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Vakko

If you want to make lagers...

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http://www.brewjacket.com/

 

Randomly found this through the wormhole that is the internet.

While I have a deep freezer converted to a temperature controlled basement, my biggest problem is that it can only have 1 temperature set at a time.

This causes me to make beers by type at the same time.  I can't brew a lager and an ale at different temps.

Additionally, it's also where I cold crash.  So if I'm making a beer that only needs 14 days to ferm, I can't switch over to chilling phase unless my other brews in there are also ready to chill as well.

 

With this brewjacket system, I can just keep my deep freezer at 38F and only put stuff in there that needs to crash.  All other batches will brew at their own preferred (ideal) temp.

 

Just a thought for people out there.

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thats a more subtle fermentation set up that can be an accent piece in your home where the wife probably wudn't mind as much.

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eventhough, the cool zone I use is very similar, not as compact or maybe convenient as the brewjacket version, I would be interested if it could be used to ferment a 10 gal. recipe.

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I have three TEC chambers, and getting more than 20 degrees below ambient is a challenge. My converted ice chest running two 5 amp TEC's will do 19-20C, my single cooler system only does about 10.

 

I thought I would try to do a few lagers now that it has cooled off, but it wasn't happening during the summer. However, after reading this,

 

http://byo.com/malt/item/1488-the-lowdown-on-lagering-advanced-brewing

 

I'm going to stick to Ales. 

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I have a wine fridge with TEC cooler (that I have to replace because it died) but that also did not get real cold. Wine - yes. Beer maybe.

 

Apparently you need to give them lots of ventilation or they die.

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I thought I would try to do a few lagers now that it has cooled off, but it wasn't happening during the summer. However, after reading this,

 

http://byo.com/malt/item/1488-the-lowdown-on-lagering-advanced-brewing

 

I'm going to stick to Ales. 

 

Yeah, based on the article, you'd need to dedicate a chiller for quite a long time.. minimum 5 weeks for primary and secondary... then there is cold lagering after bottling... I have fermented cold (primary only) and then bottled and warm conditioned.  My results have not been ideal samples of lagers, but it hasn't hurt trying to get there :)  

 

I can't dedicate my mini fridge to a primary, secondary and bottle conditioning for a lager (dopplebock in for a minimum of 133 days!)  ... But it sounds like a great reason to get another one :)  

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well when I lagered my octoberfest/marzen 5 gal. recipe, I just put it in a closet that is a cooler temp. I didn't cold crash due to the fact its not as easy with a 6 gal. carboy than a 2.5 gal lbk  unless u have a fridge or something large enuf to use, in my case I dnt,. I guess I cud uv used my cool zone kit for a secondary but I didn't and the octoberfest came out exceptionally perfect! what I like about this new product is that it's a all in one self contained, u can do a primary/secondary and even cold crash. no need for ice bottles, or water jacket/ water cooler, and takes up less space.

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The most accurate way to control fermentation temperatures is to insert a thermowell 12 inches down into the fermenting beer. The probe of a digital temperature controller, such as the one found on the venerable STC-1000+, is then inserted into the thermowell to provide accurate readings on the fermenting beer. When used with a small chest freezer and a paint can heater, the temperature controller can easily maintain the temperature of fermenting beer to within a single degree. 

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