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Fermenting temps

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I bought a stick-on thermometer and got a reading of 76.  I know this is on the high end of what is recommended.   The place I have it stored is probably the darkest, coolest area of the house.   I also turn the AC up to 79 when I leave (I live in Florida).

 

I saw on the instructional video that you can put the LBK in a cooler to maintain a constant temperature and darkness.  Does anyone else do this?   Will it be cooler in there than the ambient house temperature? TIA!

 

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I keep my LBK in an Igloo cooler, there's room enough in there for it and a few frozen water bottles. With a full 2-liter bottle and a full 1-liter or 24-oz bottle, I can get ambient air temps, with a full LBK in the cooler, at 58-59° F. That equals out to wort temps around 63-66° F at high krausen. After primary fermentation, I only use one 1-liter/24 oz. bottle for every 12-hour shift, and that keeps everything to about 63-64° F.

 

So yes, it does work, and will get colder in there than ambient house temps.

 

:)

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Yes lots of us use this method. Usually you put frozen bottles of water in the cooler with the lbk to keep the temps lower. You may have to experiment to figure out how many you need. Usually more in the beginning when fermentation is most active and generating heat.

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Just started using a Coleman cooler. Have two LBKs in it and I'm maintaining tempreatures between 66-70 with a long term average of 68.

Best bet would be to buy a digital thermometer, tape the probe to the flat side of the LBK, insulate it with a folded dish towel to get the wort temperature. That is what you want to maintain as consistent as possible.

This is the probe I use.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Taylor-Digital-Cooking-Thermometer-with-Probe-and-Timer/26386556

This is the cooler I bought.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-Xtreme-150-qt-Cooler-Green/21947771

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I use 3 different ice chests with 3 LBK's in each but in all I use one 17 fl oz. frozen plastic bottle in each one twice per 24 hour period. I live high in the So Cal mountains at  6100 elevation.  Each cooler has a temperature strip on the LBK.  When the weather is high pressure I use them and when we have low pressure and/or thunderstorms I don't need them during the summer.  Highs of 80's if warm and highs of 60's with clouds.   So far so good and I keep learning from this forum!   :)

 

Idyllbrew

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Thanks all!  I thought I had a cooler big enough to house the LBK, but I think it's too small. I'll look for one soon!

 

Instead of frozen bottles of water, does anyone use the reusable ice packs?

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Wow, That's a lot nicer than the aquarium temperature monitors that I'm using. Where did or would you pick some up like that?

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Wow, That's a lot nicer than the aquarium temperature monitors that I'm using. Where did or would you pick some up like that?

 

Amazon

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I bought a stick-on thermometer and got a reading of 76.

 

Belgian spiced

 

This is what I use. $10 food grade thermometer at WalMart. Drill a hole in the LBK lid slightly smaller than the probe diameter and push into place. Hold in place with some food grade silicone adhesive (search Amazon). The thermometer probe is about 6" long and extends 2-3" into the wort (depending on how full your LBK is). The probe is stainless steel and gets sanitized when I sanitize the LBK. Has worked well for me.

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So I will be getting a cooler from a friend today and will transfer the LBK in. It's been at a steady 76 since Sunday night.   Will lowering the temperature affect the process/taste at all?

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In all likelihood, no, and for 2 reasons.

 

1) You've been fermenting now for 3 days.  Peak temps have likely been hit already, and any damage done.

 

2) You're using a can with a "best by" date of 2012.  Lots of time for maillard reaction, i.e. the wort turning darker and sweeter.  Nothing can reverse that.

 

This batch should be used as a learning experience, so don't be upset if it's not very good.

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I wasn't expecting spectacular results from this first go anyway  :)

 

The extract was a bit sweet.  We just had to taste it!

 

If it comes out tasting better than PBR, I'll be hoppy.

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My batches brewed at too high a temp have a sweaty oily feel to them.

 

I have no idea what that tastes like, nor do I think i want to know  lol!

