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The Secret is Out!!

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Grain list:

 

Carapils: This dextrin malt increases foam, improves head retention, and enhances mouthfeel and body without adding flavor or color to your beer. Use 1-4 oz. Can be steeped, but more efficient if mashed.

 

2-row: Gives a smooth, mildly malty flavor. A basic malt for all beer and ale styles. Probably the most commonly used base malt in all-grain or partial-mash brewing. 2-Row is well modified, smooth, and high in enzymes. Used for adding flavor, ABV (up to .5%), and some color. Use 1-8 oz. Must be mashed.

 

Pilsner: This is a lightly kilned malt that contributes a crisp, clean maltiness to your homebrew. It adds very little color to the beer, making it a perfect candidate for enhancing lightly-colored beers such as lagers and pilsners. Must be mashed.

 

Caramel 15: Caramel malts (also known as "Crystal" malts) are produced in a roaster rather than a kiln. This allows for the application of higher temperatures to the green malt, resulting in the development of unique flavors, colors, and aromas.
Caramel 15 produces golden hues, and has a mellow, candy like sweetness and a mild toffee flavor. It will contribute more flavor than Carapils, but not as much as darker caramel malts. Use 1-4 oz for enhanced body and foam stability with a mild color and flavor contribution. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Caramel 40: Caramel malts (also known as "Crystal" malts) are produced in a roaster rather than a kiln. This allows for the application of higher temperatures to the green malt, resulting in the development of unique flavors, colors, and aromas.
Caramel 40 is a popular and versatile medium caramel malt that will contribute rich golden hues and smooth flavors of sweet toffee and caramel. Use 1-4 oz in many beer styles to enhance the body, foam stability, color, and flavor of your beer. Can be steeped or mashed

 

Caramel 60: Caramel malts (also known as "Crystal" malts) are produced in a roaster rather than a kiln. This allows for the application of higher temperatures to the green malt, resulting in the development of unique flavors, colors, and aromas.
Caramel 60 is a widely used and versatile medium crystal malt that will contribute a rich sweetness, pleasant toasted bread notes, and a pronounced, full caramel flavor with a light reddish hue. Use 1-4 oz in numerous beer styles for enhanced body and foam stability as well as additional flavor and color. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Victory: Victory® is a biscuit-style malt from Briess, lightly roasted to bring out the nutty, toasty, and biscuit flavors and aromas associated with baking bread. It’s an excellent malt for adding a layer of dry toasted complexity and a russet brown color to a wide range of beer styles. Use in small amounts to add a touch of warmth to light ales or lagers, or use in larger amounts in darker beers to bring out more of the toasted biscuit flavors. Use 2-6 oz. Must be mashed.

 

Black Malt: Has a sharper flavor than other roasted grains. A dark malt for use in porters and the occasional stout. Often used to provide color without the overpowering flavor that is characteristic of European-style dark beers. It will, however, produce a sharp astringency when used at higher rates. Use 1-4 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Roasted Barley: Roasted barley is made from unmalted barley, which makes it different from chocolate and black malts. It has the intense dry and bitter roasted coffee flavor characteristic of stouts. Can be used in any dark beer for added color and a roasty flavor. Use 1-6 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Chocolate Malt: Chocolate malt provides the dark flavors of roasted coffee and cocoa. Try it in browns, stouts, or porters for a hint of bittersweet chocolate and added color. Less roasty notes than Roasted Barley, but more chocolate notes. Use 1-6 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Vienna Malt: Vienna Malt is a kiln-dried barley malt darker than regular 2-row malt, but not as dark as Munich Malt. It imparts a golden to orange color and a distinctive toast or biscuit malt aroma to the beer. Intended for German Pilsner, Marzen, or Kolsch style beers, but also commonly used in in Mexican beers. Use 1-6 oz. Must be mashed.

 

Munich Malt: Munich-style malt that contributes a very robust, smooth malty sweetness. Great in alt, dunkel, bock, and other German styles, but is well suited to add extra maltiness and some added color to any beer. Use 1-8 oz. Must be mashed.

 

Honey Malt: Honey Malt is a unique malt produced by the Gambrinus Malting Corporation, a small malting company in Armstrong, British Columbia, Canada. It is made using a special process that develops distinctive flavors. The result is an intense malt sweetness free from roasted or astringent flavors, with a characteristic honey-like flavor and golden color. It really doesn’t compare to any other malt. It’s unique qualities and sweet maltiness make it a perfect specialty malt in many styles. The flavor can become assertive at higher usage rates. Use 1-4 oz. Must be mashed.

