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Rehydrating yeast

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Hi everyone im getting ready to make a batch of wicked winter warmer and want to use Nottingham dry yeast. Its only a 2.5 gallon batch.the yeast pack is 11.55g the package gives instructions to rehydrate it.do I have to rehydrate or can I pitch it dry and should I only use half of it or pitch the whole pack? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

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Well, some yeasts say to hydrate them - I know Notty is one of them - and some yeasts don't. IMHO, I think it is a good idea to re-hydrate all dry yeasts, as it gives them a better chance of survival & you get a heartier reproductive cycle.

 

I personally would use half the pack, as I have done just that before: I used half a pack I had bloomed in 1/2 C water I had previously boiled & cooled to around 95° F., and have since washed & reused that yeast 3 more times before finally tossing it all away after my last batch with it on a Russian Imperial Stout. I have the other half-pack still in my freezer, waiting to be bloomed & used.

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You can pitch it dry.  Some dry yeasts say to rehydrate, some say to pitch directly.  Many have tried both, and the only difference seems to be faster starting, the end result is the same.   However, key here is how hard the yeast has to work.  Your packet is designed for 5 gallons.  Using it in a 2.5 gallon batch means that the yeast works a lot less.  So, if you pitch the entire packet, it is twice what's required.

 

That said - you can use 1/2 the packet, but what are you doing with the other half?  Saving it for tomorrow?  No problem.  Using it in 3 months?  May be an issue.

 

I see that slym2none responded while I was typing.  I tried rehydrating for a few batches, saw no difference in the end result, so I never do it now.  I use one packet for two 2.5 gallon batches at the same time.  I've never saved 1/2 used dry yeast, and don't recommend it because I've read it's not a good idea.  I guess some people do though.

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Well, I know to keep it dry & cool, so I have been keeping my half-pack in a zip-top bag made for the freezer, in the freezer. I will be using this yeast this coming Friday when I make a batch of Irish red ale, so I will let you all know how that goes. It has been in the freezer app. 3-1/2 months.

 

  :o

 

That is one thing about "proofing" your yeast first - you know if it is alive before you ever pitch it.

 

  ;)

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Thanks for the quick response and the info. I think ill dry pitch half of the pack with this batch and rehydrate the other half with a different batch ill be making later this week just to see if I notice any difference. Thanks again and happy brewing!!

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I have the other half-pack still in my freezer, waiting to be bloomed & used.

can dried yeast survive freezing??? I kind of doubt it, otherwise why would stores keep in in the fridge not the freezer like hops?

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i keep all my yeasts and white labs in the bottom of the fridge in the vegetable drawer, it stays cool enuf, dry enuf, doesnt freeze

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can dried yeast survive freezing??? I kind of doubt it, otherwise why would stores keep in in the fridge not the freezer like hops?

 

I freeze bread yeast all the time without any problem. If anything, a freezer is dryer than a refrigerator, and that's the bigger enemy to yeast.

 

I will let y'all know after hydrating the rest of it next Friday if it blooms or not.

 

 :)

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Keep yeast cool - not frozen. I would re-hydrate the yeast as recommended. I've split the packet and have used it all on other batches. No difference. I would not worry about over-pitching and too much yeast. Lag time seems the same. I've always pitched notty after re-hydration, so I can't compare to dry pitching this yeast.

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This is one of the reasons I went to Fermentis yeasts.  I get just as good of results as I did with Notty but I don't have to re-hydrate.

 

And I do believe dry yeast will keep in the freezer but I wouldn't recommend it.  The refrigerator keeps it just fine.  Just keep it dry.

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Nothing wrong with pitching all the yeast or saving half for a new batch. I see no bennifit of freezing, just keep in the fridge and you will be fine

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Nothing wrong with pitching all the yeast or saving half for a new batch. I see no bennifit of freezing, just keep in the fridge and you will be fine

Actually I believe that over pitching your yeast can lead to putting the yeast under stress and causing off flavors.