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I use frozen new Zealand Hampshire mangos, they keep the temp longer than frozen water bottles, however, u have to go to new Zealand to find them. luckily, I just happened to find a place in uraguay last month while I was snow boarding in brazil, and brought home 50 bushels

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In all likelihood, no, and for 2 reasons.

 

1) You've been fermenting now for 3 days.  Peak temps have likely been hit already, and any damage done.

 

2) You're using a can with a "best by" date of 2012.  Lots of time for maillard reaction, i.e. the wort turning darker and sweeter.  Nothing can reverse that.

 

This batch should be used as a learning experience, so don't be upset if it's not very good.

 

So would it be worth it to still put in a cooler and lower the temperature?

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It won't hurt - but likely won't do anything.  

 

 

I'll still do it, because, as you point out, "process matter," and if I'm going to continue on, it'll be good practice to maintain the flow.

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I use frozen new Zealand Hampshire mangos, they keep the temp longer than frozen water bottles, however, u have to go to new Zealand to find them. luckily, I just happened to find a place in uraguay last month while I was snow boarding in brazil, and brought home 50 bushels

Passion fruit from the lava fields of Mount Kilauea is a good alternative. There is a guru located in the Pohakuloa area just outside the Army's training base. If you can get a lava stone and jar of clouds from Mauna Kea he'll hook you up with half price and free shipping until the end of August.

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Passion fruit from the lava fields of Mount Kilauea is a good alternative. There is a guru located in the Pohakuloa area just outside the Army's training base. If you can get a lava stone and jar of clouds from Mauna Kea he'll hook you up with half price and free shipping until the end of August.

 

What size jar?   And does the type of cloud matter?  We've been getting a lot of cumulous lately, but there are days when they are cumulonimbus.

 

Why so cirrus? :D

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What size jar?   And does the type of cloud matter?  We've been getting a lot of cumulous lately, but there are days when they are cumulonimbus.

 

Why so cirrus? :D

 

20oz jar. 

 

I'm not educated in the different types of clouds so what ever is around at the time of your journey. 

 

I'm never cirrus... :)

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With the LBK in a cooler should you leave the lid cracked so some air can flow in and out or do you keep it closed tight? I am on day two of my first brew and am able to keep the air temp in the cooler at a steady temp of 67.

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THat fridge thermometer is real cheap - better than the reptile tank thermometers I use, at $9.99, but then I don't pay postage on them. Still could be cheaper though.

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With the LBK in a cooler should you leave the lid cracked so some air can flow in and out or do you keep it closed tight? I am on day two of my first brew and am able to keep the air temp in the cooler at a steady temp of 67.

 

Leave it closed. The only time my lid is open is when I change ice-bottles. I figure, with the design of today's coolers, if it needs to "burp" off some CO², then it can get that lid open without causing a problem.

 

 :)

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So I've been experimenting all week and have found that a 2-liter bottle keeps the temp at 66 degrees and 2 gatorade bottles keep it around 68.  Most of temp readings have been att he end of a 12 hour shift, so I'll try to take more during the shift this next weekend (got a little busy this weekend!).  This will all be good things to know when I do my second, REAL batch  :)

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Remember that fermentation has a cycle.  It kicks in and temps start to rise and stay there for a period.  Could be as short as 2 or 3 days, or a few days longer, then it drops off.  So your bottle need starts low (or at zero), quickly climbs, then drops again.  What works on day 2 won't work on day 8.  And if you go outside a Mr. Beer yeast, it will be different.  And it may be different if you brew with added LME or DME, or a Craft or Seasonal.  The key when you use frozen bottles is to monitor at least every 12 hours.

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Remember that fermentation has a cycle.  It kicks in and temps start to rise and stay there for a period.  Could be as short as 2 or 3 days, or a few days longer, then it drops off.  So your bottle need starts low (or at zero), quickly climbs, then drops again.  What works on day 2 won't work on day 8.  And if you go outside a Mr. Beer yeast, it will be different.  And it may be different if you brew with added LME or DME, or a Craft or Seasonal.  The key when you use frozen bottles is to monitor at least every 12 hours.

