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JoshR

New Recipe - Sir Kenneth American Blonde Ale!!

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Email-SirKenneth-Collab_01-1.jpg?t=14552

 

Our newest Brewery Collaboration beer is now available!! It is also our very first Partial Mash Recipe!!!

 

Proceeds from all Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale recipes sold will be donated directly to Paladin Brewery's owner and Brewmaster, John Chandler.

 

John started with a Mr. Beer kit several years ago, and recently decided to open his own brewery. However, he was diagnosed with sinus cancer right before the brewery's opening. Now, Paladin is celebrating their 6-month anniversary, and most importantly, John's health, as he is in remission.

 

This Mr.Beer clone of Paladin's Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale is an American Blonde Ale using hops commonly found in a Bohemian Pilsner. This beer is crisp and clean with a nice, rich malt and spicy hop character.

 

Get yours here for only $29.99: http://www.mrbeer.com/sir-kenneth-blonde-ale-collaboration

 

Email-SirKenneth-Collab_04.jpg?t=1455208

 

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Ordered it last night.    Can't wait to start it.

 

Thanks!

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Editor - Instruction # 11    "both LME softpacks"    I only see one?

Looks a good one.

 

Update:

I did order one - although I got a "Gateway error - transaction declined" . SO I cleared the cart and succeeded 2nd time.

 

Maybe I should add another Smooth pack to fulfill the instructions - lol?

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

Editor - Instruction # 11    "both LME softpacks"    I only see one?

Looks a good one.

 

Update:

I did order one - although I got a "Gateway error - transaction declined" . SO I cleared the cart and succeeded 2nd time.

 

Maybe I should add another Smooth pack to fulfill the instructions - lol?

 

 

 

 

It only uses 1 LME. The instructions have a typo. I will make sure it gets fixed by Monday. Thanks for the catch!

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21 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Email-SirKenneth-Collab_01-1.jpg?t=14552

 

Our newest Brewery Collaboration beer is now available!! It is also our very first Partial Mash Recipe!!!

 

Proceeds from all Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale recipes sold will be donated directly to Paladin Brewery's owner and Brewmaster, John Chandler.

 

John started with a Mr. Beer kit several years ago, and recently decided to open his own brewery. However, he was diagnosed with sinus cancer right before the brewery's opening. Now, Paladin is celebrating their 6-month anniversary, and most importantly, John's health, as he is in remission.

 

This Mr.Beer clone of Paladin's Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale is an American Blonde Ale using hops commonly found in a Bohemian Pilsner. This beer is crisp and clean with a nice, rich malt and spicy hop character.

 

Get yours here for only $29.99: http://www.mrbeer.com/sir-kenneth-blonde-ale-collaboration

 

Email-SirKenneth-Collab_04.jpg?t=1455208

 

Any chance this or any of the other advanced recipes end up on Amazon Prime?

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I'm sure Josh will answer on Monday, but the likelihood is no.  Crushed grains need to be crushed and shipped, not stored for long periods.  Amazon storage wouldn't work well for these products.

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Reading the instructions says to step the grains, strain, then boil 0.5oz Sterling hops for 10 minutes. I'm just wondering if there are enough sugars with 8oz grains, in five cups water, for the hop acids to attach to. I know the first hop addition is for flavor, I'm just curious what the utilization factor is with the small grain steep/mash. 

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Using QBrew one can easily see this. 0.25lbs of Carapils and 0.25lbs of 2-row, steeped in 1/4 gallon is a gravity of 1.035, which should be fine.

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On February 13, 2016 at 10:59 AM, MRB Josh R said:

 

It only uses 1 LME. The instructions have a typo. I will make sure it gets fixed by Monday. Thanks for the catch!

 

While you are in edit mode, I think Step 7 may need a little clarification so as not to confuse first-time PMers like me.  There would be no need to remove the pot from heat following the 10 minute Sterling boil, as we go directly into the first Saaz addition at that time. Yes?

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3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Using QBrew one can easily see this. 0.25lbs of Carapils and 0.25lbs of 2-row, steeped in 1/4 gallon is a gravity of 1.035, which should be fine.