 

Flaked Oats: These are unmalted oats that have been de-husked, steamed, and then rolled between heated rollers to form flakes. The cooking and rolling process "gelatinizes" the starches, making them readily soluble and digestible by the enzymes in the mash. This allows the flakes to be added directly to the mash without any special treatment.
Oats add a distinctive full bodied grainy/oaty flavor, and silky smooth texture. Classic for rich and smooth oatmeal stouts, oats can be used in a wide variety of styles to add a little "something special". Use 1-4 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Flaked Rye: This is unmalted rye that has been de-husked, steamed, and then rolled between heated rollers to form flakes. The cooking and rolling process "gelatinizes" the starches, making them readily soluble and digestible by the enzymes in the mash. This allows the flakes to be added directly to the mash without any special treatment.
Flaked Rye gives a dry, crisp, strong rye flavor to most ales. Use 1-4 oz in light ales, 2-8 oz in darker ales. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Flaked Corn: Produced from yellow corn that has had the germ, oil and most of the protein removed, and then rolled between heated rollers to form flakes. The cooking and rolling process "gelatinizes" the starches, making them readily soluble and digestible by the enzymes in the mash. This allows the flakes to be added directly to the mash without any special treatment.
Flaked Corn lightens color and body, but maintains alcohol content. Use in small quantities to add depth of character and a slightly sweet creaminess to lighter ales and lagers. Very popular in cream ales. Use 1-4 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Flaked Rice: This is rice that has been steamed and then rolled between heated rollers to form flakes. The cooking and rolling process "gelatinizes" the starches, making them readily soluble and digestible by the enzymes in the mash. This allows the flakes to be added directly to the mash without any special treatment.
Flaked Rice lightens body, color, and flavor. Provides a light, dry and crisp finish. Used in light American ales and lagers. Use 1-4 oz. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

Flaked Wheat This is unmalted wheat that has been dehusked, steamed, and then rolled between heated rollers to form flakes. The cooking and rolling process "gelatinizes" the starches, making them readily soluble and digestible by the enzymes in the mash. This allows the flakes to be added directly to the mash without any special treatment.
Flaked Wheat greatly increases body and head retention in most any beer. Use in small quantities to prevent haze. Use 1-4 oz in ales, 2-6 oz in wheat beers. Can be steeped or mashed.

 

More grains to come...

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Partial Mash Recipe List:

 

Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout: Black as a Midlands night, Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout is a masterful blend of pale, caramel, chocolate and roast malts, along with a generous portion of malted oats. Moderately bitter yet creamy and satisfying, Sticky Wicket has the roasted flavor of an English stout and a dense, rich head from the oats for a truly unique experience.

 

Naughty Cream Ale: Feeling Naughty? Try our Naughty Cream Ale. This sexy brew exhibits a slightly sweet and malty flavor with a creamy body, and clean finish. The addition of flaked corn gives this beer a creamy head and mouthfeel that almost seems playfully naughty. So don’t be a prude – enjoy some Naughtiness in your life.

 

Let It Bee Honey Blonde: This golden straw colored beauty is a very sessionable beer with floral honey notes, and some sweetness to round out the subtle hop character. While this beer maybe light in body, it’s big on flavor.

 

Blackbeer’d Porter: Ahoy, me hearties! Put down that rotten grog and feast your lips on this dark concoction! This robust porter pays homage to one of the most notorious pirates in history, Edward Teach, aka “Blackbeard”. Just like the pirate, this porter is robust and complex. With hints of chocolate and notes of caramel and toffee, this malty brew will satisfy the most discerning swashbucklers and landlubbers alike. So drink up, mateys, and enjoy the best porter on the 7 seas!   

 

El Gordito Mexican Lager: This lager is a perfect example of the Vienna style lagers popular throughout Mexico, and now becoming more popular here in the US. Light and refreshing, this is the perfect beer to enjoy after a long day of work or during the hot summers. With its crisp, balanced flavor and clean finish, this beer is best enjoyed with a wedge of lime. 

 

Grass Cutter Lager: This very drinkable and thirst-quenching American lager is a great representation of the popular light-bodied, pale, fizzy lagers brewed by the larger macrobreweries, but better! It’s a well-balanced brew with a clean and crisp finish that will appeal to a large variety of beer drinkers. This is a great all-around beer for any occasion.