 

That's one of the reason I'm still keeping it cooler even though it was at 76 during high kraussen.  I want to know what combinations of bottles/sizes to use if I want to raise or lower the temps in the cooler during those first 3 days.  I'm sure as with everthing, it will take time and patience to get this down!

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That's one of the reason I'm still keeping it cooler even though it was at 76 during high kraussen. I want to know what combinations of bottles/sizes to use if I want to raise or lower the temps in the cooler during those first 3 days. I'm sure as with everthing, it will take time and patience to get this down!

For the last two batches of Belgian spiced ale it took 2 16oz drinking bottles to maintain 64F during high krausen dropping down to one by day 5 (checking every 12 hours). You're cooling needs are based on the amount of fermentables, yeast, and amount of extra space in the cooler. I have a cooler that has just enough room for an LBK and 2-3 16oz bottles so I'm not trying to cool down alot of extra air space.

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For the last two batches of Belgian spiced ale it took 2 16oz drinking bottles to maintain 64F during high krausen dropping down to one by day 5 (checking every 12 hours). You're cooling needs are based on the amount of fermentables, yeast, and amount of extra space in the cooler. I have a cooler that has just enough room for an LBK and 2-3 16oz bottles so I'm not trying to cool down alot of extra air space.

 

Mine is about the same size. I could fit 2 2-liter bottles in it with the LBK with nothing touching but close enough to keep things cozy.

 

I think the next batch I start will be on a Friday so I can frequently montior temps on the first 3 days and adjust ice containers as needed!

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post-65338-0-33793600-1438610136_thumb.j

This is the cooler I'm fermenting my wild wheat brew in. After pitching the yeast I put a 2L frozen pop bottle and the temp dropped to 57. Took out the frozen pop bottle and temps slowly rose to 64 with the lid closed. Once fermentation kicked in I used a 1L pop bottle only during the day and temps stayed right around 66-68. Overnight no ice was in the cooler and a few times temps rose to 70. Now I'm two weeks in and I'm only using a 16.9oz frozen water bottle to maintain 68 degrees.

As mentioned above, different brews and different yeasts will produce different temperatures during high krausen. So to say this is the process I'll use every batch would be a bad assumption.

Just remember to keep detailed notes of amount of ice used, on what schedule and the temperature range so when you do that same batch again, you'll only have to fine tune and not start from scratch.

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pop bottle ....... pop bottle 

 

your location says New York... your writing says Wisconsin...

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Heh - I have "relatives" up in Virginia that call all carbonated soft drinks "Coke." I $#*! you not.

 

  :rolleyes:

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Heh - I have "relatives" up in Virginia that call all carbonated soft drinks "Coke." I $#*! you not.

 

  :rolleyes:

 

 

That's definitely a southern thing!  When I ask for a coke at a restaurant, they'll usually ask me "what kind".

 

Not that I would EVER admit to being southern....   but I do this.  And eat boiled peanuts.  AND THAT'S AS SOUTHERN AS I GET. :lol:

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I am a born & bred North Carolinian. I cannot stand country music, NASCAR racing, nor boiled peanuts or pickled pigs feet.

 

 :)

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I am a born & bred North Carolinian. I cannot stand country music, NASCAR racing, nor boiled peanuts or pickled pigs feet.

 

  :)

I live in Georgia, and I can't stand any of those things either.

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I am a born & bred North Carolinian. I cannot stand country music, NASCAR racing, nor boiled peanuts or pickled pigs feet.

 

  :)

 

I'm not into country music (though I love bluegrass) nor am I into NASCAR (though I'm fascinated with the moonshine inspired history behind it). But I do love pickled pigs feet, I've never tried boiled peanuts. Though, I am curious about them. But I'm not from the south, either. Well, geographically I am since Arizona is in the SOUTHwest, but definitely not the south you guys are familiar with. I do love southern food, though (well, I love all food, really...lol).

