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Glass Longneck Bottle- How do I know when carbonation is complete?

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First time brewer and just purchased long neck glass bottles with capping system for my first batch. With the plastic bottles, you can squeeze the bottle and feel for carbonation, in glass, you obviously can not. 

 

I brewed a Diablo IPA. I believe it states to let it sit for 2-3 weeks more after bottling but what if needs more and I don't want to waste any beer.

 

How would I know when it is ready?

 

 

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If your beer isn't carbed after 3 weeks, and it's not some super-high ABV brew, then something has gone wrong. Wait three weeks and you'll be fine.

 

A lot of people will put one beer in a plastic bottle (soda bottle if not a MrB PET bottle) just to get an idea when things are carbed up, and the rest in glass, if bottling.

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6 minutes ago, slym2none said:

If your beer isn't carbed after 3 weeks, and it's not some super-high ABV brew, then something has gone wrong. Wait three weeks and you'll be fine.

 

A lot of people will put one beer in a plastic bottle (soda bottle if not a MrB PET bottle) just to get an idea when things are carbed up, and the rest in glass, if bottling.

 

I like the idea of putting one beer in a plastic bottle (740ml MrB bottle) that came with my kit and put the rest in glass bottles. Now, does it matter if its the first bottle or the last bottle of my batch when I use the plastic for carbo testing? I don't know if the last bottle, maybe cause it it has more yeast, would carbo up faster than the rest (I read this in someone thread).

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Nope, it doesn't matter at all. Just make sure you get the proper amount of priming sugar in the larger bottle. The larger bottle also might take a bit longer to carb up than the 12oz glass ones, but hey - that way you are assured they are carbed properly if the bigger bottle is done.

 

:)

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Just now, slym2none said:

Nope, it doesn't matter at all. Just make sure you get the proper amount of priming sugar in the larger bottle. The larger bottle also might take a bit longer to carb up than the 12oz galss ones, but hey - that way you are assured they are carbed properly if the bigger bottle is done.

 

:)

 

Exactly! Makes total sense! Bigger volume, more space for carbonation to fill up. I love science and chemistry! This is why I found my new hobby.

 

For sure on the 12 oz bottles, add 3/4 tsp of sugar on the 740 ml add 2 tsp of sugar. Got priming and conditioning down!  

 

Thanks again for your help! Happy Brewing!

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If you don't want to waste beer, follow the 3-4 rules.  4 weeks carbonating and conditioning, temp 70 or above.  

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1 minute ago, RickBeer said:

If you don't want to waste beer, follow the 3-4 rules.  4 weeks carbonating and conditioning, temp 70 or above.  

 

^^True dat!! B)

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One note:  the amounts on the MrBeer priming sugar chart tend to be a bit high.  Very early in my MrB brewing career, I started using 2/3 to 3/4 of the amounts from that chart.  The recommendation is for 3/4 tsp for a 12 oz bottle; you might try 1/2 tsp instead.  These days, I bottle in 22 oz glass bombers and use 1 carb drop per bottle for most styles; so far, everything has carbonated perfectly.

 

As for the amount of time it takes to carb, the 4-week conditioning rule of thumb has served many of us well, although I started drinking my Diabolical IPA at three weeks as that style is best while the hop presence is still fresh.  The beer will be fully carbonated long before then.  

 

Patience is the best virtue a homebrewer can have.

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then there is the old tried and true method of opening a bottle and finding out!  one at week two, one at week three, etc... even if the beer isn't fully carbed early on, it'll still be good :)

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16 minutes ago, slym2none said:

If it gets drank, it ain't wasted beer, I say!

 

:D

True dat ^^ 

 

the most valuable beers are the ones that teach you a lesson. Lots of lessons for a been to learn 

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if you're still not sure, and by then u think you've wasted your beer, message me, and i'll post my address so u can ship it to me, this month is free shipping.......

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19 hours ago, MichaelL said:

One note:  the amounts on the MrBeer priming sugar chart tend to be a bit high.  Very early in my MrB brewing career, I started using 2/3 to 3/4 of the amounts from that chart.  The recommendation is for 3/4 tsp for a 12 oz bottle; you might try 1/2 tsp instead.  These days, I bottle in 22 oz glass bombers and use 1 carb drop per bottle for most styles; so far, everything has carbonated perfectly.