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I rehydrated the yeast on my last batch,

 

Observing temperateures close before tossing. Found several methods from diferent sites, (screwy brewer) etc... It worked as described but the performance was low, I suspected age but after week one I added some dextrose to wake them up a bit and it worked.

 

The yeast along with the HME might have been in a warm warehouse a bit too long.

 

I will try the notty on my next two batches of Belgian Spice and Oktoberfest soon. I was searching the Mr Beer site for a nice beaker with blow off nozzle for the liquid yeast culture but did not find.

LHBS I suppose

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Actually I believe that over pitching your yeast can lead to putting the yeast under stress and causing off flavors.

 

This is true, but you'd have to massively over pitch (by a factor of 5X or more) to see any detrimental effects.

 

Half a packet of yeast into a 2-gallon batch of wort is pretty much right there, actually. It could ferment 3 gallons of 1.050 wort easily.

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I freeze bread yeast all the time without any problem. If anything, a freezer is dryer than a refrigerator, and that's the bigger enemy to yeast.

 

I will let y'all know after hydrating the rest of it next Friday if it blooms or not.

 

  :)

From Red Star;

 

Dry Yeast

Dry yeast can be stored in the freezer – it is actually a very good method of storage. The downside is if the yeast is exposed to multiple cycles of freezing and thawing, the activity of the yeast could be compromised. This could even happen in a self-defrosting refrigerator freezer. Anytime the yeast is stored in the freezer it is important to only measure out the amount needed and only allow this amount to sit out for about an hour before using. Temperature means everything to the yeast; if it is cold to start, it will take longer to ‘get going’.  Visit our section on Yeast Shelf Life & Storage/Dry Yeast for more information.

 

(Me) No long term storage in a frost free...that includes food.

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Heh - my yeast & hops both are in the freezer, where I have my ice-bottles stored. THose don't thaw & re-freeze, so I am guessing it's pretty stable right there at least, temperature-wise.

 

NEENER NEENER NEENER!

 

 :lol:

 

Seriously though, if any doesn't think I am not gonna have a packet of yeast as a back-up, y'all are crazy.

 

 ;)

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Heh - my yeast & hops both are in the freezer, where I have my ice-bottles stored. THose don't thaw & re-freeze, so I am guessing it's pretty stable right there at least, temperature-wise.

 

NEENER NEENER NEENER!

 

 :lol:

 

Seriously though, if any doesn't think I am not gonna have a packet of yeast as a back-up, y'all are crazy.

 

 ;)

Nope, it's because heaters kick in every 6 to 8 hours. Won't thaw the ice bottles but will effect small things, like an 11.5g packet of yeast.

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My non-thawing ice bottles stabilize the temperature in that compartment is what I'm saying.

 

Neener.

 

Neener.

 

Neener.

 

 :D

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I think it does. It's the same principle that keeps my Igloo cooler a constant temp while I have my LBK in it.

 

Neener.

 

 :)

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No, cause the igloo don't have heaters(like the 'fridge), which puts out more heat that a few bottles of ice can put out cold(other wise the defrost cycle couldn't work). It even dries out a freezer full of frozen meat, a couple bottles of ice just don't stack up against that. It might would work if you leaned the yeast against or placed under the ice bottles(real heavy on the might), but really probably wouldn't work even then. Save your neeners for when you make a correct assumption.

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Save your neeners for when you make a correct assumption.

 

My fridge doesn't have a heater.

 

This one is for your incorrect assumption:

 

Neener.

 

  :P

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Yeah, back on topic!

 

Yes, you should rehydrate Nottingham, OP, and using half the pack is fine. Store the rest how you like.

 

  :lol:

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I finally got to brew up my winter dark ale tonight and tried for the first time to rehydrate 1/2 a pack of nottingham yeast.I never rehydrated yeast before but figure its time to try some new things and see the results. I made it pretty much straight up with the exception of rehydrated yeast and a 1/2 lb of amber dme,never used that before either. Thanks again for all your responces,allways learning new things on this board.

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