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Creeps McLane

What Ive learned in my first 6 months of brewing

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Part of #2 - conditioning time depends on the beer style. IPAs definitely need to be drank as soon as they are fully carbed. Some of the lighter styles can get away with this as well.

 

I made a batch of a blonde not long ago, took a FG reading and instead of drinking it, I made up a bottle out of it and added sugar so it could carbonate while I cold-crashed the bulk of the beer. Literally 3 days went by, bottled the cold-crashed beer earlier today, and tried the FG sample bottle tonight after refrigerating it since this morning. I popped the cap, it had a nice hiss, poured beautifully, and tasted great! AT THREE DAYS IN THE BOTTLE!

 

Now, for new brewers, it's nice to get them into a routine, and my 3-day beer is pretty much the exception and not the rule, but I am just saying that conditioning all beers for 3-4 weeks might not be in the beer's best interest. Most will be fine at that time frame or even longer, but some beers do need to be drank young.

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35 minutes ago, slym2none said:

Part of #2 - conditioning time depends on the beer style. IPAs definitely need to be drank as soon as they are fully carbed. Some of the lighter styles can get away with this as well.

 

I made a batch of a blonde not long ago, took a FG reading and instead of drinking it, I made up a bottle out of it and added sugar so it could carbonate while I cold-crashed the bulk of the beer. Literally 3 days went by, bottled the cold-crashed beer earlier today, and tried the FG sample bottle tonight after refrigerating it since this morning. I popped the cap, it had a nice hiss, poured beautifully, and tasted great! AT THREE DAYS IN THE BOTTLE!

 

Now, for new brewers, it's nice to get them into a routine, and my 3-day beer is pretty much the exception and not the rule, but I am just saying that conditioning all beers for 3-4 weeks might not be in the beer's best interest. Most will be fine at that time frame or even longer, but some beers do need to be drank young.

see, this is a source of a whole different debate here.  Thats the priming sugar you use and how it differs.  some say its all the same, sugar is sugar and its all the same.  In my experience, sugar cubes and bottle priming give you a steady and calculated increase ratio for days conditioned and carb level.  When I use corn sugar, I feel like its a slow gradual climb and them BOOM, beer is carbed.  I agree, drink IPA's as soon as their carbed, just dont waste beers sampling and figuring that hey, week four produces primo beer.

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3 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

What about the California Dreamin? 

this was one of my favorite summer beverages! but of course I always add an extra booster, this is another one of three 5 gal. recipes i'll be doin in march, to be ready around early summer

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to be honest what I've learned about brewing in the first 6 months??? I should have started in my 20's, and then realized 5 gallons at a time just isn't enough!

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15 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

1) Temp control is key.

 

I couldn't agree more about this one.  I just had my one year brewer's anniversary.  Over the last year I had a couple of batches that I fermented too hot.  I ended up with citrus off-flavors that gave my beer a weird taste and fusel alcohols that gave me a headache.  I recently followed forum member suggestions and started fermenting the wort at 65F.  The fermentation at 65F is much cleaner and the beer tastes great.  Try to control your fermentation temp as much as possible and aim for the low-end of the yeast range.  You'll be pleased with the results. 

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All very good advice, the only item I would add is Read and Learn.  Read every forum you can get your hands on, you will find that there a differing opinions about some subjects but not all subjects especially the important ones.  Also, don't be afraid to ask questions, we were all in your boat at one time and we understand.

 

Temp, Patience and Cleanliness are the most important.  The first and third you can easily control and the second takes some training but it will pay off in the long run.   

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On 12/26/2015 at 2:07 AM, NwMaltHead said:

What about the California Dreamin? 

 

That's a great song by The Mamas & The Papas.

 

 

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just to add, I think documentation is important as well.  As noted, there are lots of websites with lots of opinions and perspectives.  If you decide you want to use a certain yeast at a certain temp, make sure you record that so you can tweak variables in the future.  

 

I know some people stick to a few select batches and pretty much have them keyed into an ideal brew for them, but if you are like me and like to try a large variety of recipes, I know I find it important to document items like pitching temp, fermenting time, malts, hops, priming sugar amount, OG, FG, etc.  As I learn more I can then revisit old recipes and tweak a variable to improve on an earlier brew.  

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1 hour ago, cowboykyle said:

just to add, I think documentation is important as well.  As noted, there are lots of websites with lots of opinions and perspectives.  If you decide you want to use a certain yeast at a certain temp, make sure you record that so you can tweak variables in the future.  

 

I know some people stick to a few select batches and pretty much have them keyed into an ideal brew for them, but if you are like me and like to try a large variety of recipes, I know I find it important to document items like pitching temp, fermenting time, malts, hops, priming sugar amount, OG, FG, etc.  As I learn more I can then revisit old recipes and tweak a variable to improve on an earlier brew.  

gallery_66667_61_2391124.jpg

these are my notes, I agree, more notes, the better

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3 hours ago, slym2none said:

You're left-handed, aren't you?

No sir, I may be a bit strange but I'm no south paw. Although I can some what swing a bat left handed 

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I've seen that form or something like it somewhere before, a brewnotes notebook or something maybe?

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I know the 3-4 rule as it has been etched in my brain.  As a new brewer and with my first brew just being the plain old boring CAL that came with my kit to get me started, I'm guessing that 1 week/2 weeks conditioning will probably be no different than being fully conditioned for 4 weeks.  I plan to do a test bottle either way at 2 weeks just to see, but I'm gathering that these "lighter" styles as mentioned here can get probably get away with much less conditioning time. 

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Nope.  Taste away.  Or read the countless posts from other non-believers. :lol:

Edited by RickBeer

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55 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Nope.  Taste away.  Or read the countless posts from other non-believers. :lol:

 

Nope as in CAL will taste the same at any week of carbonation no matter what, or nope as in still wait the 4 weeks as recommended? 

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