 

Santa Rita Pale Ale: The more complex sister to our Santa Catalina Pale Ale, this beer is bright and full of citrus notes from the Cascade hop addition. While this beer is hop-forward, it has minimal bitterness, which allows the malt backbone to carry the citrus flavors without overwhelming your palate. This is a great beer for any season.

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Oh my.  My pulse is racing and my hands are shaking.  (Pardon me while I wipe the drool off my keyboard.)  

 

Thanks for the heads-up!  Can't wait to start brewing some of these.

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2 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Video of Josh when the grains arrived:

 

 

Needs more enthusiasm

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The wait has been killing me! I literally check my email a few times a day and the surprise is finally here! :D

Great job guys!!

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Nice job keeping the secret @MRB Josh R!  I thought that you might break there awhile back.  ^_^

 

This is great news and I can't wait to learn how to brew using new methods.  Oh the recipes we will be able to make!!!

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Good idea. but the method needs to stay simple. That is the big benefit of past offerings. If offered pre mixed a bag like prior collaboration recipes it is not too much stretch from current process.

 

Next, we need to see the price for the convenience of buying recipe formulated bags of mixed grain or even I think from what I read above, probably 2 or 4 oz bags of each kind and maybe some bigger ones.

 

And will the recipe mixed bags only be available with the HME can or available separately for those that might have a can or 2 stashed away already?

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Grains will be available separately (in 4oz packages), and with the recipes. The grains are only about $0.50 extra. And the method is still VERY simple. How much more difficult is it to steep a bag of grains for 30 minutes? If you can make tea, you can make PM beer. If you can't handle that, you may want to find another hobby. lol.

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Also, all of our original kits and refills will still be available. No one is forcing anyone into partial mash. ;)

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Thanks! What I was thinking was that recipes would use  a mix of grains rather than one or a combination of the 4 oz packets only. so that for the special recipe stour you might get a mix of oats and chocolate malts not 4 oz of each.

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14 minutes ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one having a difficult time focusing on my day-job today... B)

 

Mine is the blessing and the curse of working at my home shop and in close and constant proximity to my brewing stuff. I haven't quite figured out what's more distracting...the stuff I've got in my working LBKs or the empty ones that I really, really want to fill. :rolleyes:

 

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49 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

Thanks! What I was thinking was that recipes would use  a mix of grains rather than one or a combination of the 4 oz packets only. so that for the special recipe stour you might get a mix of oats and chocolate malts not 4 oz of each.

 

At this time, you will get 4 oz of each even if it calls for 2 oz. So you will have 2 oz leftover. It's much easier for us to package and ship them this way. Besides, grains are so cheap, the extra 2 oz won't hurt your wallet.

 

Perhaps in the near future, we will package them in 2 and 4 oz packages. We may eventually move to this sooner than later. But for now, we'll just see how the 4oz packages do.

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Who knew that someday Josh would be shipping 4 oz baggies to people filled with all sorts of wonderful things?  Mom would be so proud!  

Capture2.JPG

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I'm totally pumped to try a PM recipe!  My world just got a whole lot bigger!! :)  Think there may be a new section in the forums dedicated to questions solely about grains?? :)

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28 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

Think there may be a new section in the forums dedicated to questions solely about grains?? :)

 The phrase "job security" does come to mind, especially if you happen to be @MRB Josh R!

 

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And before anyone asks, no, grains will NOT be available in bulk quantity. Sorry, all-grainers!

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One would imagine the PM recipes would be cheaper than normal recipes however, unless they're changing their HME sizes for those recipes I'd think they'll actually be more expensive? 

 

This is very exciting none the less

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4 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

At this time, you will get 4 oz of each even if it calls for 2 oz. So you will have 2 oz leftover. It's much easier for us to package and ship them this way. Besides, grains are so cheap, the extra 2 oz won't hurt your wallet.

 

Perhaps in the near future, we will package them in 2 and 4 oz packages. We may eventually move to this sooner than later. But for now, we'll just see how the 4oz packages do.

Makes sense.  It was what I expected but I had to ask - lol

Often it ends up that the packaging and handling and shipping cost so much more than the product so it is not worth shipping small sized packs too, it can be cheaper to give away product.