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Heh - I have "relatives" up in Virginia that call all carbonated soft drinks "Coke." I $#*! you not.

 

  :rolleyes:

That's a southern thing. When I was in the army my platoon had a nice mix of northerners, southerns, west coast and east coast soliders. It was quite amusing when we would get into arguments on the proper vernacular for soft drinks.

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I'm not into country music (though I love bluegrass) nor am I into NASCAR (though I'm fascinated with the moonshine inspired history behind it). But I do love pickled pigs feet, I've never tried boiled peanuts. Though, I am curious about them. But I'm not from the south, either. Well, geographically I am since Arizona is in the SOUTHwest, but definitely not the south you guys are familiar with. I do love southern food, though (well, I love all food, really...lol).

 

You could probably buy some in the store, but that prepackaged stuff is for the birds.  If you can get raw green peanuts, just toss them in a big pot of water with salt (and Bay seasoning if you want it to have a kick!) and let it boil for a few hours.   You can tell if they're ready when the legume is soft but not mushy.

 

Good stuff.   Another reason I can't wait for college football season to start.  They sell them all over the place on game day!

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That's a southern thing. When I was in the army my platoon had a nice mix of northerners, southerns, west coast and east coast soliders. It was quite amusing when we would get into arguments on the proper vernacular for soft drinks.

 

Pop, soda, Coke...  it's all the same  :)

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You could probably buy some in the store, but that prepackaged stuff is for the birds.  If you can get raw green peanuts, just toss them in a big pot of water with salt (and Bay seasoning if you want it to have a kick!) and let it boil for a few hours.   You can tell if they're ready when the legume is soft but not mushy.

 

It's the texture that I have a problem with...

 

 :(

 

 

Pop, soda, Coke...  it's all the same  :)

 

Um... no. Pop, soda, soft drinks, sure... but Coke is Coke, dammit! Red can, white swoosh, says Coca-Cola on the side!

 

 sumo.gif

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It's the texture that I have a problem with...

 

  :(

 

Must... resist.. a..  that's what she said... joke!!!

 

It takes a little getting used to, especially when you have a preconceived notion of what a peanut should feel like!  First timed I tried them, I got them cold at a 7/11 and thought they were terrible.   But I tried some hot out of the boiler once, and that's the way to go!

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It's the texture that I have a problem with...

 

  :(

 

 

 

Um... no. Pop, soda, soft drinks, sure... but Coke is Coke, dammit! Red can, white swoosh, says Coca-Cola on the side!

 

 sumo.gif

 

 

And not that New Coke $hit!!!! Real pre 1980's Coca Cola.... 

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I refuse to even acknowledge the existence of that... other soda you mention.

 

 :P

 

A digression: I remember being a kid, always at the mall, and taking the Pepsi challenge about 5 times. Every time, I picked out which one was which, and of course, always preferred the Coke over the Pepsi. I will drink Pepsi, it isn't that I hate it, it is... just different. The carbonation is softer somehow, and it has a slightly different flavour than Coke. I prefer Coke. Oddly enough, I prefer Mountain Dew over Mello Yello.

 

 :)

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Coke and Pepsi both taste like battery acid and Mountain Dew tastes like Sprite that someone vomited up. I prefer root beer. Or just beer. :P

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I refuse to even acknowledge the existence of that... other soda you mention.

:P

A digression: I remember being a kid, always at the mall, and taking the Pepsi challenge about 5 times. Every time, I picked out which one was which, and of course, always preferred the Coke over the Pepsi. I will drink Pepsi, it isn't that I hate it, it is... just different. The carbonation is softer somehow, and it has a slightly different flavour than Coke. I prefer Coke. Oddly enough, I prefer Mountain Dew over Mello Yello.

:)

Funny, I remember taking the Pepsi challenge as well. I could pick out which was which every time (kind of pissed off the person testing me). I have always preferred Coke. I feel that the sugar level in Pepsi makes it more cloying, overly sweet! Coke has always seemed more refreshing.

