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AnthonyC

Lactose and Oatmeal

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I went to my LBHS yesterday and picked up a pound of lactose & oatmeal.  I just have a few questions before I start experimenting:

 

1.  How much of each per 2 gallon batch?

2.  When do I add them?  

3.  How long do they need to boil, if at all?

4.  Oatmeal is hop sacked or commando?

 

Thanks in advance & Happy New Year to all of you!  ?

 

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1. Lactose = 2 - 4 oz, Oatmeal = 4 oz

2. Lactose = Add with your malt extracts. Oatmeal = steep (in a muslin bag - a hop sack will work) in your initial 4 cups of water for 30 mins. Keeping the temp around 155-165 during the steep will give the best results.

3. Lactose = Not boiled. Add to boiled water with the extract after removing from heat. Oatmeal = Not boiled, steeped (see #2.).

4. Hop sack (keep it loose and not packed too tight).

 

Cheers! :D

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On December 30, 2015 at 10:15 AM, MRB Josh R said:

1. Lactose = 2 - 4 oz, Oatmeal = 4 oz

2. Lactose = Add with your malt extracts. Oatmeal = steep (in a muslin bag - a hop sack will work) in your initial 4 cups of water for 30 mins. Keeping the temp around 155-165 during the steep will give the best results.

3. Lactose = Not boiled. Add to boiled water with the extract after removing from heat. Oatmeal = Not boiled, steeped (see #2.).

4. Hop sack (keep it loose and not packed too tight).

 

Cheers! :D

 

Josh, I would like to steep some oatmeal but want to know if I can steep it in more than 4 cups of water. My problem is that I've started to use a bigger pot (think spaghetti pot, the exact size escapes me at this time) because I was risking overflow of wort in the smaller pot. The water level for 4 cups in this larger pot seems a little thin and I don't believe it's optimal for steeping. Could I use more water? If so, do I need to add more oatmeal? I want to do this with the Irish Stout deluxe refill. 

Thanks in advance!

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Yes, you can use more water. Sometimes I go ahead and use 6-8 cups depending on the size of my grain bill if doing a partial mash. Just be sure you're using very cold water when topping off and such. You will have some evaporation during the steep anyway.

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1 minute ago, MRB Josh R said:

Yes, you can use more water. Sometimes I go ahead and use 6-8 cups depending on my grain bill if doing a partial mash. Just be sure you're using very cold water when topping off and such. You will have some evaporation during the steep anyway.

 

Thanks again! I figured as much but wanted to make sure that I was getting the best out of the steep. I always two gallons of refrigerated water on hand for brewing and will be checking the temperature twice before pitching the yeast. 

Now if I could only find the motivation to do some actual work while here at work; it's the first day back after 2 weeks of leave. 

Happy new year!

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On 12/30/2015 at 11:15 AM, MRB Josh R said:

 

4. Hop sack (keep it loose and not packed too tight).

 

Cheers! :D

 

good advice for any situation.  

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This is gold information as my cousin is badgering me to make an Oatmeal Stout and Milk Stout. I suppose I can do a 2.5 gal batch of each after my IPA. Won't be finished in time for St Patrick's day like he's hoping but still, something to shut him up. 

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2 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

I added 6 oz oats to my Weissbier ? great mouth-feel so far 

Likewise.  Tasted my Chocolate Cherry Stout yesterday and it was fantastic.  Good luck with your recipe! :)

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It's no secret that I've been trying to come up with a recipe that clones Goose Island Bourbon County Stout.  It has incredible mouth feel; almost thick.  I want to duplicate that.  Can I use a mixture of lactose, carapils, and oatmeal to achieve this, or should I look to increase a single ingredient?  Thanks in advance.

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Don't use lactose because it's not a milk stout at all. Far from it. The lactose will make the beer too sweet for the style. There's also no oats in it. It's a 14% ABV beer with a LOT of malt in it. You will achieve the mouthfeel with the malt extract on its own.

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Many manufacturers give you some guidance on their website, and Goose Island is no exception.  http://www.gooseisland.com/showBeer.html?name=bourbon-county-brand-stout 

 

You can then Google the name with the word "clone" or "extract clone" after it and see what recipes people have come up with.  I often find recipes that use Hop X when the company says they use Hop Y.  

 

 

Goose Island.JPG

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Josh and Rick, thank you VERY much!  I truly appreciate the information and advice!!!

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Can a guy dump a lb or so of lactose into a 5 gallon keg to get an increased mouthfeel? This kinda goes back to @AnthonyC and his thin stouts. Though an irish stout is supposed to be light bodied i feel like id like it more if it had a "thicker" mouthfeel

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22 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Can a guy dump a lb or so of lactose into a 5 gallon keg to get an increased mouthfeel? This kinda goes back to @AnthonyC and his thin stouts. Though an irish stout is supposed to be light bodied i feel like id like it more if it had a "thicker" mouthfeel


Unless you want a sweet stout, it's best to use maltodextrin instead. Lactose is an unfermentable sugar and will make the beer quite sweet. If you are into milk stouts, I say go for it because it will improve body and mouthfeel, but maltodextrin will do the same thing without changing the flavor.

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5 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:


Unless you want a sweet stout, it's best to use maltodextrin instead. Lactose is an unfermentable sugar and will make the beer quite sweet. If you are into milk stouts, I say go for it because it will improve body and mouthfeel, but maltodextrin will do the same thing without changing the flavor.

So like... i can do this to a finshed beer? Pop open my corny, dump in maltodextrin, cap, purge, shake, serve? I do have some maltodextrin laying around

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19 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

So like... i can do this to a finshed beer? Pop open my corny, dump in maltodextrin, cap, purge, shake, serve? I do have some maltodextrin laying around

 

It's not a good practice to do it, but yes, you can. I would dissolve it in a small amount of very hot water to make a slurry first. This will help it dissolve in the beer instead of just precipitating to the bottom. 

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