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MnMBeer

Experimenting with Yeast

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Hi Folks,

 

I am slowly progressing into the novice/intermediate brewer domain. I have a dozen or so batches under my belt and starting to explore different types of yeast.

 

The SA-05 which is supplied with most of MR. Beer kits has been an easy introductory yeast for most recipes. It provides an easy method for brewing in most ambient temperatures.

 

Past experience with T-58 from Belgian spiced Ale was fair but since switching to a fridge fermenter has yielded some stronger results, I actually had Krausen overflow. I brewed Winter dark Ale and Imperial Red Ale with the T-58. Conditioning should be complete by the end of the month. No brainstorming adjuncts this time. straight up.

 

Now fermenting is Belgian Spiced Ale and Oktoberfest with Sa- 04 Notty. The date is good for 10/16 I believe but it is not performing as well as thought. I did not get a strong High Klausen nor temp swing as expected. The yeast had trails along the lower sides of the LBK but it never blew off the top so to speak. Notty Likes 59 - 65. I wonder if a secondary ferment will help or I am getting anal with a new yeast.

 

tempsso4.jpg.82900fb98c859583a709e855773

 

I use an 8" probe down to the center of the LBK through the lid. The infrared temp gun confirms.

Should I bring the temp down a bit or stay steady?

 

If this yeast performs well then I am going to test some lager recipes in the future.

 

 

 

 

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Mr.  Beer yeast is not S-05.  S-04 and Notty are not the same.  Temp is fine for either. 2.5 gallons may overflow,  2.13 gallons rarely does. 

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19 hours ago, MnMBeer said:

Hi Folks,

 

I am slowly progressing into the novice/intermediate brewer domain. I have a dozen or so batches under my belt and starting to explore different types of yeast.

 

The SA-05 which is supplied with most of MR. Beer kits has been an easy introductory yeast for most recipes. It provides an easy method for brewing in most ambient temperatures.

 

Past experience with T-58 from Belgian spiced Ale was fair but since switching to a fridge fermenter has yielded some stronger results, I actually had Krausen overflow. I brewed Winter dark Ale and Imperial Red Ale with the T-58. Conditioning should be complete by the end of the month. No brainstorming adjuncts this time. straight up.

 

Now fermenting is Belgian Spiced Ale and Oktoberfest with Sa- 04 Notty. The date is good for 10/16 I believe but it is not performing as well as thought. I did not get a strong High Klausen nor temp swing as expected. The yeast had trails along the lower sides of the LBK but it never blew off the top so to speak. Notty Likes 59 - 65. I wonder if a secondary ferment will help or I am getting anal with a new yeast.

 

tempsso4.jpg.82900fb98c859583a709e855773

 

I use an 8" probe down to the center of the LBK through the lid. The infrared temp gun confirms.

Should I bring the temp down a bit or stay steady?

 

If this yeast performs well then I am going to test some lager recipes in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

What is SA-05? :blink:

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I suspect that when he said SA-05, he actually meant Fermentis US-05 (and when he said SA-04, I suspect he meant Fermentis S-04.

 

T-58 is a spicy yeast, probably best suited for things like Belgians (and you may want to ferment at higher temps to really bring out the flavors it can contribute. I know that if you reach into the fridge, pull out the pink US-05 packet to make an APA, if you don't actually look at the label and it turns out to be the T-58, you end up with an interesting (not sure if it was interesting in a good way) beer.

 

US-05 is the "Chico" strain (WLP001 and Wyeast 1056 are the liquid versions). As a side note, when I first bought US-05, it was US-56. I've read that Wyeast sued Fermentis over the name and that's why it was renamed US-05.

 

S-04 is more of an English strain.

 

I don't know what the yeast is that ships with the Mr Beer kits, but I suspect (for a variety of reasons) that it's likely Cooper's ale yeast. If so, it's a good yeast that is very forgiving of higher fermentation temperatures.

 

Nottingham is a good yeast to use if you're going to be brewing at fairly low temperatures (it's good for other purposes, also, but it's especially well suited to low temperatures). For example, I keep my house pretty cool in the winter (57 during the day and 50 at night) and ferment in my basement. The temperatures in the basement are cooler than the rest of the house during the day, but don't drop as much at night. The fermenters sit on the floor, so it's even cooler. Nottingham has a lower range of 57 (and I've read that they claim down to 54 with higher pitch rates), so it does just fine for me and I get very clean beers from it. When you brew at the low end of its range, you can get "lager like" beers. They're still ales, but it's such a clean fermentation, that it's a lot like a lager (I sometimes call these lagales). A lot of places seem to call it an English ale yeast, but I use it for APAs and American IPAs. As a side note, a few years ago, they had some packaging issues on a couple of batches and people were getting poor results. It became unavailable for a while as Danstar/Lallemand took the packing in house. It's now vacuum sealed and I've never had problems with it since they repackaged it.

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On 1/19/2016 at 8:47 PM, bpgreen said:

It became unavailable for a while as Danstar/Lallemand took the packing in house. It's now vacuum sealed and I've never had problems with it since they repackaged it.

 

I just got one of the vacuum packages of Notty, and the directions on the back say to rehydrate it before using, in 86-92 degree water. Is this necessary?

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I am thinking about using Saffbrew S-33 to make an abbey ale (using the Abbey Dubbel recipe). How do you guys think that will turn out?

