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12 hours ago, MrWhy said:

Done.  Love this beer. A bit pricey....but who cares. I don't need food or clothes.

 

I hear you!  Between the recipie and the 2G fermenter, I spent close to $100 to brew this beer.  I can re-use the 2G fermenter.  Even still - totally worth it to keep growing and learning in this fascinating hobby!

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Saturday 5/6

 

Bottled up my Redo Ale, the rebrewing of my first beer. I am looking to brew a very drinkable Belgian Amber Ale. 

 

Bottling went fine but I guess I under filled the LBK because I only got 10 bottles, not my usual 11.

 

Sample was fine. A drinkable ale with a slight Belgian flavor from the yeast.  Kind of boring, but I guess the goal was to fix my first beer, and in that case I succeeded beyond measure.  Color seemed a bit pale from what I remember, not amber at all.

 

I am thinking that next time I brew this I am going to add some grains, and maybe swap out the saaz for a different hop. Zythos maybe.

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Sunday 5/7

 

Bottled up my Zythos Hopped CAL. What a complete crap show. Only got nine bottles. I've been under filling for some reason. And on the last the little spigot clogged.

 

Whatever. The sample was really good. I mean really, really good. So I am happy. 

 

Before I bottle my next two (La Noche and the Hopstimulator) I am going to cold crash. 

 

Next bit of news, everything is ready for my adventures in BIAB. Have my first all grain ingredients ready to go. Going to brew up a London Porter. I'm quite excited.

 

 

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Thinking tomorrow ill do a 5 gallon BIAB hefe. I have both the boys by myself tonight so i do believe i am allowed some fun alone time tomorrow night.  Should be a nice night in front of the dark star. 

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33 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Thinking tomorrow ill do a 5 gallon BIAB hefe. I have both the boys by myself tonight so i do believe i am allowed some fun alone time tomorrow night.  Should be a nice night in front of the dark star. 

 

Tomorrow I am going to brew up my first all grain, BIAB. A London Porter. 

 

Did a run through for my process.  I can get 4 gallons up to strike temp with ease and no problem bringing 4 to a boil.

 

I can fit my 5 gallon into the sink for an ice bath.

 

A few things I have not figured out yet....I did not have my ruler I ordered so I wasn't able to measure gallon levels or boil off rate.

 

Still have not decided if I am going to pour my chilled wort into the big pot after or get it into the LBK from there.

 

#soexcited

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9 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Tomorrow I am going to brew up my first all grain, BIAB. A London Porter. 

 

Did a run through for my process.  I can get 4 gallons up to strike temp with ease and no problem bringing 4 to a boil.

 

I can fit my 5 gallon into the sink for an ice bath.

 

A few things I have not figured out yet....I did not have my ruler I ordered so I wasn't able to measure gallon levels or boil off rate.

 

Still have not decided if I am going to pour my chilled wort into the big pot after or get it into the LBK from there.

 

#soexcited

 I just used a piece of quarter round for my yardstick . Ask your wife what that is if you don't know

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@Creeps McLane

 

I have started my BIAB adventures! A london porter from my LHBS. Original recipe is for 5.5 gallons and calculated at 60% efficiency. I just cut everything in half.

2.5 Gallon

Grains:

Pale 2 row - 5.25 lbs

Brown Malt - 8 oz

Crystal 40 - 8 oz

Chocolate - 2.5 oz

Pale Chocolate - 2.5 oz

mash at 152

 

Hops:

Fuggles .5 @ 60

Fuggles .25 @10

---

Using the simple biab calculator I started with 4.25 gallons of water in my big kettle. I brought it up to 165 (ish) and added my grain bag and grains. I stirred and turned off the temp, put on the lid. The temp dropped to below 160. Hard to tell with the brew thermometer, but it looked closer to the 160 than the 150 so I'm thinking 158. I know there is a difference between mashing at 152 vs. 158, but I just left it. It essentially held that temp for the duration of the mash.

 

For a variety of factors I decided I did not want to do either a mash out or a sparge. Mashout, I just didn't. Sparging, it is a logistics issue. I need one more pot to transfer the grains into after sparging and I didn't have it. I am not even sure how much I need it? Until I can measure for efficiency and gravity, I just won't know. So I lifted the bag out, let it drip, and I know I am not "supposed" to, but I went ahead and squeezed the bag a bit to get everything out.

 

After the grain, squeezing, etc. I ended up with about 3.6 gallons of wort. 

 

I am now in the process of the hop boil.

 

Will update with the next steps!

 

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Hop boil completed.

