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imwentzel21

Beer Taste

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I have made three batches of beer and on all three there has been a particular taste to it that seemed like some kind of syrupy taste. Is there anyway to get rid of this on the batches that I have still? I just feel like it is kind of a waste to keep making beer without finding out how to change it first.

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Can't say I have seen that description before. Did you follow the directions exactly?

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What did you make?  Are you making the batches straight up? Try a Mr. Beer recipe if you have not yest done so. Extract brews can have somewhat of a familiar tast to them depending on what you make.

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I started a thread a while ago called Everything tastes the same. My description was molasses. If you taste the HME right from the can, using your sterilized finger of course  :) , that flavor was what the final beer was like. Dad's Cream Ale, Patriot Ale and anything made with the American Lager are the most prone to this in my opinion. I did some things that have helped, but this flavor does seem to hide underneath it all.

 

Getting cooler fermentation temps for longer times has helped. I'm pretty much on a 3-4-1 ferment-condition-chill schedule, and I started cold crashing the last three days of the fermentation period. Some recipes need to condition longer, but I follow the instructions mostly. I also really aerate it a lot with a powered whisk. The recipes that use hops also are better in my opinion than those that do not. Also, the recipes that use honey seem to be better. I saw a comment from RickBeer that said honey helps to produce a dryer finish, and maybe that is part of it.

 

I am starting to experiment with grains, we'll see what that does.

 

But, Witches Flight, Wild Wheat, American Gold, and most things made with Canadian Blonde seem to be working for me now. California Dreamin is my favorite so far.

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I havnt found to many recipes that sre the same. Maybe a slightly similiar under tone but for most part they have all been different. But i know if u screw a recipe ull mever forget that flavor

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Many people can detect what is often called a "extract twang" in their extract beers. I've never seen a good explaination for this.  But the best way to get rid of it (reduce it?) is to steep some grains into your beer. Do some research on this and, once you do it, you'll notice a vast improvement in all your beers.

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I made an extract w/steeped grains Irish Red, and it still had a little extract twang. I have a few left, aging them for a while to see if it goes away.

 

  :)

 

Tonight, I am brewing up a version of that blonde recipe I gave out a day or two ago. I have 1-1/2 pounds lite DME to use up, so I am supplementing that with 3 pounds of grains in a mini-mash. Wish me luck!

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Pardon us for filling in the gaps with mindless banter, whether we were attributing anything from it to the OP or not...

 

 
:rolleyes:

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Opie was a child star.... my cerveza had a twaaaaang to it, really leaning toward the acidic flavor so i took about 4 lbs of light dried malt, split into 2 lbs per two weeks to help mellow that shania twang taste. it's now lingering in the secondary fermentor for additional 2 weeks and i think it's paying off finally. i sampled probably at least a 6 pack worth yesterday, passed out sitting up in a chair, music blasting bcuz i had the cd player on shuffle. woke up 6 hrs later with massive hangover!!! i'd say it is a success!!!!!

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I made an extract w/steeped grains Irish Red, and it still had a little extract twang. I have a few left, aging them for a while to see if it goes away.

 

  :)

 

Tonight, I am brewing up a version of that blonde recipe I gave out a day or two ago. I have 1-1/2 pounds lite DME to use up, so I am supplementing that with 3 pounds of grains in a mini-mash. Wish me luck!

 

 Where was that recipe?

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http://community.mrbeer.com/topic/34721-whats-next/#entry428409

 

I went with a partial-mash, as noted above. Instead of 3.3# LME, I went 1-1/2 DME and 2.5 pounds of Vienna malt, mashed that in 1.5 gallons of water at 150 degrees for 75 minutes with the other two specialty grains. I should have gone with only 2 pounds Vienna, as it is "slightly out of style" with a possible 6% ABV.

 

I have a write up coming with pics, maybe I'll write it up here and C&P it elsewhere since I can't paste on this site.

 

Hmm...

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Back to beer taste, I'm not so sure the MB Forum isn't getting punked here by the OP -- this was my first impression reading the post with its vague details and reference to "syrupy," a lame dig directed at HME brewers.  I could be way off here, but am ready to apologize if so. :unsure:   

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I don't know about a twang in the beer, but after a couple I can't help adopting a strong country accent.

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FTR - I have never had "extract twang" in any Mr. B beer. Really only noticed it once in the aforementioned Irish Red recipe I used. The one bad Mr.B beer I made was due to me pitching the yeast at too-high temps and not getting it cooled down quickly enough. Totally my fault. Every other time, I followed good procedures & made good beer.

 

 :)

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Is "extract twang" merely a brewing myth or Internet legend? For first time liquid extract brewers, who are following the brewing directions to the 'T', probably not and here's why. When you boil 4 quarts of water, turn off the heat and stir in a few cans of LME to make wort, well nothing could be any easier right? To this newly made wort you next pour in a gallon of cold water to cool the wort down to near pitching temperature. A very basic brewing process yes, but its one that is likely to blame for any 'extract twang' that develops in your finished beer.

 

On the other hand if the 4 quarts of water, and the gallon of top off water, were combined and brought to a boil at the same time you could do a full wort boil. Adding the liquid extract to a larger volume of boiling water and then continuing the boil for 10-15 minutes will eliminate that twang for good. The twang, or caramel and toffee like flavors, are really caused by having a higher concentration of sugars in the wort produced using only a gallon of water.

