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ZenLunatic7

Batch vs. Bottle Carb for first time

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So I've been reading a LOT on the forums, and will probably end up doing batch carbonation eventually.    My question is, as a first time brewer (and I have 2 weeks and 6 days left before brewing, including cold crashing!), should I try doing batch right out of the gate, or go safe with bottle?  Pros and Cons of both?  Thanks!

 

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If you still have the carb drops that came with your kit then use them.  If not then go for batch priming.

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I say to get comfortable with the whole process from start to finish first. Use the carb drops for the first few batches and have some success. Then start branching out, batch prime, different recipes, etc. Enjoy the journey!

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Make sure that you use the correct portion for the carb drops if you decide to go that route. I experience the Old Faithful of Beer Geysers last night. When I open a bottle of my Irish Red foam shot straight up. I had beer dripping from the ceiling and foam all over the floor. When the geyser finally stopped there was about an ounce (1 shot) of beer left in the bottle. At least the dogs got to enjoy the beer :D

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You should do bottle priming for the first few batches until you get results you like.  Use sugar at different levels to find the carb level you like best.  Then, consider batch priming.

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For a batch prime, can you just add the sugar/simple syrup to the LBK and then bottle?

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I don't know what simple syrup is.  

 

Batch priming requires another LBK or slimline, the right amount of sugar boiled in a cup or so of water and then cooled (www.screwybrewer.com), a hose or bottling wand to transfer, then a bottling wand to bottle.  

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For a batch prime, can you just add the sugar/simple syrup to the LBK and then bottle?

 

No because you need to mix it really well to avoid inconsistent carbonation between bottles. And you should never stir your beer when it's in the fermenter, or all of that time that was spent for the sediment to form a cake on the bottom during fermentation would have been wasted and your bottles would be 1/4 full of sediment. 

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For a batch prime, can you just add the sugar/simple syrup to the LBK and then bottle?

If you add the sugar to the LBK and then stir, you will disturb the trub on the bottom of the fermenter and you need to stir to get the sugar evenly distributed. You don't want to disturb the trub when bottling.

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So as others have already said, it's much easier to just add the sugar/sugar cubes/carbonation drops to your bottles instead of batch priming. Here's a link to the help area that has your kit instructions plus a priming sugar chart so you'll know how much sugar to add to each bottle.

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Thanks, all!  The kit I picked up didn't have the drops, so I would have to buy them anyway.  I was reading on other forums about how drops aren't necessarily scientifically measured (I used to be a lab rat and know the importance of exact measurements!) and to go with table sugar measured correctly.  Doubling the amount of drops if your volume didn't double doesn't make sense to me!

 

Another issue I will probably run into, and another reason I was thinking of batch carbonation, was that the spigot that came with my LBK is the older "push back" style and not the current one.  I'll be ordering that replacment after this batch is done.   While sanitizing, I found the flow from the spigot to be VERY slow.  If this is by design, then I'm ok with that, but if not, I thought putting into a slimline would help with flow once it's time to bottle.

 

So much to learn! So much to think about!

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Make sure that you use the correct portion for the carb drops if you decide to go that route. I experience the Old Faithful of Beer Geysers last night. When I open a bottle of my Irish Red foam shot straight up. I had beer dripping from the ceiling and foam all over the floor. When the geyser finally stopped there was about an ounce (1 shot) of beer left in the bottle. At least the dogs got to enjoy the beer :D

 

This made me laugh, because it reminded me of the opening scene of Blade when the vampires at the club had blood spraying down from the celiing and they were dancing in it while drinking what they could.  That's probably what I would have done!

 

And it was an Irish RED!  How fitting  :)

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Another issue I will probably run into, and another reason I was thinking of batch carbonation, was that the spigot that came with my LBK is the older "push back" style and not the current one.  I'll be ordering that replacment after this batch is done.   While sanitizing, I found the flow from the spigot to be VERY slow.  If this is by design, then I'm ok with that, but if not, I thought putting into a slimline would help with flow once it's time to bottle.

 

Something else to think about, if you order the bottling wand accessory it comes with a new spigot. That plus the wand would make your bottling a lot easier too.

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Something else to think about, if you order the bottling wand accessory it comes with a new spigot. That plus the wand would make your bottling a lot easier too.

 

Thanks!  Added to my wish list and will get next payday along with bottles  :)

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My two cents for what it's worth, I have been batch priming since about beer number three, 2/3 cup of water boiled with the appropriate amount of cane sugar, cool to about 65 degrees, pour into a clean and sanitized LBK or slim line, transfer the beer from the fermenter and bottle it. As to the appropriate amount of sugar, I got good advice from the folks here and was also pointed to www.thescrewybrewer.com by RickBeer. I would recommend reading every link in RickBeer's signature before brewing anything.