 

I'm working today and am on my mobile device. Haven't found a brewing calculator that's worth a darn for Android devices. 

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On 2/13/2016 at 8:01 AM, Nickfixit said:

Editor - Instruction # 11    "both LME softpacks"    I only see one?

Looks a good one.

 

Update:

I did order one - although I got a "Gateway error - transaction declined" . SO I cleared the cart and succeeded 2nd time.

 

Maybe I should add another Smooth pack to fulfill the instructions - lol?

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the catch @Nickfixit!

Fixed.

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On 2/13/2016 at 0:07 PM, dsmizzle said:

Any chance this or any of the other advanced recipes end up on Amazon Prime?

 

No. The recipes and grains are only available through us.

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19 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

While you are in edit mode, I think Step 7 may need a little clarification so as not to confuse first-time PMers like me.  There would be no need to remove the pot from heat following the 10 minute Sterling boil, as we go directly into the first Saaz addition at that time. Yes?

 

Thanks @Bonsai & Brew!

 

Fixed.

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On 2/14/2016 at 9:38 AM, sabres032 said:

Reading the instructions says to step the grains, strain, then boil 0.5oz Sterling hops for 10 minutes. I'm just wondering if there are enough sugars with 8oz grains, in five cups water, for the hop acids to attach to. I know the first hop addition is for flavor, I'm just curious what the utilization factor is with the small grain steep/mash. 

 

Hop oils bond to carbohydrates, starches, and dextrins. If you wish, you can add the LME before your hop boil, but it won't make much of a noticeable difference in hop utilization, especially since this isn't a hop-forward beer. The reason I recommend adding the LME later rather than for the hop boil is to prevent darkening of the malt. This is a blonde ale so I'm trying to keep it within the style.

 

On 2/14/2016 at 0:28 PM, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

While you are in edit mode, I think Step 7 may need a little clarification so as not to confuse first-time PMers like me.  There would be no need to remove the pot from heat following the 10 minute Sterling boil, as we go directly into the first Saaz addition at that time. Yes?

 

That is correct. This has been fixed.

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I see there is a review already for the beer, comparing it favorably to the original. How does one get on your preview taste testing team?

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1 hour ago, Nickfixit said:

I see there is a review already for the beer, comparing it favorably to the original. How does one get on your preview taste testing team?

I'd like to know, too!  Maybe I have to fly up to Ohio (from Texas) and try the original brew to get onto the premier preview taste testing team.

 

I ordered mine on the first day and it just shipped today.....Can't wait to get it started.

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I'm definitely ordering this tomorrow. I can brew this along with the Baltic Porter and keep both LBKs full. Now I need to work on the orange wheat recipe. 

 

Edit: Hopefully my order arrives by Saturday... :thumbup

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Received my Sir Kenneth package today!  The package had the revised set of instructions in it.  Thanks!

Everything went well in the kitchen.  I was meticulous about sanitizing everything.  One thing I noticed was that the grains really absorb a lot of the liquid.  It was a little tricky lifting the grain pack out at the end of the steep, draining it, and then slipping a colander under it and pouring the cup of hot water over it.  But it worked.  The Sterling hops sack also absorbed some liquid.  Then, the first Saaz sack also absorbed some liquids.  Dropped the third hops sack in at the end of the simmer and then added the extract can and the LME.

 

The color of the wort looked good in the LBK.  My OG was a bit lower than the instructions suggested.  But maybe it's my hydrometer.  I always seem to get a number lower than the instructions suggest.   I had an OG of 1.037.  I pitched the Safale US-5 yeast and closed everything up.

 

Now, the hard part for me is waiting.  It sure helps to have other brews already finished that I can enjoy.

 

This partial mash recipe is the perfect next step from the other Mr. Beer extract recipes.  The process took me about 2 hours from start to clean-up finish.  I don't know if I could handle an all-day full blown brew from basic grains and hops.  I have a great wife but I don't know if she could handle an all-day brew in her kitchen, either!

 

OK.  I'll figure 3 weeks in the LBK.  Then 2 months conditioning?  That would put it around Cinco de Mayo (May 5th) here in Texas.  Should be great!