 

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that's awesum news! ive been using all grain cereal for my partial mashing and it taste better with milk!!

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13 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

One would imagine the PM recipes would be cheaper than normal recipes however, unless they're changing their HME sizes for those recipes I'd think they'll actually be more expensive? 

 

This is very exciting none the less

 

None of the HMEs are changing. Yes, the PM recipes will be more expensive, but only by about $1 at the most. Grains are very inexpensive, but the benefits are tremendous. Believe me, those few extra pennies will be worth it. 

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There is a process change involved.  I'm sure Josh will have great instructions, but in short you heat up some water to a specific temperature (160ish), put in the bag full of grain, and put a cover on the pot.  Come back in 30 minutes, remove the bag, and then hit the water to boiling, then follow the normal Mr. Beer process.  

 

It is truly as simple as steeping tea.

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Check out this blog for more information on using grains in Mr. Beer kits. I'm currently in the process of editing a short how-to video and it will be released as soon as it's done (probably sometime early next week). The Sir Kenneth Blonde, however, will be released either later today or sometime tomorrow.

 

http://blog.mrbeer.com/steeping-and-mashing-grains-101

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I would imagine that the new recipes would be similar to existing in that they would be a modification of  an HME base by adding a steep/mash of the crushed grains, then adding a HME, and could also include Booster, and LME/DME as well as various timed hop additions.

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Awesome!,I'm all in,been reading and studying all grains and partials as of late,cant wait guys this will be good I'm sure

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This is awesome! I think it is a great addition and can't wait to try it out. 

 

Thank you guys for expanding into this area. Very exciting!!!

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On February 12, 2016 at 0:04 PM, RickBeer said:

There is a process change involved.  I'm sure Josh will have great instructions, but in short you heat up some water to a specific temperature (160ish), put in the bag full of grain, and put a cover on the pot.  Come back in 30 minutes, remove the bag, and then hit the water to boiling, then follow the normal Mr. Beer process.  

 

It is truly as simple as steeping tea.

 

Noob curiousity here..."cover on the pot?"  @MRB Josh R instructions do not specify.  Thanks!

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After putting in the grain bag for a steep, the pot is covered to retain heat.  The burner is OFF.

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On February 11, 2016 at 3:34 PM, AnthonyC said:

Think there may be a new section in the forums dedicated to questions solely about grains?? :)

 

If there were, I could stop asking silly questions about steeping and mashing :)!  As a PM-newbie though,  I do feel that Step 3 of the Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale instructions could use a little more detail.  @MRB Josh Rs instructions do not mention covering the pot and removing from heat, only maintaining the temp. at 150-165 F for the 30 minute steep.  How is this achieved?  Does one apply heat as needed throughout the steep?  Is temperature control not as critical here since this is not a mash?  Isn't 2-Row base malt mash-only?  Should I take a break from the forum and go read some Palmer?  Later, then and TIA!

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Really looking forward to the release of the Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout and the Blackbeer'd Porter kits!  These both sound like great beers -- Maybe this week?

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My process to steep is, I warm pot to temp over regular burner add grain, get up to temp again, then put pot on the plate warmer on full blast. I don't cover but check temp with food thermometer to see if temp is still OK.

 

So since we are talking steeping should this be called "Partial Steep" not a "Partial Mash"?

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14 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

If there were, I could stop asking silly questions about steeping and mashing :)!  As a PM-newbie though,  I do feel that Step 3 of the Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale instructions could use a little more detail.  @MRB Josh Rs instructions do not mention covering the pot and removing from heat, only maintaining the temp. at 150-165 F for the 30 minute steep.  How is this achieved?  Does one apply heat as needed throughout the steep?  Is temperature control not as critical here since this is not a mash?  Isn't 2-Row base malt mash-only?  Should I take a break from the forum and go read some Palmer?  Later, then and TIA!

 

You don't HAVE to cover the pot, but if it helps you keep your temperatures, then it won't hurt. The key is to keep within a temperature range for 30 minutes. That's it. It doesn't need to be anymore complicated than that. Keeping temperatures at 150-165 is NOT "steeping", it is "mashing".

 

Please read: http://blog.mrbeer.com/steeping-and-mashing-grains-101

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For the sake of simplicity, all of our PM recipes will be mashed and the technique will be referred to as "mashing", even if the grains can simply be steeped. While many grains do not need mashing, they will still be more efficient at mashing temperatures. Remember, the only difference between steeping and mashing techniques is the temperature. For every recipe, it will be 155-165 for 30 minutes.