 

Using the tube and valve, I transferred the wort into the 5 gallon kettle. As it got to the level of the little hole thing, it sputtered and stopped (as I expected it would.) But when I tilted the kettle, it still wouldn't flow. I thought it might have clogged with gunk, but with my initial clean up it appears that was not the case. A flow/pressure thing? I don't know. I would like to start finding a way to get some of that gunk out. Irish moss? The more beer trub trapper?

 

Beer went into the 5 gallon and it seems like i have a shade under 3 gallons. Perhaps 2.75. Not bad at all. 

 

Due to scheduling issues, I don't have the time to wait for it to cool and transfer to fermenter right now. So a quick ice bath to get the wort cool enough that I could handle the kettle and it is now sitting in my fermentation fridge, set at 68, cooling down. If I get home in time and the wort is cool enough, I'll transfer to the LBK and pitch. If not...tomorrow AM I suppose.


Which kind of sucks because now I'll need to re-sanitize everything.

 

A note - apparently the smell of BIAB is a lot worse than extract (which my fam already hated.) The kid and wife were miserable. Which means I just might be picking up a propane burner and transferring to the garage. Or the wife and daughter are going to have some nice bonding time at the mall or something on days when I brew.

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Just made a 5 gallon SMaSH Saison (single malt, single hop) using a single-step decoction mash. I'm calling it "Smashing Lemons Saison".

 

10 lbs Pilsner Malt

1 oz Lemondrop @ 60 mins

1 oz Lemondrop @ 15 mins

1 oz Lemondrop @ FL

1 oz Lemondrop Dry-hop for 4 days

Zest of 2 lemons soaked in Everclear (added to the dry-hop)

1 Package of GigaYeast Saison #1 (GY018) - This is a French Saison yeast - drier and cleaner tasting than Belgian Saison yeasts

1 Whirlfloc tab

1 capsule of Servomyces yeast nutrient

 

1.051 OG

5% ABV

30 IBUs

3.5 SRM

 

Fermenting at 66 F to keep it clean tasting. I want to minimize the esters so they are just in the background.

 

This should be a crisp, dry, and sessionable summer saison. I'll keep you posted on how it comes out. :) 

 

 

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1 hour ago, MrWhy said:

Hop boil completed.

 

Using the tube and valve, I transferred the wort into the 5 gallon kettle. As it got to the level of the little hole thing, it sputtered and stopped (as I expected it would.) But when I tilted the kettle, it still wouldn't flow. I thought it might have clogged with gunk, but with my initial clean up it appears that was not the case. A flow/pressure thing? I don't know. I would like to start finding a way to get some of that gunk out. Irish moss? The more beer trub trapper?

 

Beer went into the 5 gallon and it seems like i have a shade under 3 gallons. Perhaps 2.75. Not bad at all. 

 

Due to scheduling issues, I don't have the time to wait for it to cool and transfer to fermenter right now. So a quick ice bath to get the wort cool enough that I could handle the kettle and it is now sitting in my fermentation fridge, set at 68, cooling down. If I get home in time and the wort is cool enough, I'll transfer to the LBK and pitch. If not...tomorrow AM I suppose.


Which kind of sucks because now I'll need to re-sanitize everything.

 

A note - apparently the smell of BIAB is a lot worse than extract (which my fam already hated.) The kid and wife were miserable. Which means I just might be picking up a propane burner and transferring to the garage. Or the wife and daughter are going to have some nice bonding time at the mall or something on days when I brew.

Im so proud of you ?

 

Try this next time, should help with the clogging. They make them in 12 and 6". 

Bazooka Screen for Homebrew Kettle or Mash Tun by The Weekend Brewer (12") https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01NBWUQ8L/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_mb6fzbQM0GND8

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3 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Im so proud of you ?

 

Try this next time, should help with the clogging. They make them in 12 and 6". 

Bazooka Screen for Homebrew Kettle or Mash Tun by The Weekend Brewer (12") https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01NBWUQ8L/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_mb6fzbQM0GND8

 

Many thanks!

 

Chilled wort transferred to LBK. Yeast pitched. LBK in fermenting fridge set at 68.

 

A few things....

 

I need to think through the transfer to LBK process. It did not go very smoothly. But it is a new process for me, so what can I say.

 

I resanitized everything. I used a measuring cup to transfer wort to LBK through strainer. I did not lay down towels, etc. and was not not prepared for the drip factor. The drip accumulated and became a real problem, which caused frustration. Next time lay towels and be more deliberate.

 

The size of the 5 gallon pot is a problem. I think instead of a 5 gallon pot, a smaller 3 to4 gallon pot would work really well. The 5 gallon pot has many uses, but I think I need the third kettle. Just easier overall to manage.

