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Grifoniqb

Priming Rule of Thumbs

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Quick question regarding amounts/ease of the priming sugars.  I have one batch conditioning in the plastic bottles and used the carbo drops--super easy and just have to wait the conditioning time to try.

 

Now, my question is in the other bottle sizes.  Living in europe, I am awarded the opportunity to collect may different bottle sizes/designs that I would love to utilize for my own brewing.  The three main sizes I have been able to collect are .33ml, .5ml, and .66ml.  So, the half liters are easy....1 carbo drop.  Now, I am assuming i could split the drops in half for the .33's and then use 1.5 drops for the .66's.  

 

So, I am wondering would it just be easy/quicker/cleaner to use table sugar to prime all of the others instead of cutting a bunch of the tabs in half?

 

My next question, should drop amounts vary with style/type of beer?

 

Thanks in advance.

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The Mr. Beet Beer sugar chart shows you amounts for many sizes (see below). 

 

I only used table sugar before I started batch priming, a Mr.  Beer sugar measurer makes it easy. Mr. Beer sugar measure

 

Yes,  carbonation varies by style.  And amounts vary depending on the highest temp your brew hit.  www.screwybrewer.com has a calculator. 

 

sugar.png

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Yes, beet sugar.  That's what table sugar is in Michigan...

 

Tablet computer... :D

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The easy way to measure if you don't have carbo drops or a pill cutter  or don't want to use a spoon and get granulated sugar mess everywhere, is to use the sugar cubes (dots) the 198 to the 1 lb box ones.   Each cube is ~ 1/2 tsp. That is what I do.

 

Then what I use is 2 cubes in 500ml, 3 cubes in 750 ml, 4 cubes in  1 l  based on proportion to beer volume.

 

(From the priming amount in the picture above it would be 2 cubes, 4 cubes and 5 cubes, but I find that is too much - but it is personal taste.)

 

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Something that jumps out at me from that chart is that the priming amount changes aren't proportional. For instance: If a half liter needs 1 tsp, why does a whole liter need 2 1/2 tsp?

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Without getting too technical let me just say that the Mr. Beer recommended priming sugar amounts are a tad high. Now with that said, at some point you will decide to use a bottle priming calculator, to 'dial in' your carbonation levels to a specific style of beer. As beer ferments a small amount of residual CO2, about 0.75 of a volume, will naturally be retained in the fermented beer. A good priming calculator includes this residual COits calculations when determining the correct amount of priming sugar to use.

 

"Naturally carbonating your beer should be done soon after your beer has reached it's final gravity, which is based on getting the same hydrometer reading two or more days apart. Adding the right amount of fermentable sugar to the beer will provide the yeast with just enough food for them to create the right amount of CO2 needed to hit your carbonation level. Remember when using the calculator be sure to input the 'warmest' temperature the beer has reached prior to bottling it, colder beer holds CO2 in solution better than warmer beer which allows CO2 to escape easier."

 

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1 hour ago, gophers6 said:

Something that jumps out at me from that chart is that the priming amount changes aren't proportional. For instance: If a half liter needs 1 tsp, why does a whole liter need 2 1/2 tsp?

 

I will be working on revising this chart in the coming days to a more accurate version.

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when I prime batch a 5 gallon I use about 5 oz. of corn sugar which is equivalent to about a full smoothed top 1 cup

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24 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

when I prime batch a 5 gallon I use about 5 oz. of corn sugar which is equivalent to about a full smoothed top 1 cup

 

5oz of corn sugar usually = 3/4 cup. But you're correct that it's basically 1 oz per gallon.

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what really blew my mind about this whole brewing business when I first got started was that sugar carbonates the beer, something as simple as sugar with the reaction to the yeast makes a magical ingredient to beer!! I  thot at first the carbonation drops were specifically formulated carbonated drops pressed into a solid substance then dissolved into beer. and as per reading this forum they're just simply sugar drops......its still a fascinating conversation when I tell people how simple and fun it really is to brew beer

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Thanks for all the inputs!!!

 

From the beer carbonation calculators it seems super low when compared to the Mr. Beer chart.

 

I really like the sugar cube idea!!!  

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But different styles of beer with different adjuncts might do better with different amounts of carbonation.  

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Yeah, that is the one thing I have noticed when traveling throughout Belgium and trying the different beers was how the carbonation varied.

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Carbonation will always vary between styles. But this is a more complicated subject that really has no place in the Mr. Beer kit instructions because they are geared for novices (but don't let that stop you from experimenting). Our carb drops are formulated to reach the average rating of carbonation, which is 2.5 volumes of Co2. No one is saying you HAVE to use the amount recommended. This is simply the most common volume of Co2 in most styles of beer.
 

beer-carbonation-levels.jpg

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I cant thank you guys enough for making it easy!!!  Especially to help build the confidence and help lea us newbies to make drinkable beer!  

 

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On 12/29/2015 at 11:00 AM, MRB Josh R said:

 

I will be working on revising this chart in the coming days to a more accurate version.

Josh,

   Were you able to post a revised chart yet?

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49 minutes ago, brewchamp said:

Josh,

   Were you able to post a revised chart yet?

 

No. At this point it's not a top priority. We've had the same chart for a long time now with few issues so it can stick around a little longer. But I do plan on doing a revision at some point soon. We're just a bit busy still with the residual holiday customers. Hopefully it should slow down by the end of the month and I can start working on the smaller, lower priority projects such as the priming chart.

 

Welcome to the community, by the way! :D

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