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3 minutes ago, Dave Barleycorn said:

 

I just got one of the vacuum packages of Notty, and the directions on the back say to rehydrate it before using, in 86-92 degree water. Is this necessary?

Necessary? No. Best practice? Yes. If you sprinkle yeast directly on wort, about half will die. If you rehydrate first, far fewer will die.

 

But many people make good beer without rehydrating dry yeast.

 

Also, if you're making a Mr Beer sized batch, if you use a full packet of Nottingham, even if half die, you'll have plenty of yeast.

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5 minutes ago, Dave Barleycorn said:

I am thinking about using Saffbrew S-33 to make an abbey ale (using the Abbey Dubbel recipe). How do you guys think that will turn out?

 

Very differently from what is expected. T-58 and S-33 are very different yeasts with very different characteristics. T-58 is a specialty yeast that imparts spicy flavors. S-33 is more of a general purpose yeast that is relatively neutral.

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If you rehydrate please remember;  You just don't dump the yeast in the wort. Any more than you'd just dump fish in an aquarium, and for exactly the same reason. It must be acclimatized, the process should take some 10 or 15 min.   

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14 hours ago, bpgreen said:

 

Very differently from what is expected. T-58 and S-33 are very different yeasts with very different characteristics. T-58 is a specialty yeast that imparts spicy flavors. S-33 is more of a general purpose yeast that is relatively neutral.

 

Also, S-33 doesn't attenuate as well as T-58. T-58 will give you a drier beer, while S-33 will leave some residual sweetness. I think the T-58 is more to style for an Abbey style ale.

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4 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Also, S-33 doesn't attenuate as well as T-58. T-58 will give you a drier beer, while S-33 will leave some residual sweetness. I think the T-58 is more to style for an Abbey style ale.

Is there a list somewhere that states what yeast strain does what to beer. And what styles theyre typically used for?  Flavor Profiles etc?

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20 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Is there a list somewhere that states what yeast strain does what to beer. And what styles theyre typically used for?  Flavor Profiles etc?

 

Here's a doc I made awhile back. You're welcome to check it out anytime:

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-uy8-nK0HQeKWIIHmi8ZhFfM4jYD_m-rkidsuGQEU8U/edit?usp=sharing

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32 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Here's a doc I made awhile back. You're welcome to check it out anytime:

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-uy8-nK0HQeKWIIHmi8ZhFfM4jYD_m-rkidsuGQEU8U/edit?usp=sharing

That is one of the most impressive things I've ever seen. I printed it and it shall go in my beer diary, and I will cherish it. Thank you. 

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Just now, Creeps McLane said:

That is one of the most impressive things I've ever seen. I printed it and it shall go in my beer diary, and I will cherish it. Thank you. 

 

Keep in mind that I update it every so often when new yeast strains come on the market. The updates aren't that often, but it helps to check back every few months. I have one for hops, too:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/11GCu5NxT5UYQVFN6VpukG_4T_GS_MSwr7fESWgtXAUg/edit?usp=sharing

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11 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Keep in mind that I update it every so often when new yeast strains come on the market. The updates aren't that often, but it helps to check back every few months. I have one for hops, too:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/11GCu5NxT5UYQVFN6VpukG_4T_GS_MSwr7fESWgtXAUg/edit?usp=sharing

So.... You do all the hard work and I can just come and steal your knowledge and you're ok with that??? That's awesome. If only you could put years of brewing experience in a document for me

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Just now, Creeps McLane said:

So.... You do all the hard work and I can just come and steal your knowledge and you're ok with that??? That's awesome. If only you could put years of brewing experience in a document for me

 

Well, I was thinking about writing a book on brewing some day. ;)

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4 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Well, I was thinking about writing a book on brewing some day. ;)

Well you have about 700 people on the forum that would buy it in a heart beat. DO IT!!!! I think you have great insight and know a lot of things that 90% of us would never think of. How this affects that and how flavors would pair together. That's real knowledge. Ill

pre order as soon as you say I can. Take my money 

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MnMbeer - too many variables to use "high krausen" as an indicator of how well a yeast is "working" As pointed out, some yeast varieties attenuate more than others, some add a hint of spice, fruit or even sulfur. Good winter project to read about the different yeasts and experiment.

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Thanks Folks for the replies,

I just happened to check my spam folder and Viola.

This is the yeast most recently used.

http://heartshomebrew.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_58&products_id=272

 

Appreciate your thoughts, week 2 fermentation is coming and it will be time for dry hopping the Belgian Spice Ale and some Whole cherry pitless muskegon. for the Oktoberfest. Last week some say to raise the temperature a couple or few degrees for dactyl cleanse. Any objections or recommendations? 

Cheers

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1 hour ago, MnMBeer said:

Thanks Folks for the replies,

I just happened to check my spam folder and Viola.

This is the yeast most recently used.

http://heartshomebrew.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_58&products_id=272

 

Appreciate your thoughts, week 2 fermentation is coming and it will be time for dry hopping the Belgian Spice Ale and some Whole cherry pitless muskegon. for the Oktoberfest. Last week some say to raise the temperature a couple or few degrees for dactyl cleanse. Any objections or recommendations? 

Cheers

 

There's no need for a diacetyl rest unless you're using a lager yeast at lager temps. The Nottingham yeast is a great neutral yeast that produces little to no diacetyl.

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