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SeabeeJosh

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I'm fermenting my first brew with my new LBK kit my wife (in her words) "wasted the money to buy" me for Christmas, and I couldn't be more excited to taste! The kit came with the Aztec Mexican brew, which I can only assume will be similar to Corona, based on the suggestion of adding a lime wedge while drinking.

 

My question is which refill kits should I buy for similar flavors as Fat Tire and Guiness? I'm not a fan of most mass produced American beers (Bud, Coors, Miller, etc.), but enjoy the bolder flavors of micro brews of the Northwest. What sort of kits can you suggest that are close?

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I would try the St. Patrick stout. Brew it straight the first time to see how it taste and as you get more experience you can make adjustments to get it to taste the way you like it. 

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1 hour ago, SeabeeJosh said:

I'm fermenting my first brew with my new LBK kit my wife (in her words) "wasted the money to buy" me for Christmas, and I couldn't be more excited to taste! The kit came with the Aztec Mexican brew, which I can only assume will be similar to Corona, based on the suggestion of adding a lime wedge while drinking.

 

My question is which refill kits should I buy for similar flavors as Fat Tire and Guiness? I'm not a fan of most mass produced American beers (Bud, Coors, Miller, etc.), but enjoy the bolder flavors of micro brews of the Northwest. What sort of kits can you suggest that are close?

 

I thought the Winter Dark Ale was very close to Guinness.  Bottling St. Patrick Stout Deluxe tonight.

 

Good luck with your brewing adventures.  I have a list of the brews I've done so far below with some ratings.  

 

Kevin

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Winter Dark was very good, but not Guiness in my opinion.  However, since it's discontinued no one will ever know again...  :unsure:

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2 hours ago, SeabeeJosh said:

I'm fermenting my first brew with my new LBK kit my wife (in her words) "wasted the money to buy" me for Christmas, and I couldn't be more excited to taste! The kit came with the Aztec Mexican brew, which I can only assume will be similar to Corona, based on the suggestion of adding a lime wedge while drinking.

 

My question is which refill kits should I buy for similar flavors as Fat Tire and Guiness? I'm not a fan of most mass produced American beers (Bud, Coors, Miller, etc.), but enjoy the bolder flavors of micro brews of the Northwest. What sort of kits can you suggest that are close?

 

I would suggest going with the craft refills, try them and see what you can make that you like from them. Also, the stout & the Oktoberfest seem to be faves around here.

 

I can tell you that I made an IPA out of the Diablo HME, some extra DME, some Carapils, and FF7Cs hops. I also made an imperial coffee stout from the Irish stout can. They were both excellent.

 

:)

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Slym, the first thing you were saying sounds good, but I'll be honest, I have no idea what you said after "Diablo". I am also interested in how you made the imperial coffee stout. I like beer and coffee, and I like Guiness' Espresso Stout, so I'd like to give that a try.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Winter Dark was very good, but not Guiness in my opinion.  However, since it's discontinue no one will ever know again...  :unsure:

 

I've still got 4 cans in the brewing cupboard. I'd be happy to let everyone know as they are conditioned! B):P

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SeabeeJosh (Navy, per chance?  FC1(SW) here), I asked for and received a clone recipe for Fat Tire.  Here is the link -

Once you get some experience with the simple techniques, you can add grain steeps or partial mashes to achieve different things with your beer. I have yet to have any desire to go to all grain as I can make great beer using extracts and steeps/partial mashes.  I watched this video that explains it in case you are worried that it is difficult: 

 

 

Have fun!

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21 hours ago, SeabeeJosh said:

Slym, the first thing you were saying sounds good, but I'll be honest, I have no idea what you said after "Diablo". I am also interested in how you made the imperial coffee stout. I like beer and coffee, and I like Guiness' Espresso Stout, so I'd like to give that a try.

 

Heh - the first part meant that I used some extra malt extract, dry, some steeped grains to improve head & head retention, and that I added my own hops (Falconer's Flight Seven C's) to make a different IPA than the can alone would give me.

 

:)

 

The stout is pretty easy too, but it involves adding DME & steeping grains again. Not a big deal, really. JoshR has a thread about how to do it here on the site somewhere. Here's the recipe ; ask away any questions you might have:

 

Mr. Beer Russian Imperial Stout
----------------------------------------------------
RECIPE INCLUDES:

* 1 Can St. Patrick's Irish Stout
* 3 lb amber DME
* 1 oz Packet Palisade Pellet Hops
* 1 Cup Brown Sugar
* 1/2lb 120L Crystal Malt (in grain bag)
* 1/4lb chocolate malt (in same grain bag)
* 1 oz black patent malt (in same grain bag)


* Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast, rehydrated

 

* 4 oz light-roasted coffee beans, lightly cracked, dry-hopped for last 2-3 days

 

In 5 quarts of water in a pot, place the crystal, black patent, & choc. malt and bring it to 155 degrees and leave it in there for 30min at that temp, then remove the bag (letting it drip but not squeezing). Add 1 lb of amber DME and bring it to a boil. Wait for hot-break, then set timer for 60 minutes. Add 1/2 oz hops. At 7 minutes remaining, add in the Mr. Beer yeast to kill it (makes for good yeast food, bunch of cannibals). At 0 minutes, remove from heat & add remaining hops. Stir in the brown sugar, the Mr. B stout can, and then all the remaining dry extract. Cool to app. 70 degrees, pour it into the fermentor, and then top it off with water to the 2.4 gal. mark, and stir stir stir, take a gravity reading, pitch the yeast, wait 5, stir, then seal and ferment.

