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MrWhy

Coopers 6 Gallon Kit in LBK???

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Hello everyone!

 

New brewer who just started in December. I've got an American Ale bottled and conditioning. When I tasted it at bottling it was absolutely terrible. A dry, cidery taste that probably came about because I thought adding some table sugar and honey was a good idea. Time will tell! I have the seasonal ESB in the fermenter waiting to bottle and I just brewed up something that I am not sure what it is. (I have two LBKs. I go all in.) (It was an American Ale + smooth DME + Golden LME + some hops and T-58).

 

A quick question - I was perusing amazon and noticed that there are some Coopers extract kits. Specifically a dark ale designed to brew 6 gallons. Is it possible to just brew this using the LBK and making 2.5 gallons? It seems like it would be because some of the recipes I see have two Mr. Beer kits and/or extra malts.

 

Any thoughts? 

 

Thank you all!

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ive got a coopers Australian ale waiting to be brewed. it's a 6 gallon recipe, probably in reality makes close to 5 gallons. but you have to add adjuncts to it, such as dextrin and dried malt extract to complete the process, and those are sold separately. if you decided to use only as a 2.5 gal. recipe, I cannot imagine how it would turn out? probably too malty/hoppy? if you're going to invest into the coopers brand I would go by their instructions and brew the proper amount specified.

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You could use the Coopers malt but it takes a little adjustment by cutting the malt down to the amount you plan to brew then storing the rest. Its not recommended for the New Brewers because of the level of expertise we have when first starting this adventure of brewing. If you still want to try I'm sure there are threads on this and other sites explaining how to do it.

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10 hours ago, MrWhy said:

Hello everyone!

 

New brewer who just started in December. I've got an American Ale bottled and conditioning. When I tasted it at bottling it was absolutely terrible. A dry, cidery taste that probably came about because I thought adding some table sugar and honey was a good idea. Time will tell! I have the seasonal ESB in the fermenter waiting to bottle and I just brewed up something that I am not sure what it is. (I have two LBKs. I go all in.) (It was an American Ale + smooth DME + Golden LME + some hops and T-58).

 

A quick question - I was perusing amazon and noticed that there are some Coopers extract kits. Specifically a dark ale designed to brew 6 gallons. Is it possible to just brew this using the LBK and making 2.5 gallons? It seems like it would be because some of the recipes I see have two Mr. Beer kits and/or extra malts.

 

Any thoughts? 

 

Thank you all!

 

Adding table sugar was a bad idea.  Honey isn't a bad idea, depending on how much you add and when you add it.  

 

As John1801 stated, new brewers should consider following the directions carefully for their first few brews, learning process and what the refills taste like as is, before making changes.  And when making changes, you should know what the proposed change is going to do when you do it.  This hobby has a huge dropout rate from people that don't get the result they expect and quit.

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Thank you everyone. I shall skip this idea for now. Next batch or two ...(or ten!) are going to be by the book.

 

It was my general thought that my first couple of batches were going to be confusing and crazy and probably not turn out spectacular anyways! So if these turn out a bit wonky....it was all part of the learning. And if they end of drinkable...bonus!

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I've been thinking along the same lines, but looking many batches down the road to even think about trying something different. Even then, it'd be to work with some established and successful recipes and to do some occasional larger batches and slightly more advanced techniques (partial mash). 


The question of splitting a larger batch into several LBK's is a useful one though, and I know that several of the experienced brewers here do something along those lines. Here's what I've been thinking about (and, to reiterate, not for a while and not until I feel comfortable with the routine): 

 

Make a 6 gallon batch and split it up into 3 LBKs for primary. After 2 weeks, those 3 could be dispensed into 2 clean LBKs (yes, I have 5 now...that's another story) for a week of secondary and cold-crashing or maybe even longer of lagering. That should clean up the beer very nicely and maximize yield. Those 2 could be dispensed into a big bucket for batch-priming and bottling. 
The benefits I see are that the operations that require larger, more cumbersome equipment - mashing, boiling, brewing and bottling - are shortest duration. The parts of the process that require something sitting around for weeks are broken up into smaller, much more easily accommodated containers (I don't have anywhere to cold-crash a carboy, but fitting a couple of LBKs in my fridge is easy). At the end, everything gets blended and primed together so that it insures consistency across the whole batch. Maybe a lot of not absolutely necessary handling, but I think it might be a way to use less elaborate equipment to maximum advantage for upping the quality of the brew.

 

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Flaws in the plan.

 

3 becomes 2?  How do you see that?  6 gallons won't fit in 2 LBKs.  Make a 5 gallon batch and split it into 2.5 gallons in each LBK.

 

Secondaries are not needed.

 

Combining at the end can be done - but there is no reason to do that either.  Either get a 2.5 gallon slimline or bottle via a clean LBK.

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3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

3 becomes 2?  How do you see that?  6 gallons won't fit in 2 LBKs.  Make a 5 gallon batch and split it into 2.5 gallons in each LBK.

Was thinking that close to 3 gallons would just fit into the LBK filled to the top (as long as it's not in robust fermentation) and that having to leave a half-pint or more of beer and trub in each primary would account for the difference. Does the 2 1/2 gallons fit comfortably without over-foaming? I guess if temps can be kept at a minimum it wouldn't be a problem. 

As you say, secondary/keg conditioning not strictly necessary, but I do like the idea of batch priming...maybe eventually.

 

Thanks again for all your patient indulgence and advice.

 

 

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I assume you mean Trub.

 

You cannot fit 3 gallons - 2.5 works fine unless you ferment too warm or use an active yeast like Nottingham with a lat of malt.  

 

 

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3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

I assume you mean Trub.

 

Yeah...that...spellcheck doesn't know much about homebrewing. :unsure:

 

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RickBeer, have you actually made any of the Coopers cans? How did they compare to the Mr. Beer cans, they aren't exactly the same are they? Also if you did do a split 5 gallon batch instead of a 6 gallon batch I'm assuming they'd be just be a little bit stronger flavor, aroma & abv?

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The only non-Mr. Beer HME I did was a Munton's Nut Brown.  Most people make the 6 gallon HME cans that recommend adding 2.2 pounds of sugar into 5 gallon batches with LME or DME instead of sugar.  

 

You can determine ABV, IBUs, and SRM by using a tool like QBrew.

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I did split a Mr Beer Seasonal into  2 LBK batches, giving each half extra malt and stuff to make it up to a 2+ gal recipe each LBK. A

little bit of work but not bad. The seasonal had enough basic bitterness for this for what I wanted.

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