 

 

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On 2/16/2016 at 7:11 PM, Nickfixit said:

I see there is a review already for the beer, comparing it favorably to the original. How does one get on your preview taste testing team?

 

This was most likely from a patron of the brewery party during the release at Paladin Brewery.

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Free shipping gets me yet again!  Looking forward to (finally) getting started with partial mash brewing and the Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale!

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I should add, congratulations on the successful launch of the first partial mash recipe!  We will be wanting more!

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Awe man,,,,,,,,,,was just getting on now to order it,,,,,feel like ive been kicked in my hop sack,,,,ha!!!! Now i have to order somethig else to take advantage of the free shipping .._,,,,,:o

:)

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On ‎2‎/‎20‎/‎2016 at 8:18 AM, Stroomer420 said:

Awe man,,,,,,,,,,was just getting on now to order it,,,,,feel like ive been kicked in my hop sack,,,,ha!!!! Now i have to order somethig else to take advantage of the free shipping .._,,,,,:o

:)

 

Yep, but you can still make something very close based on the published recipe description and instructions.

I bet you could also donate if you wanted to.

Info here http://www.mrbeer.com/sir-kenneth-blonde-ale-collaboration  for instructions.

You could get all ingredients except grains from Mr B. AND get free shipping now

  • 1 Canadian Blonde Brewing Extract(Yeast under lid. You won’t be using this.)
  • 1 Brewmax LME Softpak– Smooth
  •  - get someplace else or wait until available - 1 Packet Carapils Grains (4 oz.
  •   - get someplace else or wait until available - 1 Packet 2-Row Brewers Malt (4 oz.)
  • 1 Packet Sterling Hops (0.5 oz)
  • 2 Packets Saaz Hops (0.5 oz each)
  • 4 Muslin Sacks
  • 1 Safale US-05 Yeast
  • 1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser
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Would an original gravity of 1.062 be close for this recipe? That's what I read before I pitched the yeast with wort temp at 60 degrees. 

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You could work backwards from expected ABV and see. But that looks a bit high - just off the cuff.

The Can Blonde gives  3 to 3.5 % ABV, the Softpack another 1%,  8 oz grains -->  between 4 to 6 oz of extract ~ 0.5 to .75% totaling  4.5 to 5.25% range.

Brewers friend calculator gives 6.8%  if you ferment out 1.062 to 1.01.

SO working backwards using 4.5 to 5.25  ABV, I would think OG range 1.045 to 1.050 unless you put extra malt in it :-).

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I brewed this today at a brewing event at Bust Head Brewing, Vint Hill, VA today.
It was Big Boots Brew Day.
Big Boots Brew Day was born from the Pink Boots Society members’ amazing participation in International Women’s Collaboration Brew Day to raise the profile of women in the industry and to raise the profile of beer to women. On Big Boots Brew Day, Pink Boots chapters, members, breweries, and supporters all get together, don their pink boots, and get brewing!
I did get pinked, and I wore my "Flash" shirt - well, it is mostly pink....

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5 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

You could work backwards from expected ABV and see. But that looks a bit high - just off the cuff.

The Can Blonde gives  3 to 3.5 % ABV, the Softpack another 1%,  8 oz grains -->  between 4 to 6 oz of extract ~ 0.5 to .75% totaling  4.5 to 5.25% range.

Brewers friend calculator gives 6.8%  if you ferment out 1.062 to 1.01.

SO working backwards using 4.5 to 5.25  ABV, I would think OG range 1.045 to 1.050 unless you put extra malt in it :-).

 

Brewed exactly as the instructions said with the only difference I chilled the wort to 70 before I added to the gallon of cold water in the LBK. Took an OG reading before I pitched the yeast and it read 1.062 at 60 degrees. I did add about half a cup of boiled water to the HME can and LME soft pack to get every ounce of fermentables out. Once all the wort was added I only had to top of with a bit of water to reach the 8.5 liter mark. 

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Hmm. I am not confident on OGs as measuring my last Dunkelweisen I got 1.035 after steeping 1..5 lbs of grain and using a Wheat HME can. Maybe I got nothing from the grains? but seemed strange. I soaked it for 50 min at 160.

