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Cold crashing virgin

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I'm going to try cold crashing my first batch of beer this week. It's a "traditional dark" beer. I heard that how much sugar i add depends on what temp my beer is at when bottled. I plan on refrigerating it for a full 24 hours and immediately bottling. Any idea how much sugar I should add for a 1 liter bottle assuming beer is around 34 degrees?

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I'm going to try cold crashing my first batch of beer this week. It's a "traditional dark" beer. I heard that how much sugar i add depends on what temp my beer is at when bottled. I plan on refrigerating it for a full 24 hours and immediately bottling. Any idea how much sugar I should add for a 1 liter bottle assuming beer is around 34 degrees?

Your priming sugar depends on what the HIGHEST temperature it reached. For example if you fermented at 64f than you would calculate for 64f not 34f. As far as cold crashing a dark beer you really don't have to. If you do then 3 days at 34-40f.

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ive never cold crashed..  I don't mind haze in my beer. hell , clear.. hazy... cloudy ... chunky... i'll drink it. as long as it tastes good and gets me buzzed...

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I always cold crash, and use the WARMEST temp. I use the calculator at www.screwybrewer.com.

Once the yeast goes into a non-active state during cold crash, no CO2 gets produced, so that temp is irrelevant. Google it and you will see the consensus is to use the highest temp.

I cold crash to solidify trub to get more beer out of the keg. I couldn't care less about clarity.

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I wouldn't say it's irrelevant.  It will determine some of the pressure inside your initially bottle.  For example I washed my glass carboy and let it steep in hot water while the oxiclean did it's thing.  I dumped the hot water out, rinsed cool water, and put the bubbler back on top and it bubbled for a solid hour at a fast pace with nothing inside it but air due to the temperature difference.  A beer bottle ideally would be completely sealed so in theory as the bottle warms from 40 degrees to room temp (which is 80 in my apartment now)  the opposite of what happened to my carboy would happen.

 

Edit:  I've always put the same amount of sugar regardless on temp BTW

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I wouldn't say it's irrelevant.  It will determine some of the pressure inside your initially bottle.  For example I washed my glass carboy and let it steep in hot water while the oxiclean did it's thing.  I dumped the hot water out, rinsed cool water, and put the bubbler back on top and it bubbled for a solid hour at a fast pace with nothing inside it but air due to the temperature difference.  A beer bottle ideally would be completely sealed so in theory as the bottle warms from 40 degrees to room temp (which is 80 in my apartment now)  the opposite of what happened to my carboy would happen.

 

Edit:  I've always put the same amount of sugar regardless on temp BTW

Apples and oranges... You're talking about a thermodynamic occurrence of two different gasses. If PV=nRT (absolute pressure of the gas x volume of gas = amount of substance of gas x the universal constant x the temperature of the gas) then how water molecules react is way different than how CO2 molecules react. A pound of gold and a pound of cotton weigh the same but they take up a different area.

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Actually, a pound of cotton weighs more.

 

1 lb of cotton is 16 ounces Avoirdupois.
1 lb of gold is 12 ounces Troy.

1 ounce (avoirdupois) = 28.4grams x 16oz = 454.4g/lb Avoirdupois.
1 ounce (troy) = 31.1grams x 12oz = 373.2g/lb T

 

 :]

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So I learned if I choose to change my amount of sugar based on temp, the colder i bottle the less sugar i add. That seem about right?

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Yes, that's what the calculators will show you - that colder means less sugar.  HOWEVER, you said "the colder I bottle" and as you see some of us (and most of the internet) are telling you to use the WARMEST temp, not the coldest temp.

 

If you put in 72 and then put in 64 you will see you need less sugar as well.

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So I learned if I choose to change my amount of sugar based on temp, the colder i bottle the less sugar i add. That seem about right?

 

No, the amount of sugar for bottling is dependent upon the volume of beer, not the temperature. You will bottle at 70+ for best results.

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Why is that?

 

Because one of the main points of cold crashing is to clarify it. If you can't see through it, what's the point of clarifying? Though it does still help to cold crash any beer to reduce trub from transferring to your bottles and stretch your yield.

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Why is that?

 

 

Cold crashing (see my signature) has two purposes - enhancing clarity and solidifying trub.  

