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Zoot Horn Rollo

Going to tackle Baby Got Bock

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    So...New Year, New Brews. My loving and devoted bag of guts went out and ordered me a few Mr. Beer recipes for Xmas. I'm excited because I haven't brewed since October. (Pumpkin Rising, as a matter of fact...turned out okay. Pumpkin spice is not really my thing and, as usual, the beer was as dark as a stout.) I got all hot and bothered about brewing the Baby Got Bock recipe that she ordered (lotsa stuff to mix together on this one), then I read the instructions and my excitement kinda fizzed out. A "true lager" it said. This translates into somehow I'm supposed to keep this stuff sitting at 55F for up to four months before drinking . Or do I? Is the 55 degree temp requirement just until the lager has carbed or for the whole conditioning period? I've mastered the art of using a camping cooler to keep temperatures constant during fermentation but, I really don't want to babysit 11 bottles of beer with ice packs for almost half a year.  My question is, once the pet bottles carb fully and firm up, can I stop worrying about the temperature and just store them like other brews?

 

Best, Zoot 

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After conditioning is complete, thats when you hold a lager at lager temps. So the answer to your question is yes, you want to hold the lager in the mid 50's for the 4 to 6 months. :(

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afaik, the brewing a lager process is to

1 - ferment at around 55F (3 wks) 

1a - D-rest 3 days

2 - carb at 70F (2 wks)(*do not carb at 55F - it'll take forever),

3 - then condition or 'lager' at fermenting temperatures for a very long time (16 to 20 wks).  

 

The last part is not mandatory, you can condition at 70F, and the beer will still be good.  You just might not get the full crisp and clean tasting lager possible with cold conditioning. I made the 2014 Seasonal Doppelbock like this, and it turned out great.  

 

also, read up on diacetyl resting at the tail end of fermentation.   

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5 hours ago, scouterbill said:

By the way, welcome back.

        Thanks scouterbill, It's good to be brewing again. Nothing like a few bubbling LBK's to make the winter seem warmer.

 

Best, Zoot

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3 hours ago, cowboykyle said:

afaik, the brewing a lager process is to

1 - ferment at around 55F (3 wks) 

1a - D-rest 3 days

2 - carb at 70F (2 wks)(*do not carb at 55F - it'll take forever),

3 - then condition or 'lager' at fermenting temperatures for a very long time (16 to 20 wks).  

 

The last part is not mandatory, you can condition at 70F, and the beer will still be good.  You just might not get the full crisp and clean tasting lager possible with cold conditioning. I made the 2014 Seasonal Doppelbock like this, and it turned out great.  

 

also, read up on diacetyl resting at the tail end of fermentation.   

  

  Okay, now this is the giggity!! Thank you Cowboykyle for the hot flash lowdown on this Baby Bock caper. Diacetyl rest? Look here, I'm no Muldoon, I'll sleep when I'm dead. Now let's hope I don't screw it up or it's a one way ticket to Palookaville.

 

Best, Zoot

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14 minutes ago, Zoot Horn Rollo said:

        Thanks scouterbill, It's good to be brewing again. Nothing like a few bubbling LBK's to make the winter seem warmer.

 

Best, Zoot

 

How cold can it be in San Diego County? ? Southern Illinois in January, that's cold. ?

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Don't let it scare you Zoot. Conditioning it at 55º is best, but I conditioned the helles bock in my basement around 64º for a couple months and it came out great. I fermented in the spring so it was easier for me to keep the temps low.

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