According (again) to Brewer's Friend temp difference of 10 deg will only make an error of .001 so no big deal.

http://www.brewersfriend.com/hydrometer-temp/

 

 

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OK I goofed up on my numbers. My Baltic Porter came in at 1.062 at 60 degrees, my Sir Kenneth Blonde came in at 1.052 at 60 degrees.. 

 

I swear next batch I'll minimize the distractions before posting final results. 

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3 minutes ago, sabres032 said:

OK I goofed up on my numbers. My Baltic Porter came in at 1.062 at 60 degrees, my Sir Kenneth Blonde came in at 1.052 at 60 degrees.. 

 

I swear next batch I'll minimize the distractions before posting final results. 

 

LOL. I don't have that excuse with mine - see last post edited.

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5 minutes ago, sabres032 said:

OK I goofed up on my numbers. My Baltic Porter came in at 1.062 at 60 degrees, my Sir Kenneth Blonde came in at 1.052 at 60 degrees.. 

 

Interesting  - so estimated calculations are close.

Mr B says 3.5% for standard can  and 1% for softpack and a 75% utilization for grains (then using DME equivalent of 1% per 8 oz) gives the 1.052.

Nice. That is what I usually do with recipes, and don't usually bother with hydrometer  - not very scientific I am afraid.

For the DunkelWeisen I will have to see what it tastes like when done then I will know if I did badly on the grains. I will say that the initial 3 days of fermentation it was smelling VERY estery. I used about 4 gm yeast (1/3 Fermentis packet).

 

Oh on yeast amounts, I see Coopers uses a 7 gm packet of yeast for their 6 gal brew.

Compare Mr B at 5 gm for 2.2 gal and Fermentis pkts at 11.5g.

So I guess the Coopers beers are going to taste more estery from lower pitching rate.

Whereas a complete Fermentis pack in MR B 2.2 gal would taste much cleaner.

Hmm.

 

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Brewing was meticulous and I kept decent notes. After the yeast was pitched my cousin, his girlfriend, my wife and I started to socialize (ie drink and gab about nothing in particular) that's where I goofed on asking my OG readings. I was thinking Sir Kenneth but looked at the Baltic Porter notes and thought, wow that's high. Disregard my previous babbling, it's all good now. 

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Good, we should have beer close to same time .  I'll be interested in your thoughts on it. Should be crisp, it had 1.5 oz added hops.

If I works well I may be doing that to more of them.

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There's a local micro brewery near me and I've been taking with the owner-operator about partial mash and all grain brewing. He told me the way he measures utilization of his grains is he eats them. Once after grinding to taste the profile and sweatiness and then after mashing and sprging. He says if the sweetness is gone he has good utilization, if not he sparges with more hot water. I ate some of the grains after the steep and rinse and I'll be damned,  there wasn't much sweetness left. Kind of tasted like porridge or plain old grits.  

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12 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

Good, we should have beer close to same time .  I'll be interested in your thoughts on it. Should be crisp, it had 1.5 oz added hops.

If I works well I may be doing that to more of them.

 

I tried a shot glass sample before I pitched the yeast and it tasted OK. Kind of sweet and malty but that's to be expected from fresh wort. Can't wait to see what the finished product tastes like. 

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didn't know there were two josh's? are the two josh's related? you wouldn't be joshing me would u?

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Question about fermenting time for Sir Kenneth.  I'll be at 21 days tomorrow.  But I saw a few bubbles still on top of the liquid in the LBK.  The bubbles look "fresh"...not just residual floaters on top.   I followed the recipe exactly.  Temperature has been steady between 68 deg F and 70 deg F.  Just looking through the LBK, the color looks great.

Should I take a hydrometer reading tomorrow and the next day and see if it's "done"...or just stick with the 3 weeks fermenting time and bottle tomorrow night no matter what?  The partial mash is a step up for me from the extract recipes so I'm not sure what the best process is for this one.  Thanks!

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1 hour ago, K5WX said:

Question about fermenting time for Sir Kenneth.  I'll be at 21 days tomorrow.  But I saw a few bubbles still on top of the liquid in the LBK.  The bubbles look "fresh"...not just residual floaters on top.   I followed the recipe exactly.  Temperature has been steady between 68 deg F and 70 deg F.  Just looking through the LBK, the color looks great.