 

Also, back to the cover on the pot question: I've found that when using aluminum pots, it's more difficult to maintain temps because they act as a heat sink. In this case, a lid really helps. Just be sure you're keeping an eye on the temp.

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And the light comes on:wacko:!  For some reason, I had it in my head that this first PM recipe included a steep, maybe because it uses Carapils and you hardly ever see that word on the forum not used along with 'steep'.  I've got this!  Thanks for the help guys!

 

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3 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Well, technically, mashing IS steeping...lol.

 

But steeping is NOT mashing... :rolleyes:  Thanks again for the help -- for a while there I felt like the "Wanna get away?" guy on the SW Airlines commercials, but I am doing better now! 

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On February 11, 2016 at 9:33 AM, MRB Josh R said:

Partial Mash Recipe List:

 

Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout: Black as a Midlands night, Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout is a masterful blend of pale, caramel, chocolate and roast malts, along with a generous portion of malted oats. Moderately bitter yet creamy and satisfying, Sticky Wicket has the roasted flavor of an English stout and a dense, rich head from the oats for a truly unique experience.

 

Naughty Cream Ale: Feeling Naughty? Try our Naughty Cream Ale. This sexy brew exhibits a slightly sweet and malty flavor with a creamy body, and clean finish. The addition of flaked corn gives this beer a creamy head and mouthfeel that almost seems playfully naughty. So don’t be a prude – enjoy some Naughtiness in your life.

 

Let It Bee Honey Blonde: This golden straw colored beauty is a very sessionable beer with floral honey notes, and some sweetness to round out the subtle hop character. While this beer maybe light in body, it’s big on flavor.

 

Blackbeer’d Porter: Ahoy, me hearties! Put down that rotten grog and feast your lips on this dark concoction! This robust porter pays homage to one of the most notorious pirates in history, Edward Teach, aka “Blackbeard”. Just like the pirate, this porter is robust and complex. With hints of chocolate and notes of caramel and toffee, this malty brew will satisfy the most discerning swashbucklers and landlubbers alike. So drink up, mateys, and enjoy the best porter on the 7 seas!   

 

El Gordito Mexican Lager: This lager is a perfect example of the Vienna style lagers popular throughout Mexico, and now becoming more popular here in the US. Light and refreshing, this is the perfect beer to enjoy after a long day of work or during the hot summers. With its crisp, balanced flavor and clean finish, this beer is best enjoyed with a wedge of lime. 

 

Grass Cutter Lager: This very drinkable and thirst-quenching American lager is a great representation of the popular light-bodied, pale, fizzy lagers brewed by the larger macrobreweries, but better! It’s a well-balanced brew with a clean and crisp finish that will appeal to a large variety of beer drinkers. This is a great all-around beer for any occasion.

 

Santa Rita Pale Ale: The more complex sister to our Santa Catalina Pale Ale, this beer is bright and full of citrus notes from the Cascade hop addition. While this beer is hop-forward, it has minimal bitterness, which allows the malt backbone to carry the citrus flavors without overwhelming your palate. This is a great beer for any season.

 

"Do you have anything in a Doppelbock?"  I asked that of our waiter last Saturday night and received a blank and confused stare.  Seriously though, I can't wait to see what PM recipes Mr. Beer will be rolling out in the coming days!  Still giddy about grains and it's been over a week!

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12 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

"Do you have anything in a Doppelbock?"  I asked that of our waiter last Saturday night and received a blank and confused stare.  Seriously though, I can't wait to see what PM recipes Mr. Beer will be rolling out in the coming days!  Still giddy about grains and it's been over a week!

 

We're working on it. We will be adding more recipes (both extract and PM) throughout the spring/summer season. Now that things have slowed down a bit from the holiday rush, we can start moving forward with some of the new products and recipes we will be releasing. I just added a PM doppelbock to my list. ;)

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The Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout recipe calls for 2-row malt, but the picture shows Crystal Malt 60.  I added the recipe to my cart to see which malts actually ship and it looks like 2-row, along with the chocolate and oatmeal grains.  Thanks for any clarification!

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Yes, it comes with 2-row. There was a mistake in the recipe and it should have had 2-row instead of C60. If anyone bought that recipe before the change was made and you received C60 instead of the 2-row, let me know ASAP.

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