 

4 weeks in the fermentor at 60-64 degrees, then 6 months in the bottles.

 

app. 10.5 - 11% ABV, 39 SRM, 75 IBUs
 
I brewed this on 8/8/15, OG 1.090, FG 1.028, actual ABV - 8.14%. Hardly any lasted longer than 2 months - they were that good! The coffee is a little strong at first but will mellow out with time. I have one left, my brew-bro has two. I initially called it Superbowl Stout as that is when they should have been cracked first, but I am determined to have the last one I have stay unopened until the Superbowl.

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7 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Winter Dark was very good.  However, since it's discontinued no one will ever know again...  :unsure:

 

You've got to be kidding? What the hell?

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4 hours ago, slym2none said:

 

Heh - the first part meant that I used some extra malt extract, dry, some steeped grains to improve head & head retention, and that I added my own hops (Falconer's Flight Seven C's) to make a different IPA than the can alone would give me.

 

:)

 

The stout is pretty easy too, but it involves adding DME & steeping grains again. Not a big deal, really. JoshR has a thread about how to do it here on the site somewhere. Here's the recipe ; ask away any questions you might have:

 

Mr. Beer Russian Imperial Stout
----------------------------------------------------
RECIPE INCLUDES:

* 1 Can St. Patrick's Irish Stout
* 3 lb amber DME
* 1 oz Packet Palisade Pellet Hops
* 1 Cup Brown Sugar
* 1/2lb 120L Crystal Malt (in grain bag)
* 1/4lb chocolate malt (in same grain bag)
* 1 oz black patent malt (in same grain bag)


* Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast, rehydrated (3rd gen washed)

 

* 4 oz light-roasted coffee beans, lightly cracked, dry-hopped for last 2-3 days

 

In 5 quarts of water in a pot, place the crystal & choc. malt and bring it to 155 degrees and leave it in there for 30min at that temp, then remove the bag (letting it drip but not squeezing). Add 1 lb of amber DME and bring it to a boil. Wait for hot-break, then set timer for 60 minutes. Add 1/2 oz hops. At 7 minutes remaining, add in the Mr. Beer yeast to kill it (makes for good yeast food, bunch of cannibals). At 0 minutes, remove from heat & add remaining hops. Stir in the brown sugar, the Mr. B stout can, and then all the remaining dry extract. Cool to app. 70 degrees, pour it into the fermentor, and then top it off with water to the 2.4 gal. mark, and stir stir stir, take a gravity reading, pitch the yeast, wait 5, stir, then seal and ferment.

 

4 weeks in the fermentor at 60-64 degrees, then 6 months in the bottles.

 

app. 10.5 - 11% ABV, 39 SRM, 75 IBUs
 
I brewed this on 8/8/15, OG 1.090, FG 1.028, actual ABV - 8.14%. Hardly any lasted longer than 2 months - they were that good! The coffee is a little strong at first but will mellow out with time. I have one left, my brew-bro has two. I initially called it Superbowl Stout as that is when they should have been cracked first, but I am determined to have the last one I have stay unopened until the Superbowl.

Wow! It seems like a lot of work and a lot of science! I'll keep this one stashed away for when I'm a little more experienced and feeling ambitious, I'm still on my first brew, and only a week into fermentation! In other words, I'm not just a Newbie, I'm a NEW Newbie!

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Give it a half a dozen (or so) brews and you'll be cranking out the beers like an old pro. I remember my first few batches took forever because I kept reading the directions between each step. I also had my tablet in my brew room so I could watch the brewing video to make certain that I wasn't missing anything.

 

Before you know it you'll be on the forums answering questions for the next wave of new brewers! :)

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1 hour ago, gophers6 said:

 

You've got to be kidding? What the hell?

That's what I thought! They better have a good reformulation planned, because that was one of their best refills brewed straight up.

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1 hour ago, SeabeeJosh said:

Wow! It seems like a lot of work and a lot of science! I'll keep this one stashed away for when I'm a little more experienced and feeling ambitious, I'm still on my first brew, and only a week into fermentation! In other words, I'm not just a Newbie, I'm a NEW Newbie!

 

It really isn't that bad. Take some water, heat it up to 150-155, dump the specialty grains in and let it sit for 30 minutes. Drain the grain out, and use that water for the boil.

 

But I agree, get a few basic brews out of the way, watch some videos, read this forum (and others - homebrewtalk.com is a good one too), and then you'll be ready to expand your repertoire.

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10 hours ago, jsherman said:

That's what I thought! They better have a good reformulation planned, because that was one of their best refills brewed straight up.

 

I am still waiting to see what the two new Craft Series refills are going to be. JoshR made it sound like us WDA fans will have something to make us happy.

 

 

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