Should I take a hydrometer reading tomorrow and the next day and see if it's "done"...or just stick with the 3 weeks fermenting time and bottle tomorrow night no matter what?  The partial mash is a step up for me from the extract recipes so I'm not sure what the best process is for this one.  Thanks!

 

Bubbles mean nothing. Co2 can off-gas for several days after the fermentation has concluded. If you are judging whether your beer is done by how much it's bubbling, you can be waiting for weeks. If 21 days have passed and you fermented at the proper temps, your beer is done (it only take 7-14 days to ferment all of the sugar).

 

All beer will ferment for the same time regardless of how it was made. After the initial grain mash/steep, nothing else is different from any other refill or recipe.

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Bubbles mean nothing. Co2 can off-gas for several days after the fermentation has concluded. If you are judging whether your beer is done by how much it's bubbling, you can be waiting for weeks. If 21 days have passed and you fermented at the proper temps, your beer is done (it only take 7-14 days to ferment all of the sugar).

 

All beer will ferment for the same time regardless of how it was made. After the initial grain mash/steep, nothing else is different from any other refill or recipe.

That's what I needed to learn.  Thanks!

 

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Tested final gravity of my Sir Kenneth Blonde today and hit 1.014, my original gravity hit 1.054. According to Screwy Brewer that makes 5.2% abv???? Target according to the website is 4.6%. I know my readings were corrected to 60 degrees according to my hydrometer. 

 

Anyway it has a nice straw color with a slight haze, nice futility aroma with a very clean almost lemony flavor. Over all a great recipe that I plan on brewing again.

 

Due to work schedule, I cold crash on Saturday and bottle on Tuesday

 

Pics below. 

 

 

IMAG0062.jpg

IMAG0063.jpg

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@sabres032 I'll have to admit, that's a pretty good looking beer! It's up there on my list of beers to brew next. 

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Just now, Big Sarge said:

@sabres032 I'll have to admit, that's a pretty good looking beer! It's up there on my list of beers to brew next. 

 

Dooeeeet!!!! Final review when it's conditioned and ready to drink but so far this is a great recipe. Well done Mr. Beer, well done indeed. 

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16 minutes ago, sabres032 said:

 

Dooeeeet!!!! Final review when it's conditioned and ready to drink but so far this is a great recipe. Well done Mr. Beer, well done indeed. 

 

Thanks! This was our Paladin Brewery collaboration. According to the Paladin Brewmaster, and the folks here at MRB, it was pretty spot-on. I'm quite proud of that one. :)

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Also, keep in mind, that 100% of the proceeds from that beer go to the owner/Brewmaster of Paladin Brewing, John Chandler, who just defeated cancer. The proceeds help pay his medical bills. That ought to make you feel even better about brewing that beer, which was named in honor of John's grandfather, Ken Erdner, a veteran, and "a man who lives by the standards of chivalry exemplified by the knights of ole". :D

 

http://paladinbrewing.com/paladin-brewing-beer-flavors.html

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36 minutes ago, sabres032 said:

 

Dooeeeet!!!! Final review when it's conditioned and ready to drink but so far this is a great recipe. Well done Mr. Beer, well done indeed. 

Trust me, the desire to do so is high. I'm on a strict brewing allotment right now (SWMBO) and have been trying to maximize the brew supplies purchased. 

On a side note: I am still waiting on the release for the Naughty Cream Ale @MRB Josh R. I know it's probably the Notty shortage but I'd love to piece it together through you guys while local purchasing the yeast. 

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47 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Thanks! This was our Paladin Brewery collaboration. According to the Paladin Brewmaster, and the folks here at MRB, it was pretty spot-on. I'm quite proud of that one. :)

 

I bottle Tuesday and I figure 4-5 weeks conditioning and I can give a final review. From what I see so far this is an excellent recipe. My honest opinion, don't let this one expire. 

