both issues.

 

It is simply some rat turds floating out that are created when an unsanitized hop sack is used.  

 

 

STOP BEING AN LBK PERV!   :lol:   

 

Seriously, stop looking.  RDWHAHB.  

<creepily> I like to watch.

No, seriously, you are right. Sometimes though this site makes me WANT to stay on top of looking b/c it seems every day at least one person is having an issue with something that might need attention to salvage the beer.

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<creepily> I like to watch.

No, seriously, you are right. Sometimes though this site makes me WANT to stay on top of looking b/c it seems every day at least one person is having an issue with something that might need attention to salvage the beer.

Kevin

As far as I know, there really is no way to salvage an infected fermentation. Some infections leave the beer at least usable, if not tolerable or even palatable. Oftentimes, the beer can be used for cooking.

Sanitation is therefore key.

Since the LBK is amber, you don't need to worry too much about light strike, as long as you keep it out of direct sunlight. If you aerated the wort properly, and pitched the yeast, both at anything like a reasonable temperature, the only two things you need to worry about are fermentation temperature and CO2 management. CO2 management involves making sure that the airlock vents on your fermenter are unobstructed enough to vent the excess gas. Don't put your fermenter lid on too tightly. If you are fermenting a high gravity wort and are expecting an active high krausen, ensure that your fermenter is kept at the bottom end of yeast's range for the first week or so of fermentation. Fermenting too cold, is always better than fermenting too hot, but it does take longer or may stall completely. Too cold is not even too much of a problem, but too cold for too long can require you to agitate the wort if all of the yeast have flocculated to the bottom of the wort. If its really cold, I suppose you could have killed the yeast, in which case you would have to pitch fresh yeast. In almost all cases, for ale yeasts, a fermenting temperature in the mid 60s F should be just fine. There is no need to go much lower than that, unless you are really worried about blow off through the airlock vents from a really active yeast strain or a high ABV recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Horse's Ass Ale will be ready to bottle by the weekend, and there's a lot less particles floating at the top than there were a couple of weeks ago. If I decide not to cold crash, will the particles that likely transfer into the last few bottles settle during the conditioning and chilling process?

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin:

There is a way to fix both issues.

It is simply some rat turds floating out that are created when an unsanitized hop sack is used.

STOP BEING AN LBK PERV! :lol:

Seriously, stop looking. RDWHAHB.

Classic! ! !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Horse's Ass Ale will be ready to bottle by the weekend, and there's a lot less particles floating at the top than there were a couple of weeks ago. If I decide not to cold crash, will the particles that likely transfer into the last few bottles settle during the conditioning and chilling process?

Kevin

 

In all likelihood, yes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin:

 

There is a way to fix both issues.

 

It is simply some rat turds floating out that are created when an unsanitized hop sack is used.  

 

 

STOP BEING AN LBK PERV!   :lol:   

 

Seriously, stop looking.  RDWHAHB.  

 

 

Classic! ! !

 

Ah, the lengths RB goes through to convince us he doesn't perv on his LBK... it's cute, really...

 

  :lol:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone who claims they never perv their fermenter is probably lying. that would be like a proud papa or mom NOT carrying around scores of photos of their baby to "share" with everyone...including total strangers. theyre either lying or shouldn't be making beer because they clearly lack any form of zeal for the hobby.

 

I proudly perv all my beers. hell, I even sometimes talk to the yeast... little pep talks like "wow! check out the krausen!! great job guys!" or on seeing no activity for 32 hrs " ok men... I mean yeasts... ive fed you... given you a lovely home. I spoken nicely to you and you repay me with no activity? either start putting out foam by tomorrow or ...well... let's just say you wont like what i'll do" then walk off softly laughing in a diabolical way.

 

sometimes when the yeast are really really happy, I can almost hear them singing hosanas and hymns of praise to their benevolent benefactor (me). 2 billion tiny voices all happily joined in song!----------> yeah I know ive said it before but dang it! I luvs yeasties! except for those nasty varieties that set up camp on my fleshy bits and make my skin all red. stupid candida! 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an update, I took a sample of the Horse's Ass (that sounds good!) and it tasted really good -- like a mild IPA.  Not bottling until tomorrow night, but I'm really optimistic for this one.  Will be ready to taste my Oktoberfest next weekend, and will be brewing Pumpkin Lager this Wednesday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...