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Wort Temps

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I know that there are various temperature ranges for the different worts to insure proper fermentation. Does anyone have a chart of the specific temps for the various worts? Maybe I should say, what are the temps for the various yeasts. I want to get this brewing thing right.

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If you follow the Mr. Beer instructions, using cold water, you never have to worry about pitching temps.

 

Using the Mr. Beer yeast, nearly all brews should be at 65 degree wort temp.

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Each yeast has temps listed - take a look at the ingredients section, but generally I don't think you can go wrong with 65 degrees. (Unless you are lagering, then you are looking at 55 degrees.)

 

Everyone seems to agree that going to the lower range of the yeast (the 65) is better than going to higher end of the range.

 

Now how precise you get is going to depend on your set up. How are you measuring wort temp...how are you controlling the temp, etc.

 

You can only do the best you can do and then keep getting better.

 

Right now I measure wort temp with a strip on the keg (on the top, not at the wort line, so there is one imprecise variant). I am keeping it cool with keg in a cooler and three frozen water bottles in it and a wet towel under it. (the bottles keep the towel cold, I am thinking that the wet towel helps to keep off the heat.)

 

It gets to be a 100 easily in my garage (where my set up is). Great for exercising and yoga...not so great for keeping fermenting beer cold. But like I said, you have to do your best.

 

So far for this batch, in this heatwave, it seems like I am holding temp at about 65-68.

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Thanks everyone for the advice. The reason I ask is because I, in the future want to attempt to brew a lager. As of now all I've done are ales and St. Patrick's stout.

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And over here on the other side of the country we are coming out of a nasty cold spell where daily highs were in the single digits. I had no problem keeping my temps down during high krausen but now as I enter my second week I'm fighting hard to keep 62 degrees (I have the lbk in a cooler kept close to the furnace. room closed of from rest of basement with a door. add a warm water bottle from time to time)  It's cold.  I worry and wonder when it becomes "too cold" and my little yeasties go dormant. hope it doesn't happen. Kind of like BBQ - "Slow and low"  but we do the best we can, right?

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I feel your pain.  -7° yesterday, 7° today, and then 53° tomorrow.  Good ole Northeast winters.

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Hey victory I would worry that a direct application of heat pad to lbk would compromise the product, no? Without some sort of buffer (towel? air?) wouldn't the bottom of the LBK begin to warm up . . .possibly too high? Maybe another approach would be to place the heat pad on the far end of the cooler instead of directly underneath?  Just thinking. . .trying to help.  Disclaimer , I've never used a heat pad so I don't actually know how warm they can/could get.

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One country...two sides. It hit 90 today on my coast. That puts my garage at around 100...and when my wife pulls the car in...115 probably.

 

 

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You want to ferment within the recommended temperature range of the yeast variety you are using. Many of us tend to favor the lower end of the range as it produces a "cleaner" flavor and aroma profile.  However, some beer styles you want to encourage certain flavors and aromas. My basement tends to run 62-64 during the winter (ambient air temperature), so the wort during active fermentation seems to stay below 70. I don't brew during the summer, when wort temperatures will easily exceed 72/74.

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CapeMan.....You are correct.   At first I elevated the LBK only about 1" up from the pad (the LBK sat on a couple of soy sauce dishes).   I now have the LBK about 3 to 4 inches up from the pad, which appears to be fine.  But yes, I could have ruined the batch from earlier.  I'll know in about 4 weeks when I drink it.  This is my very first batch, so I am still learning.  

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I've been doing a lot of research (forum stalking) regarding the Fermatis yeasts and a couple in particular. It seems that most US ale yeasts tend to behave very nicely in the low end of their range anywhere between low/mid 60's and very low 70's. Much higher than that and they can get a little out of control flavor-wise and very much under that, they just stop working. Lager yeasts want much colder temps. They tend to have a pretty broad range that they'll actively ferment in and when it's pushed too high, they'll go off the rails. A couple of exceptions that I found areSaflager S-23 and Safale K-97 (both suitable for the "Kolsch" I'm putting together). The S-23 is a bottom-fermenting Lager yeast that acts more like an ale yeast and seems to really like it's upper range (Mid 50's to low 60's) for clean fermentation. The K-97 is a top-fermenting ale yeast that acts like a lager yeast and works to much lower temp ranges than most ales. Though it'll ferment well at lager temps, reports have it that the esters produced get a little crazy and it prefers that same high 50's to low 60's range with anecdotes of fast, clean fermentation right up to 72 or so.

I guess the point is that with any particular yeast, the stats and profile will tell you where to start and other brewers' experiences can guide you in terms of what to expect in the real world.

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