 

 

27 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

Also, keep in mind, that 100% of the proceeds from that beer go to the owner/Brewmaster of Paladin Brewing, John Chandler, who just defeated cancer. The proceeds help pay his medical bills. That ought to make you feel even better about brewing that beer, which was named in honor of John's grandfather, Ken Erdner, a veteran, and "a man who lives by the standards of chivalry exemplified by the knights of ole". :D

 

http://paladinbrewing.com/paladin-brewing-beer-flavors.html

 

What more can anyone expect? Brew an excellent beer and support a fellow brewmaster who beat cancer.  I'm going to order two more in the next day or two. 

 

Cheers @JohnChandler keep up the good fight, brother. #f***cancer

 

25 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Trust me, the desire to do so is high. I'm on a strict brewing allotment right now (SWMBO) and have been trying to maximize the brew supplies purchased. 

On a side note: I am still waiting on the release for the Naughty Cream Ale @MRB Josh R. I know it's probably the Notty shortage but I'd love to piece it together through you guys while local purchasing the yeast. 

 

Sometimes SWMBO has no say when it comes to brewing beer. My wife is just beginning to understand this. 

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22 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Trust me, the desire to do so is high. I'm on a strict brewing allotment right now (SWMBO) and have been trying to maximize the brew supplies purchased. 

On a side note: I am still waiting on the release for the Naughty Cream Ale @MRB Josh R. I know it's probably the Notty shortage but I'd love to piece it together through you guys while local purchasing the yeast. 

 

I'll post the recipe tomorrow. Just clocked off and heading to the Tucson Hop Shop for a beer. :)

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4 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

I'll post the recipe tomorrow. Just clocked off and heading to the Tucson Hop Shop for a beer. :)

I figured it was close to quitting time, but thanks much! I think I'll just have to go against the grain and order both @sabres032! She knows she created this monster when she bought me a Mr. Beer kit two Christmas' ago B)

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14 hours ago, sabres032 said:

 

IMAG0063.jpg

 

Great color, I will bottle mine in a day or 2.

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On ‎3‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 9:27 AM, Nickfixit said:

 

Great color, I will bottle mine in a day or 2.

 

Bottled it today. It tastes really good. I want it to be mature quickly but .... I will have to wait I suppose.

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11 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

 

Bottled it today. It tastes really good. I want it to be mature quickly but .... I will have to wait I suppose.

 

I might bottle tonight after work depending how I feel. If not tonight tomorrow morning. 

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@Big Sarge, sorry I was out sick on Friday. Here's that recipe:

 

 

Naughty Cream Ale

 

1 Classic American Light (Yeast under lid. You won’t be using this.)

 

1 Brewmax LME - Pale
4 oz Flaked Corn

 

2 oz Pilsner Malt

 

2 oz Carapils

 

1 Packet Hallertau Hops (1/2 oz)

 

1 Muslin Hop Sack (Small)

 

1 Muslin Grain Sack (Large)

 

1 Nottingham Yeast

 

1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser

 

 

 

OG: 1.047 (approx.) -- FG: 1.012 (approx.)

 

Suggested conditioning time is 6 to 8 weeks.

 

Flavor: Balanced

 

ABV (alc/vol): 4.5%

 

SRM (Color): 2

 

IBU (Bitterness): 17

 

 

Brewing:

 

1.       Using a measuring cup, pour 4 cups of water into your clean 3-quart or larger pot.

 

2.       Add the grains to the Muslin Grain Sack and bring your water up to above 155 degrees F.

 

3.       Add the grain sack to the hot water and steep for 30 minutes between 155-165 degrees.

 

4.       Carefully lift the grain sack out of the pot and place into a strainer/colander. Rinse the sack over the pot with 1 cup of hot water. Let drain. Do NOT squeeze the grain bag. Discard grain bag.

 

5.       Remove the yeast packet from under the lid of the Brewing Extract (you won’t be using this), then place the unopened can in hot tap water.

 

6.       Place the pellet hops into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material.

 

7.       Bring grain water to a low rolling boil, add in hop sack, and let boil for 5 minutes, then remove from heat.

 

8.       Open the can of Brewing Extract and LME Softpack, pour the contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called “wort”.