 

As for the amount of time it takes to carb, the 4-week conditioning rule of thumb has served many of us well, although I started drinking my Diabolical IPA at three weeks as that style is best while the hop presence is still fresh.  The beer will be fully carbonated long before then.  

 

Patience is the best virtue a homebrewer can have.

 

So for the 740ml that says 2 tsp of sugar, I would add 1 and 1/2 tsp? Just add a little less, right?

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Now that I think about it, IPA tend to have a lot of head. Wouldn't adding the 3/4 tsp of sugar be creating the head I want or would the 1/2 your suggesting do the same?

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Hi Cuban.  I'm drinking an IPA that I made about 8wks ago, and I put about 1.5tsp of sugar in it instead of 2tsp.  I used the 740ml plastic bottles for this batch.  I have to say that compared to my other IPA's where I used 2tsp of sugar, this one has the perfect amount of carbonation and is the best.  Just a heads up.  Good luck.

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Thanks Anthony! I too have read somewhere through these threads that the MrB priming chart might be a little to high. The way I see it the more I hear things repeated, the more it has to be true. This goes for bad things too! :lol:

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13 minutes ago, Cuban IPA said:

Now that I think about it, IPA tend to have a lot of head. Wouldn't adding the 3/4 tsp of sugar be creating the head I want or would the 1/2 your suggesting do the same?

 

No.  Because you're confusing CARBONATION with head.  They aren't the same.  You can have a highly carbonated beer that produces no head.  In fact, MOST of the Mr. Beer batches won't have any head, people steep Carapils or Carafoam, or add wheat LME/DME to increase head.

 

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I always thought that carbonation is what gives beer its head? Boy, do I have a lot to learn still. <_<

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Yes, you do.  :lol:  We all did.  That's why I strongly recommend to a new brewer that they start their first batch, and then WHILE IT'S BREWING they READ.  READ.  Then READ SOME MORE.  Guess where I got all my amazing (cough, cough) knowledge?  Right here on this forum (most of it).  I did the same as any noob - charged ahead - and made mistakes.  Then I read, and read, and read.  9 out of every 10 things you think to ask are answered here already, because some noob last year, or the year before or the year before asked the same thing.  Or did the same stupid thing.  And you might find that idiot was me.

 

Read the info in my signature.  It's designed to LESSEN THE PAIN.  Not perfect, you'll still make mistakes (I do).  But this forum provides a wealth of knowledge for new brewers.  And if you ignore the info from you-know-who (:lol::lol:), it's even better...

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13 minutes ago, Cuban IPA said:

I always thought that carbonation is what gives beer its head? Boy, do I have a lot to learn still. <_<

 

This is only partly true. It's things like gluten and dextrins that cause head. Carbonation simply promotes it. Take hard cider, for example. It usually doesn't have a head because it lacks glutens and dextrins, which are both found in grains. Adding something like maltodextrin will promote head, but without a good amount of gluten or other dextrins to accompany it, the head won't last long.

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Got it! So then for future references, if I want head in my beer, always add a packet of MrB LME Pale to my boiling mixture?

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53 minutes ago, Cuban IPA said:

Got it! So then for future references, if I want head in my beer, always add a packet of MrB LME Pale to my boiling mixture?

 

It definitely helps! :)

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2 hours ago, Cuban IPA said:

Got it! So then for future references, if I want head in my beer, always add a packet of MrB LME Pale to my boiling mixture?

 

When you get a bit further, if you go there at all, you can steep 4 oz of Carapils to help with head & head retention.

 

:)

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6 hours ago, Cuban IPA said:

Thanks Anthony! I too have read somewhere through these threads that the MrB priming chart might be a little to high. The way I see it the more I hear things repeated, the more it has to be true. This goes for bad things too! :lol:

Rule of thumb is 1 oz dextrose per us gallon

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3 hours ago, slym2none said:

 

When you get a bit further, if you go there at all, you can steep 4 oz of Carapils to help with head & head retention.

 

:)

 

Yeah when I get there but its good to know. I read that somewhere else too! Thanks!

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maltodextrin works too, it is a non-fermentable sugar that you can add to your boil, about 2 oz  per gallon... 

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8 minutes ago, cowboykyle said:

maltodextrin works too, it is a non-fermentable sugar that you can add to your boil, about 2 oz  per gallon... 

while I agree with that, I have found grain gets some what better results.

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