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Coke and Pepsi both taste like battery acid and Mountain Dew tastes like Sprite that someone vomited up.

 

I can't say I have ever tasted either of those...

 

  :wacko:

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joshr... when I was a kid there were these drive through car hop places called A&W's.. they had awesome burgers but nothing beat the frosty mug of of their (60s era) A&W root beer.. pre-high fructose corn syrup crap...  aw man....good stuff.

 

OLD mountain dew made with real sugar and not corn syrup was good. when I was little they came in bottles with a couple of backwoods redneck hillbillies on the bottle.  really high caffeine content... good stuff too.

 

sprite vomited up , especially through the nose is not something I recommend anyone taste. . . or battery acid.

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joshr... when I was a kid there were these drive through car hop places called A&W's.. they had awesome burgers but nothing beat the frosty mug of of their (60s era) A&W root beer.. pre-high fructose corn syrup crap...  aw man....good stuff.

 

OLD mountain dew made with real sugar and not corn syrup was good. when I was little they came in bottles with a couple of backwoods redneck hillbillies on the bottle.  really high caffeine content... good stuff too.

 

sprite vomited up , especially through the nose is not something I recommend anyone taste. . . or battery acid.

 

They sell a throw-back mountain dew that is made with real sugar. There's also a Dew Shine made with real sugar.

 

Wish they'd bring back Jolt Cola!

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And not that New Coke $hit!!!! Real pre 1980's Coca Cola.... 

 

I remember when that crap came out. It was way too sweet.   Couldn't find the old stuff anywhere!  Then in August when we had football work outs, we found a vending machine in the locker room that still had the old stuff!  It was like gold, Jerry. Gold!!

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joshr... when I was a kid there were these drive through car hop places called A&W's.. they had awesome burgers but nothing beat the frosty mug of of their (60s era) A&W root beer.. pre-high fructose corn syrup crap... aw man....good stuff.

OLD mountain dew made with real sugar and not corn syrup was good. when I was little they came in bottles with a couple of backwoods redneck hillbillies on the bottle. really high caffeine content... good stuff too.

sprite vomited up , especially through the nose is not something I recommend anyone taste. . . or battery acid.

There's a place in Southern Illinois that makes a soda called 'Ski'. It's a citrus soda made with pure cane sugar. The boys in our Boy Scout Troop call it the official soda of the Boy Scouts. It's amazing what things get done around camp for the opportunity to get a Ski. I have to admit that it's pretty good! It's from a place called Excel bottling company and they have recently started brewing 'adult beverages' (beer).

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joshr... when I was a kid there were these drive through car hop places called A&W's.. they had awesome burgers but nothing beat the frosty mug of of their (60s era) A&W root beer.. pre-high fructose corn syrup crap...  aw man....good stuff.

 

A&W restaurants still exist. For some reason, you find them mostly in truck stops now, but there are a few standalone A&W's still left. Unfortunately, I'm sure most of them sell the modern A&W root beer with the HFCS, but it's still the best commercial root beer on the market, in my opinion. It's still not nearly as good as my homemade stuff, though. But yeah, I love A&W restaurants. Great greasy burgers and big frosty mugs of root beer floats. Definitely good stuff. :)

 

 

They sell a throw-back mountain dew that is made with real sugar. There's also a Dew Shine made with real sugar.

 

I've had the Dew Shine. It's definitely better than the regular stuff, but I'm still not into the cloyingly sweet flavor. Cool marketing gimmick, though.

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Coke and Pepsi both taste like battery acid and Mountain Dew tastes like Sprite that someone vomited up. I prefer root beer. Or just beer. :P

Have you tried Birch Beer???

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Have you tried Birch Beer???

 

Yes, I've made it, too. I like it. :)

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Yes, I've made it, too. I like it. :)

There is a farm market a half mile from my house that makes their own. It's like heaven in a can.

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