 

9.       Fill keg with cold tap water to the #1 mark on the back.

 

10.   Pour the wort, including the hop sack, into the keg, and then bring the volume of the keg to the #2 mark by adding more cold water. You'll leave the hop sack in the wort for the duration of fermentation. Stir vigorously with the spoon or whisk.

 

11.   Sprinkle the Nottingham yeast packet into the keg, and screw on the lid. Do not stir.

 

12.   Put your keg in a location with a consistent temperature between 65° and 76° F (20°-25° C) and out of direct sunlight. Ferment for 14 days.

 

13.   After approximately 24 hours, you will be able to see the fermentation process happening by shining a flashlight into the keg. You'll see the yeast in action in the wort. The liquid will be opaque and milky, you will see bubbles rising in the liquid, and there will be bubbles on the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Looks pretty good @MRB Josh R! Thanks for sharing it and don't worry, I had faith in you. :)

I hope you're feeling better!

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12 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

@Big Sarge, sorry I was out sick on Friday. Here's that recipe:

 

 

Naughty Cream Ale

 

1 Classic American Light (Yeast under lid. You won’t be using this.)

 

1 Brewmax LME - Pale
4 oz Flaked Corn

 

2 oz Pilsner Malt

 

2 oz Carapils

 

1 Packet Hallertau Hops (1/2 oz)

 

1 Muslin Hop Sack (Small)

 

1 Muslin Grain Sack (Large)

 

1 Nottingham Yeast

 

1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser

 

 

 

OG: 1.047 (approx.) -- FG: 1.012 (approx.)

 

Suggested conditioning time is 6 to 8 weeks.

 

Flavor: Balanced

 

ABV (alc/vol): 4.5%

 

SRM (Color): 2

 

IBU (Bitterness): 17

 

 

Brewing:

 

1.       Using a measuring cup, pour 4 cups of water into your clean 3-quart or larger pot.

 

2.       Add the grains to the Muslin Grain Sack and bring your water up to above 155 degrees F.

 

3.       Add the grain sack to the hot water and steep for 30 minutes between 155-165 degrees.

 

4.       Carefully lift the grain sack out of the pot and place into a strainer/colander. Rinse the sack over the pot with 1 cup of hot water. Let drain. Do NOT squeeze the grain bag. Discard grain bag.

 

5.       Remove the yeast packet from under the lid of the Brewing Extract (you won’t be using this), then place the unopened can in hot tap water.

 

6.       Place the pellet hops into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material.

 

7.       Bring grain water to a low rolling boil, add in hop sack, and let boil for 5 minutes, then remove from heat.

 

8.       Open the can of Brewing Extract and LME Softpack, pour the contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called “wort”.

 

9.       Fill keg with cold tap water to the #1 mark on the back.

 

10.   Pour the wort, including the hop sack, into the keg, and then bring the volume of the keg to the #2 mark by adding more cold water. You'll leave the hop sack in the wort for the duration of fermentation. Stir vigorously with the spoon or whisk.

 

11.   Sprinkle the Nottingham yeast packet into the keg, and screw on the lid. Do not stir.

 

12.   Put your keg in a location with a consistent temperature between 65° and 76° F (20°-25° C) and out of direct sunlight. Ferment for 14 days.

 

13.   After approximately 24 hours, you will be able to see the fermentation process happening by shining a flashlight into the keg. You'll see the yeast in action in the wort. The liquid will be opaque and milky, you will see bubbles rising in the liquid, and there will be bubbles on the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A good as that looks I still have nightmares getting sick drinking Genny Cream Ale. One bottle and I was puking the entire night. After 25 years my gut still knots up seeing or hearing there words cream ale. 

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Genny Cream was replaced years ago by GoLytety. For those that don't know GoLytety, it is what you drink before a colonoscopy to cleanse.  Many a college evening spent with Genny Cream only to cleanse the next day...

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On 3/29/2016 at 5:15 AM, RickBeer said:

Genny Cream was replaced years ago by GoLytety. For those that don't know GoLytety, it is what you drink before a colonoscopy to cleanse.  Many a college evening spent with Genny Cream only to cleanse the next day...

 

Genesee brewery still makes the Cream Ale. Personally I think GoLYTELY of a spin off company of Genesee Brewery established after reports of the "colon cleanse" effect of the cream ale. 