 

I really liked putting the kettle into the fermenting fridge and just walking away. It wont work all the time, based on what I've got going on.....but it is a real nice thing to have as an option...HMMMMM.....maybe I am over thinking this. I don't need to get wort down to pitching temps in the kettle....just get it down to a reasonable temp, transfer to LBK, throw in fridge until ready.......

 

@Creeps McLane showed me a nice filter. I think I need to explore this. I prefer to try an eliminate some of the stuff going into the beer. And work my process to eliminate more of this stuff each step.

 

Cleaning the BIAB bag.....yikes.....I need to work on this.

 

Overall I am pleased with the process and looking forward to exploring the world of all grain BIAB more.

 

Mr. Beer....do not fear! This was a long brewing day. I am really looking forward to the nice, simple familiar process of brewing up my Chinook IRA....with hop bags!

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38 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Many thanks!

 

Chilled wort transferred to LBK. Yeast pitched. LBK in fermenting fridge set at 68.

 

A few things....

 

I need to think through the transfer to LBK process. It did not go very smoothly. But it is a new process for me, so what can I say.

 

I resanitized everything. I used a measuring cup to transfer wort to LBK through strainer. I did not lay down towels, etc. and was not not prepared for the drip factor. The drip accumulated and became a real problem, which caused frustration. Next time lay towels and be more deliberate.

 

The size of the 5 gallon pot is a problem. I think instead of a 5 gallon pot, a smaller 3 to4 gallon pot would work really well. The 5 gallon pot has many uses, but I think I need the third kettle. Just easier overall to manage.

 

I really liked putting the kettle into the fermenting fridge and just walking away. It wont work all the time, based on what I've got going on.....but it is a real nice thing to have as an option...HMMMMM.....maybe I am over thinking this. I don't need to get wort down to pitching temps in the kettle....just get it down to a reasonable temp, transfer to LBK, throw in fridge until ready.......

 

@Creeps McLane showed me a nice filter. I think I need to explore this. I prefer to try an eliminate some of the stuff going into the beer. And work my process to eliminate more of this stuff each step.

 

Cleaning the BIAB bag.....yikes.....I need to work on this.

 

Overall I am pleased with the process and looking forward to exploring the world of all grain BIAB more.

 

Mr. Beer....do not fear! This was a long brewing day. I am really looking forward to the nice, simple familiar process of brewing up my Chinook IRA....with hop bags!

You sir are making beer! Congrats to you. Honestly you will notice a difference switching to all grain. This is a big step and its easy to get caught up in it but after a brew or two you will see yourself getting better and by then you'll know what works for you and what doesn't. Maybe you need a few more pieces, maybe you can make what you have work for you. Its all in your hands 

 

as far as your problems, no biggie. Youll get better as you go but it seems like you did pretty well for your first time. 

 

As far as transferring the wort. Again ill ask if a 5 gallon fermenter is a possibility. It will save you a lot of agony if you can work it.  Bazooka screen plus mesh strainer is guaranteed to keep all junk out of your fermenter. 

 

Wort chiller? Maybe, if feasible. I recommend it but maybe its just an extra cost that you dont need. A good solid cold break is a good thing! But... Your beer is yours, you brew it how you see fit. 

 

Once you get the hang of this BIAB thing you can walk away during the mash and do some cleaning or take a shower or whatever. Tonight i tidied up the garage while mine was going on.

 

in short, you do what you have to do. Myself or anyone else here may suggest a lot of things but in the end only you know what your limits are. I see you producing great beer. You seem to have a wonderful taste for great beer and damn it you will brew some too!!! I applaud you tonight for stepping out of the box and betting yourself as a homebrewer 

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Newspaper on the counter for the drips.

 

Ice blocks in the sink for cooling, made in used plastic containers.

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7 hours ago, MrWhy said:

@Creeps McLane

 

Moving into all grain is a big step for me. It is something I said I would never do because I didn't really believe I could ever do it. But here I am....a year an six into my life as a brewer and I just completed my first all grain session. And it wasn't a disaster! But this isn't because of any special talent. It's because i was blessed to find my way to this forum. 

 

Thank you for your support and help during this. And thank you to all my Mr. Beer peeps.. @MiniYoda  @RickBeer.... @Bonsai & Brew @KaijuBrew @HoppySmile! @MRB Josh R @MRB Josh B @MRB Tim @AnthonyC (miss you brother brewer!) @Shrike @Big Sarge @Nickfixit    ....and anyone I missed.

 ..

While I love both my wife and daughter deeply, they are not really committed to my growth as a brewer. (Although my wife has promised me she will learn to use a refractometer and do my gravity reading/testings.....)

