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I've been working on a recipe for an Oatmeal Stout, here's what I've come up with. I plan to make it this weekend any comments or suggestions would be appreciated .

 

Oatmeal Stout    

 

Recipe Characteristics via QBrew

Recipe OG    1.069    

Estimated FG    1.017        

Recipe Bitterness    40 IBU

ABV    6.7%            

Recipe Color     60° SRM         

 

Ingredients

 

1.87 lb    Mr. Beer St. Patrick’s Irish Stout

4 oz        Flaked Oats

4 oz        Chocolate Malt

4 oz        Barley

1.5 lb      Briess Dark DME

1 pkt       Mr. Beer Yeast

 

I plan on steeping the grains in 4 qt of water at 160 for 30min.

Rinsing with 2 qt of hot tap water

Then bringing the pot to boil and adding the DME.

Remove from heat and add the St Patricks HME

Adding to the LBK topping of the water and letting it cool to 65 or lower

Pitch the Mr. Beer Yeast

 

I was also thinking about adding 1 tbs of coca powder to increase the Chocolate flavor.

 

Again I'd appreciate any comments.

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Flaked oats are not steepable and require a mash. Im pretty sure the chocolate malt requires a mash as well. As far as the chocolate, a dark candi syrup addition might be better. Recipe i did also called for a molasses  addition at flameout. I have a oatmeal stout partial mash that is bottled and will be ready to drink in 2 weeks. there is a steepable oats product out there btw. Recipe tasted nice even at bottling so should be good.

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MY mistake, chocolate malt does not require a mash, but flaked oats still does.

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Oats do not 'require' a mash. You need to mash them if you want to convert the starch, but they will contribute mouthfeel to the recipe with a steep. I agree, this will benefit from a hop addition. Fuggles is a good choice. Instead of doing a hot tap water sparge, you might want to add that water to your steep to make up for the water loss from the oats. 

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4 hours ago, scouterbill said:

Oats do not 'require' a mash. You need to mash them if you want to convert the starch, but they will contribute mouthfeel to the recipe with a steep. I agree, this will benefit from a hop addition. Fuggles is a good choice. Instead of doing a hot tap water sparge, you might want to add that water to your steep to make up for the water loss from the oats. 

So you both recommended adding Fuggle hops, do you think they are really needed? I ask for 2 reasons according to Qbrew my bitterness is right on the top of the range for an oatmeal stout, and I'm not much a fan of hoppy beer, I'd rather have rich & creamy.

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If I were to add hops, I wouldn't do a boil. I would want to add flavor and aroma so I would do a hop stand, that way I wouldn't get bitterness. But that's just me. 

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5 hours ago, brybry said:

So you both recommended adding Fuggle hops, do you think they are really needed? I ask for 2 reasons according to Qbrew my bitterness is right on the top of the range for an oatmeal stout, and I'm not much a fan of hoppy beer, I'd rather have rich & creamy.

 

10 hours ago, scouterbill said:

Oats do not 'require' a mash. You need to mash them if you want to convert the starch, but they will contribute mouthfeel to the recipe with a steep. I agree, this will benefit from a hop addition. Fuggles is a good choice. Instead of doing a hot tap water sparge, you might want to add that water to your steep to make up for the water loss from the oats. 

My first thaught is im not sure why you wouldn't use the oats the way they are intended to be used and try to get the most out of your grains and recipe. In the end it's your recipe and you can do whatever you want. My second thaugt is the fuggles are a bittering hop would normally be incorporated with a 60 minute boil. I doubt you would get much out of them by addding at flameout.

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2 hours ago, kraig927 said:

My second thaugt is the fuggles are a bittering hop would normally be incorporated with a 60 minute boil. I doubt you would get much out of them by addding at flameout.

 

It all depends on what you want from the hop. If you want the bittering, 60 minute boil. If you want flavor and aroma, 20 minutes or less, or a hop stand, or dry hopping. 

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This hit the LBK last night with 2 minor changes.

 

First I ended up only using 3 qt of water to steep the grains. Mainly I did this when I realized that 4 qt, plus 2 qt to rinse, would have almost filled my brew pot. And would have given little room to add and boil the DME and then the HME. Even cutting back to 3 & 2 made the boil difficult. I need to start using a bigger pot.

 

Second even after sitting my brew pot outside for about 30 minutes to cool, once I added it to the water in the LBK it was still at about 85 degrees and only made it down to 72 when I finally pitched around midnight. I hope this didn't kill my yeast, more later on this.

 

I also decided to skip the coca powder.

 

Finally I forgot, it was midnight and I had sampled a few other beers by the time I was ready to pitch, to get an OG reading. So when I checked the LBK at 7 this morning seeing little or no yeast activity I decided to take a OG reading. I got 1.066 at 68 degrees. BTW the sample had a really nice flavor and really creamy texture.

 

So with little or no yeast activity how much could my OG been affected in 7 hours? And if when I check the LBK this evening if I still see little to no yeast activity do I just pitch a second pack of Mr. Beer Yeast?

 

 

 

 

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First, you used way more water than you needed to, both for steeping and for rinsing.  72 is fine for pitching yeast, why would you think that it isn't?  

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I thought I saw in another thread, of course I can't find it now, the recommendation to use 6 qt. How much would you have used for 12 oz of grains?

 

It's not so much that I think 72 is too high, I've pitched at 72 before, but more related to not seeing any signs of activity this morning. Which may just be that I was perving my beer to soon, which I did because I forgot to take an OG reading last night.

 

 

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Yes, you were perving your beer too soon...  :lol:

 

For a pound of grain you would use 1.5 quarts or so.  

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19 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Yes, you were perving your beer too soon...  :lol:

 

Confirmed! I was perving too soon.  :wub:

I checked the LBK last evening and I had nice krausen starting, this morning it looks like I'm getting close to a blow out :D

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So I just found out i'm heading out of town on Tuesday morning, three weeks from the brew date and when I had planned on cold crashing this brew. So I'm looking for some input. Would it be best to cold crash this tomorrow at 18 days and bottle on Monday or wait an extra week till day 25 to cold crash? I just to a SP reading and for 1.024 @ 60

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Cold crash on Tuesday morning, bottle when you come home.

Hadn't thought of that. No problems with the extended Cold crash?

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Bottled over the weekend but my FG reading only made it to 1.023 @ 60. What causes this all my other brews that I've done using the Mr Beer yeast have hit the 1.009 to 1.007 range mostly all 1.008, is the steeping of grains adding non-fermentable sugars? 

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1 minute ago, brybry said:

Bottled over the weekend but my FG reading only made it to 1.023 @ 60. What causes this all my other brews that I've done using the Mr Beer yeast have hit the 1.009 to 1.007 range mostly all 1.008, is the steeping of grains adding non-fermentable sugars? 

 

Yes, it is. Plus I'm sure the dark DME most likely also has some residual unfermentable sugars from the crystal malts it most likely has in it.

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BTW, sample tasting notes are. Great overall flavor with a thick mouthfeel with a strong, possibly too strong, Chocolate flavor. Ends with a nice bitter, like bitter chocolate after taste. I can't wait to try this in a few weeks and beyond. This very well may be a recipe that I brew regularly and keep on hand.

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1 hour ago, brybry said:

BTW, sample tasting notes are. Great overall flavor with a thick mouthfeel with a strong, possibly too strong, Chocolate flavor. Ends with a nice bitter, like bitter chocolate after taste. I can't wait to try this in a few weeks and beyond. This very well be a recipe that I brew regularly and keep on hand.

 

That chocolate flavor will most likely dissipate a bit with time, bringing it some balance.

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