 

Another interesting fact. Genesee Brewery now produces, bottles and ships Labatt and Labatt Lite right here in Rochester, NY. 

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On March 24, 2016 at 6:44 PM, MRB Josh R said:

Also, keep in mind, that 100% of the proceeds from that beer go to the owner/Brewmaster of Paladin Brewing, John Chandler, who just defeated cancer. 

 

Josh, I see that the Sir Kenneth PM recipe is sold out due to what looks like a Carapils inventory shortage. I assume the charity proceeds won't go through unless it is ordered as a recipe? I don't want to piece it together if that is the case, unless there is a way to still order it minus the Carapils (with proceeds, of course). 

Just wondering :)

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14 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

 

Josh, I see that the Sir Kenneth PM recipe is sold out due to what looks like a Carapils inventory shortage. I assume the charity proceeds won't go through unless it is ordered as a recipe? I don't want to piece it together if that is the case, unless there is a way to still order it minus the Carapils (with proceeds, of course). 

Just wondering :)

 

I was wondering about this myself. I want to order a couple more kits and help support a fellow brewer. 

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Carapils will be in tomorrow and the kit should be available next week (we need to mill and package the grains). And this is true that the recipe must be bought whole for the proceeds to be forwarded.

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2 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Carapils will be in tomorrow and the kit should be available next week (we need to mill and package the grains). And this is true that the recipe must be bought whole for the proceeds to be forwarded.

Do you guys get slammed when a recipe goes out of commission due to one ingredient being unavailable? I know it would require a more robust ordering system, but it would be nice to still order a recipe, minus what's missing. I'm sure most of us could supplement with LHBS purchases. It's not a big deal, just my thoughts for the day. :P

This is obviously a moot point with the Sir Kenneth, as the proceeds go to an excellent cause!

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Really guys, the Cream Ale has CAL in it, how bad can it be?

For CAL virgins, try Dad's Cream Ale recipe first - lol.  No sense on overdoing it.

 

(Spoiler alert - I actually like the DCA.)

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On 3/29/2016 at 2:54 PM, Big Sarge said:

Do you guys get slammed when a recipe goes out of commission due to one ingredient being unavailable? I know it would require a more robust ordering system, but it would be nice to still order a recipe, minus what's missing. I'm sure most of us could supplement with LHBS purchases. It's not a big deal, just my thoughts for the day. :P

This is obviously a moot point with the Sir Kenneth, as the proceeds go to an excellent cause!

...and have the price of the missing item be subtracted from the recipe instead of being charged for piecing it together.  Please!  

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15 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

never tried a cream ale, I always see the Samuel Adams on the shelf, but just pass it by

 

Don't think I would call Sam Adams a cream ale, but I like that too. But I think you probably like a few more IBU/ABV than ether of these.

 

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First taste of early bottle of Sir Kenneth blonde.  3 weeks in the LBK.  Then, I took one early 12 oz. bottle at 3 weeks and put it in the fridge for 5 days.  Tried it just now while listening to the Yankees score 6 runs against my Astros in the bottom of the first.

 

Outstanding blonde brew!  Great color.  Good carbonation.  A nice consistent and persistent head on it.  Some citrus taste.  Seems like this early bottle is pretty balanced.

 

I'll take a photo of the second bottle that I try in a few days.  The Astros might not be winning but this brew is!

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Usually our Collaboration recipes are limited, but we've decided to keep the Sir Kenneth around permanently. Proceeds will continue to be forwarded to John Chandler of Paladin Brewing for his medical bills.

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Just tried my second bottle of Sir Kenneth Blonde.  Even better than the first.  I wish I could describe the flavors.  Pretty balanced with a little hoppy taste.  Incredible mouthfeel and aroma.  Great color.  Nice head on it, too.  

 

I just ordered this recipe again, today!

 

Here's a photograph.  The proof isn't in the pudding...it's in the beer!

DSCN2871.JPG

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Sampled my first bottle of the Sir Kenneth Blonde tonight. Nice color, decent head on initial pour, clean-crisp blanced flavor with hints of fruit and spice. Over all a very good beer, one I will be purchasing again. 

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