 

Doing full wort boils also requires the use of an ice bath or immersion chiller to cool the wort down to pitching temperatures, now that the top off water will no longer be used. As the brewing water heats up you could steep 8 ounces of grain in it, maintaining it at a temperature of 150F for 20 minutes. A full wort boil also allows you the opportunity to add hops to the boil for increased aroma. If you decide to advance your new found hobby and stick with it, you may soon find yourself owning a wide array of brewing gadgets and really enjoying yourself too.    

 

 

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4 hours ago, Screwy Brewer said:

Is "extract twang" merely a brewing myth or Internet legend? For first time liquid extract brewers, who are following the brewing directions to the 'T', probably not and here's why. When you boil 4 quarts of water, turn off the heat and stir in a few cans of LME to make wort, well nothing could be any easier right? To this newly made wort you next pour in a gallon of cold water to cool the wort down to near pitching temperature. A very basic brewing process yes, but its one that is likely to blame for any 'extract twang' that develops in your finished beer.

 

On the other hand if the 4 quarts of water, and the gallon of top off water, were combined and brought to a boil at the same time you could do a full wort boil. Adding the liquid extract to a larger volume of boiling water and then continuing the boil for 10-15 minutes will eliminate that twang for good. The twang, or caramel and toffee like flavors, are really caused by having a higher concentration of sugars in the wort produced using only a gallon of water. 

 

 

I like post quite a bit,  but it still has me wondering things.  Ive made 15 batches and 6 had a twang to them, some more than others.  The ones that had no twang all had a 60 min partial boil.  I pretty much came to the assumption that you cant just add a can of HME to already boiled water and yield a perfect batch. 

 

Now what really has me perplexed is my last batch of Brew de Ale ze Bub has a slight, slight twang to it.  I did a hop stand for 45 min at 170 degrees.  Really didnt expect it with that batch since I did that hop stand.  But i still did the LBK top off that youre talking about, do you think I should stop that?.  I have a big enough pot to boil 3 gallons so I could always do a full boil, Id just need to keep more ice on hand.  Good thing I live in WI and snow is usually abundant.

 

I believe in the Extract Twang, and I despise it.  I also depise those of you that have never had a batch with the twang.  ;)

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If using the hop-stand technique on a MrB beer, I prefer to boil two gallons of water before adding the HME. After adding the can & stirring it in, the temps are usually down to the 185 degree area, and depending on if you want a little bitterness from the hop-stand hops, you can throw them in right after, or wait a few minutes (or even run some tap water in the sink & place the pot in there for 5 minutes or so) to let it cool down to 170 or so and then throw the hops in so you don't get many/any IBUs.

 

But that's just me.

 

;)

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I'm noticing that using different yeasts has had a pretty big impact as well. But I have never been able to get rid of the twang in American Lager so I gave up on that one. I just bottled the Chewbeerca which uses the T-58 with Diablo and did not detect the twang. FWIW, I also seem to get better results with the DME rather than the LME's, but I can't explain why.

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The last few batches of Mr. Beer HME if made were the dark beers, spiced Christmas ale, winter dark ale and the Cascadian Dark Ale and none came out with the "twang" or "green apple" taste. For the batches, with the exception of the CAD I followed the directions of boiling four quarts water, add the HME, pour into a gallon of chilled water and top off. 

 

I assume that's because the darker Mr. Beer extract is more forgiving in flavor than the lighter beers. 

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I've also had the twang, that almost metallic, almost cidery under- or after-taste. It's not a troll, and it's not a rumor. I'm about 10 batches in, and follow the instructions to a "t" -- and had both my Staggerback Stout as well as Gila Monster IPA have that twang. (While Witch's Flight and Voodoo have not had it.)

 

The first impression I had, about a month in, was the hops hadn't properly balanced or mellowed, and blamed it on the Diablo IPA HME but after 2 months, the taste does seem to go a little "metal" although not like oxidation. I use filtered water and start with 4 cups, then top off with room temperature water... 

 

As screwy brewer suggests above, perhaps I should add more water and boil the wort that way?

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7 minutes ago, rogerlb said:

Staggerback Stout as well as Gila Monster IPA have that twang

 

Would you mind my asking how long you conditioned them? There are a few reasons that your beer might have that twang, but the first one that comes to mind is conditioning. They're both pretty high-ABV beers with lots of dark malts. Beers like that tend to be a bit on the harsh side right after they're done, and usually need time to mellow out

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The Staggerback Stout was fermented 3 weeks, then conditioned for 6 weeks before I tried the first one. (I know that's early). Drinking them through the next 6 weeks, I seemed to notice the twang wasn't going away and maybe getting a a little more pronounced? At the time I thought I might have not sanitized properly; since then I've been using purely distilled water, no tap.  

 

My Gila Monster was fermented 3 weeks, first bottle was 1 month out, and seemed very hoppy. Fine, I know it was early and I like to take tests to see how things are developing. Now, 8 weeks out, I'm again sampling (still have 7 left) and finding the twang is more "twang" than hops. Great base beer but wondering if this is my fault, simply too young, or possibly a characteristic of the more hoppy beers?

 

So, if I let them sit another month or so, if it mellows and dissipates, that's all good. I didn't give the Staggerback more than 3 months, but I can wait on the Gila Monster (pipeline is slowly filling up).

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Update, a week later, following up on @MRB Tim, it's creeping up on 2 months for the Gila Monster being conditioned. The "twang" on the next one was much less pronounced. The beer is changing under my nose. Being less than 10 batches into my MrBeer experiment/hobby, I'm realizing how much "have patience" is something you guys mean -- SERIOUSLY -- when you say it.

 

Might have had a sanitation problem with my Staggerback (see above) but this Gila Monster'll be fine. Thanks, Tim

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