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Bhob

Two Stage Fermentation

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So I was reading this;

 

http://www.leeners.com/docs/bettermrbeerprocess.pdf

 

He strongly recommends transferring the brew to a second barrel after the first week.  Anybody doing this? (Papazian also recommends this.)

 

He also suggests that using cold water to cool the wort is not proper technique, rather a 20 minute or less cooling should be done. The last time I made a batch I used really cold water and when all was added to the extract is was right at 70 degrees, basically an immediate cool down. Is this bad?

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This is not necessary at all. Even if you were to rack the beer into secondary after a week, there will still be trub formation anyway. Taking the beer off the sediment after a week doesn't really take it off the sediment when much of it is still in suspension.

 

He also recommends doing a yeast starter for dry yeast. It's my opinion that this guy doesn't know what he's talking about.

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So I was reading this;

http://www.leeners.com/docs/bettermrbeerprocess.pdf

He strongly recommends transferring the brew to a second barrel after the first week. Anybody doing this? (Papazian also recommends this.)

He also suggests that using cold water to cool the wort is not proper technique, rather a 20 minute or less cooling should be done. The last time I made a batch I used really cold water and when all was added to the extract is was right at 70 degrees, basically an immediate cool down. Is this bad?

From my very limited experience it is my understanding that basically all ales don't need a secondary fermenter, only lagers require it.

I've also heard that ales never need to be cold crashed but I'm not sure why. Seems like a preference thing to me.

I've also heard that you should use a yeast starter when using liquid yeast, dry yeast only needs to be proofed.

Adding cold water is a very legit way of cooling wort! I've never heard anyone say otherwise. Maybe that's not how they do it but it's not a wrong way.

P.S. It's 341 pm and I'm a little buzzed so take my opinion for what it's worth

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Lagers do not need a secondary either...

I cold crash all ales...

Cold water is fine...

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josh.. I agree. this guy sounds like he doesn't know anything.  doing starters for reasonably fresh dry yeast can actually be detrimental.  also taking the wort off the yeast bed needlessly can cause problems for the fermentation. wow....  as for not adding cool water and doing a cool down period instead? seriously?  ive heard of no chill fermentation but mr beer kits are made to be simple.. and get the fermentation going fast.  letting the wort sit around just opens you up to another possible avenue for infection unless youre super careful and super clean.

 

 

in 3 years plus that Ive been brewing ive never made a starter for dry yeast or not chilled the wort down to pitch temp rapidly as possible..  and ive only ONCE racked to a secondary for a high grav beer that was going to age a bit before bottling.

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Likewise, I usually pitch dry yeast right into LBK after mixing in wort concentrate and topping up - unless it is REALLY hot. Yesterday I did let LBKs cool in my basement to mid or low 70's before adding yeast but not usually as one was lager and the other was > 80 deg.. (The lager got icepacks in the cooler also after pitching). The LBK is usually down to good temp in the 65 deg basement within a few hours anyway.

 

Nor do I use secondary or cold crash. I rely on time and gravity to clear the beers in the bottle while they age.  After 2-3 months it usually clears pretty well.  For earlier drinking it would likely help clarify.

 

Depending on the yeast some beers end up clearer than others, but I am not entering competitions so I do not care if I get extra vitamin B :-)

 

So I would say you don't have to do these things to get very drinkable homemade beer. If you do these, you may get a better product in terms of clarity and some finesse in taste.

 

I will say I have very rarely got  cidery notes (has happened a couple of times only ) and never had an infection so far.

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I think I'll be spending some time reading that Brulosophy blog, good stuff!

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when I brew an advanced or speciality beer such as chimay, or a 5 gal. recipe I usually rack into a secondary for further fermentation, along with a secondary yeast either liquid or dry.

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I think the accepted practice among experienced home brewers is to rack the beer into a secondary only if they are going to be adding fruit to it. For example my Ale primary fermentations are finished in one week, but I leave the beer in the fermentor for a week after that, so the yeast can absorb off flavor compounds before going dormant. At the end of the two weeks I drop the temperature of the beer to 36F and let the beer 'cold crash' for one week, before transferring the cold beer to corny kegs to force carbonate it.

 

When I make my Octoberfest/Marzen Lager I follow pretty much the same process except that I allow the cold kegged beer several weeks more time to 'lager', or cold condition before serving it. Lager's are supposed to taste clean and the longer cold conditioning time will work to help the protiens and yeast to drop to the bottom of the keg. Lagers also need twice the amount of yeast than you would use for a similar size Ale fermentation of the same gravity. A package or vial of liquid yeast, when added to a two liter yeast starter on a stir plate, will also re-energize and double the amount of packaged cells.  

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