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My two cents for what it's worth, I have been batch priming since about beer number three, 2/3 cup of water boiled with the appropriate amount of cane sugar, cool to about 65 degrees, pour into a clean and sanitized LBK or slim line, transfer the beer from the fermenter and bottle it. As to the appropriate amount of sugar, I got good advice from the folks here and was also pointed to www.thescrewybrewer.com by RickBeer. I would recommend reading every link in RickBeer's signature before brewing anything.

 

I might have missed this before, but how do you transfer from LBK to Slimline? Through the spigot? Siphon hose?

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I might have missed this before, but how do you transfer from LBK to Slimline? Through the spigot? Siphon hose?

 

yeah, use a length of sanitized hose connect from the LBK spigot and placed into the slimeline.  Just gravity fed.  I've done a coil and a half at the bottom of the slimline to maintain as much laminar flow as possible (reducing aeration).  

 

There are siphons out there to use too, but gravity works fine for me thus far, and you don't need to hold anything to do it... 

 

**noting your comment on the old style spigot you've got... transferring to a slimline without being able to hold open the spigot will require you to manually hold it...

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yeah, use a length of sanitized hose connect from the LBK spigot and placed into the slimeline.  Just gravity fed.  I've done a coil and a half at the bottom of the slimline to maintain as much laminar flow as possible (reducing aeration).  

 

There are siphons out there to use too, but gravity works fine for me thus far, and you don't need to hold anything to do it... 

 

**noting your comment on the old style spigot you've got... transferring to a slimline without being able to hold open the spigot will require you to manually hold it...

 

Thanks!  Yeah, I think I'll pull up a chair and a cold beverage and hold that sucker open!

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yeah, use a length of sanitized hose connect from the LBK spigot and placed into the slimeline.  Just gravity fed.  I've done a coil and a half at the bottom of the slimline to maintain as much laminar flow as possible (reducing aeration).  

 

There are siphons out there to use too, but gravity works fine for me thus far, and you don't need to hold anything to do it... 

 

**noting your comment on the old style spigot you've got... transferring to a slimline without being able to hold open the spigot will require you to manually hold it...

I went to Lowe's and purchased food grade tubing that hooks directly to the spigot. Outside dia is 7/16 with an inside dia do 5/16. I bought about six feet of the tubing for about $2.00

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Ok, so I'm definitely going to go with patch priming for this first round. I was playign aroudn with the Screwy Brewer calculator trying to figure out what I'd need.   I got the pale ale with the kit that I picked up.  Am I to assume this is the American pale ale they have listed on the site, with a CO2 volume of 2.26 to 2.78?

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No. That list is for beer STYLES. American Pale Ale is a style of beer. That range shows the carb levels for that particular style.

I again suggest you bottle prime, not "patch" prime, for a few batches.

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No. That list is for beer STYLES. American Pale Ale is a style of beer. That range shows the carb levels for that particular style.

I again suggest you bottle prime, not "patch" prime, for a few batches.

 

Ok, I'll do that. Will probably save me money on my supply shop tomorrow!

 

I'm still curious as to what style of beer the pale ale i got is, though.  You know, for future reference  :)

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Ok, I'll do that. Will probably save me money on my supply shop tomorrow!

 

I'm still curious as to what style of beer the pale ale i got is, though.  You know, for future reference  :)

 

It's probably a pale ale.

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Why the interest in batch priming?  I have a box of raw sugar in individual packets.  When I'm ready to bottle, I add 1 packet to each bottle, add the beer, cap, test the seal, and store for at least a month.  Drink when ready.

 

I also use the raw sugar for my coffee in the morning.

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1) It's possible to miss putting sugar in a bottle or 2 and not catch it. 2) I got to rack to a bottling bucket anyway, so why not?

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Why the interest in batch priming?  I have a box of raw sugar in individual packets.  When I'm ready to bottle, I add 1 packet to each bottle, add the beer, cap, test the seal, and store for at least a month.  Drink when ready.

 

I also use the raw sugar for my coffee in the morning.

 

There were a few reasons.  I know I'll eventually go to batch.   I had an old style spigot that was very slow and figured putting it in a secondary container would help speed bottling up.  I'm a little OCD and wanted to have the same amount of sugar in each bottle independent of how much beer I put in it.

 

Used carbo drops for the first go.  I'll probably add sugar to bottles next time.   Then maybe batch?  we'll see  :)

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Why the interest in batch priming?  I have a box of raw sugar in individual packets.  When I'm ready to bottle, I add 1 packet to each bottle, add the beer, cap, test the seal, and store for at least a month.  Drink when ready.

 

I also use the raw sugar for my coffee in the morning.

I didn't think I would batch prime much either, unless using an extract additive or cold crashing and looking to clear the beer up.  However, I find myself having done it the last four batches, when I didn't have to.  I think for me, it is nice to not worry about any muslin sacks or excess trub going into the bottles - so I transfer to a slimline.  This doesn't necessitate a batch prime in of itself, but in the end, I think it is less time consuming to add 1.4 to 1.7 oz of dissolved sugar to a slimline than it is to measure out individual 3/4 tsp measurements to each bottle.  

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