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Bighead beer

Yeast

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Quick question peeps, how many grams ina Mr beer yeast packet,don't have a scale yet,and I know one of my brew brothers will know!

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I didn't measure the Mr Beer packs, but they're sized for the 2+ gallon batches and so are probably half the size or so of dry yeast packets from Fermatis which are 11.5 grams. I recently used half of those packs (5-6 grams) for some LBK batches and they krausened very well. I'd surmise that the MrBeer yeast is somewhere in the 6 gram range.

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Sorry I'm late. If your asking so you know how much yeast you need, then I'd like to point pout a whole 11.5g pack in an LBK batch is not going to hurt anything.

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Thanks Jim but just needed to know the weight of the Mr beer packet,researching different yeast and the flavors they lend to different beers,very very fascinating, and my mind starts in on blending this and that,its like a train wreck waiting to happen lol,I'm always thinking,I drive the ole lady crazy

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Yeast for brewing vary widely in their contribution to the beer's taste and aroma. Moreover, the same yeast under different conditions change their flavor and aroma profile. Researching and experimenting can certainly keep you busy!

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What's your thoughts Brian on combining 2or more yeast strains to obtain different flavors, providing they both work well in the same temp range?

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50 minutes ago, Bighead beer said:

What's your thoughts Brian on combining 2or more yeast strains to obtain different flavors, providing they both work well in the same temp range?

 

That's been done before and there are even yeast blends available. But there's more involved than just temperature range. You may use the same amount of two different yeasts and end up with 90% of fermentation from one strain and 10% from the other.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Why would you combine yeasts when you don't know how each works separately?

For science? :lol:

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I would not combine yeasts. Combining yeast is not like combining colors, that is, red and white are not always pink. Try each separably, get to "know" the yeast, try them with different recipes and have fun learning. Using different yeasts, in the same wort split between two LBK, can be a great way to see the differences. 

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3 hours ago, Brian N. said:

I would not combine yeasts. Combining yeast is not like combining colors, that is, red and white are not always pink. Try each separably, get to "know" the yeast, try them with different recipes and have fun learning. Using different yeasts, in the same wort split between two LBK, can be a great way to see the differences. 

I agree up to a point i.e. a traditional cream ale is suppose to use both ale and lager yeasts(makes for an interesting flavor) I will agree that it's not for beginners as you need an understanding of yeasts and their esters

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