 

Dark beers aren't clear by nature - they're DARK.

 

I cold crash to solidify trub, to get every last drop I can get out of the LBK without yeast in it.  Most batches I get 595 - 610 ounces of beer out of the original 640 ounces I put in.  

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So josh r you recommend cold crash then move to room temp before bottling? I'm just looking to reduce trub

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So josh r you recommend cold crash then move to room temp before bottling? I'm just looking to reduce trub

 

Cold crashing does NOT reduce trub.  It SOLIDIFIES trub, keeping more in the LBK.  Warm it up and  you've wasted your time - it will flow easily again.  

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Cold crash, then bottle right away while the beer is still cold and the trub is compact. The yeast will wake up to do their job in the bottles once the beer gets back to room temperature.

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Because one of the main points of cold crashing is to clarify it. If you can't see through it, what's the point of clarifying? Though it does still help to cold crash any beer to reduce trub from transferring to your bottles and stretch your yield.

 

 

Cold crashing (see my signature) has two purposes - enhancing clarity and solidifying trub.  

 

Dark beers aren't clear by nature - they're DARK.

 

I cold crash to solidify trub, to get every last drop I can get out of the LBK without yeast in it.  Most batches I get 595 - 610 ounces of beer out of the original 640 ounces I put in.  

 

Okay, I was just making sure there wasn't some other reason. I cold-crashed my first batch the other day, and the yield increase was noticeable.

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When I move the lbk from fridge to counter I figure I rile it up a little. So I let it sit on the counter 20 minutes or so while I sanitize bottles etc. I figure this will help it to settle down some. It's not long enough to make it warm back up.

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When I move the lbk from fridge to counter I figure I rile it up a little. So I let it sit on the counter 20 minutes or so while I sanitize bottles etc. I figure this will help it to settle down some. It's not long enough to make it warm back up.

You're probably better off racking from the fridge.

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Is there such a thing as too long a cold crash.  Let's say a week for a 5 gallon carboy.  Thinking my current stout might be done before I take a weeks vacation so I could just cold crash for that week and bottle when I return.

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I object to this thread for 2 reasons.  First, racy things like this don't belong on the Mr. Beer forum at all.  Second, it's wrong, totally wrong.

 

Cold crashing a virgin is exactly the opposite of what you should be doing.  You need to keep them warm, with a nice fire in the fireplace, a beer or three, soothing music in the background, while you explain to them in your deep voice about the wonders of brewing beer, allowing them to warm to you even more. 

 

What?  The thread isn't about cold crashing virgin?  The OP is asking for help in understanding cold crashing because he hasn't done it before - he's a cold crashing virgin, not cold crashing a virgin?  

 

Well I can see how I misunderstood that, because my signature has had Cold Crashing - What Is It and Why Do You Care? in it since January 31st, and I thought the entire world had read it.

 

What?  The entire world hasn't read it?  And other topics in my signature they haven't read either?  REALLY?  They admit that?   Wow...

 

Regarding cold crashing a virgin, 

 

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Not if they're weighed on the same scale. :lol:

 

If you are doing that, someone is going to be very happy with the amount of gold they get - gold is not weighed the same for a reason.

 

 ;)

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If you are doing that, someone is going to be very happy with the amount of gold they get - gold is not weighed the same for a reason.

 

  ;)

 

Yes...I know. It's hard to keep track of the number of times per day that I weigh gold and give it to people.

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How any of you have any fun making beer, I will never know? .... You all make it sound like work

 

I found myself in a situation where I cold-crashed an LBK before bottling.  I only done it once.  But life happened and the LBK sat in the fridge for over a week.  I'm lucky the misses didn't throw it out with my cats one night.

 

Anyways, I bottled with the recommended amount of sugar from MB and the beer turned out fine.  No bottle bombs or flat heads.

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How any of you have any fun making beer, I will never know? .... You all make it sound like work

That's why I have a couple of beers while I make it.....

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How any of you have any fun making beer, I will never know? .... You all make it sound like work

 

What's that old adage? "Work at something you love, and you'll never actually work a day in your life."

 

Actually, the work starts when it is time to clean up & start washing. The brewing and all the other extraneous stuff is still fun to me.

 

 ;)

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