 

Brewing has given me a deep joy and, if I am not getting to deep or sentimental, has honestly brought a bit of meaning to my existence. I love brewing beer. I love the malts...the hops...the yeast...the process. And, still being honest, I have no doubt without the support of the people on this forum I would have given up, moved along, etc.

 

Every single person who takes the time to read a post, like it, respond, give advice, ask a question.....thank you. I've never met any of you IRL (YET!) but I appreciate you all.

 

And with that...I am out for the night!

 

Mr Why - it is great to find something you love to do - stick with it while it gives you joy!

 

I got my kids into to brewing by making root beer batches with them.  My wife is a great cook in her own right.  Our running joke is she stays out of the beer making EXCEPT the point in every batch where the wort is poured into the fermenter.  I always joke that the secret ingredient in every batch is the love of my wife!

 

Like you, over the past months, I have discovered that I love the process of making beer too - even more than drinking it!  But that is fun too.  As the beers I make get better (or more to my taste) due to experience, better technique and all the great tips I get here - it is so fun to share them.

 

When I share a home brew with someone for the first time - I love the look on people's faces when they taste something home made.  Sometimes there is a look of trepidation followed by a taste and then surprised look and a smile when it actually tastes good!  That experience makes it a very fun hobby for me!

 

Keep up the good work!

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@MrWhy

When I split a 6 gal recipe into 3 LBKs I fortunately do it not as AG so I have less liquid to deal with. I will make partial mash and hop boils separately for each LBK if they are different brews, so 1 gal pot is good, and I can ladle out from that while holding it over the LBKs to limit drips. Same with the HME. So for an actual 5 gal container, I could suggest trying to get one with a spigot? I am assuming you do not based on cup comments. e.g.

https://www.morebeer.com/products/biab-brew-bag-kettle-kit.html?a_aid=homebrewing

http://www.beveragefactory.com/homebrew/pre-fermentation-equipment/anvil-brew-kettle-5-gal.html

http://www.northernbrewer.com/8-gal-megapot

https://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Bayou-Classic-Stainless-Steel-10-Gallon-Spigot-Pot/6660146/product.html

 

Then you could fill a quart or 1/2 gal jug as interim container for wort transfer in a controlled way.

Maybe you can find cheaper on sale or used.

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28 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

@MrWhy

When I split a 6 gal recipe into 3 LBKs I fortunately do it not as AG so I have less liquid to deal with. I will make partial mash and hop boils separately for each LBK if they are different brews, so 1 gal pot is good, and I can ladle out from that while holding it over the LBKs to limit drips. Same with the HME. So for an actual 5 gal container, I could suggest trying to get one with a spigot? I am assuming you do not based on cup comments. e.g.

https://www.morebeer.com/products/biab-brew-bag-kettle-kit.html?a_aid=homebrewing

http://www.beveragefactory.com/homebrew/pre-fermentation-equipment/anvil-brew-kettle-5-gal.html

http://www.northernbrewer.com/8-gal-megapot

https://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Bayou-Classic-Stainless-Steel-10-Gallon-Spigot-Pot/6660146/product.html

 

Then you could fill a quart or 1/2 gal jug as interim container for wort transfer in a controlled way.

Maybe you can find cheaper on sale or used.

 

My mash/boil kettle (8 gallons) has a spigot, but it is way too big to get into the sink for an ice bath. So I need to get the wort out of that kettle, into something manageable (my 5 gallon). That fits in the sink for the ice bath and fits in my mini fridge.

 

I'm going to look at that bazooka thing or maybe a false bottom for my boil kettle....a better funnel/strainer for transferring the wort. 

 

Rick beer said something about "newspaper" but I don't know what he means....do I lay my kindle down??? Haha. Just joking. Kind of. I have not had a newspaper in years.....but I am going to be more deliberate about laying down some towels and such. (I've got plenty of old towels for just this sort of thing. Also thinking of getting a nice 32 ounce ladle......or just grab an autosiphon. 

 

I've bot my IRA with chinook hops to brew up.......I want to get in one more BIAB session to hone my skill set before I take my summer break.

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Finally got my pale ale in the LBK. 

In two weeks I shall start a 5 gallon batch of my Spurgeon Farmhouse Ale, followed by a 2gal Hefeweizen and then a 5 gallon IPA featuring African hops

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On 5/14/2017 at 7:40 AM, KaijuBrew said:

 

Mr Why - it is great to find something you love to do - stick with it while it gives you joy!

 

I got my kids into to brewing by making root beer batches with them.  My wife is a great cook in her own right.  Our running joke is she stays out of the beer making EXCEPT the point in every batch where the wort is poured into the fermenter.  I always joke that the secret ingredient in every batch is the love of my wife!

 

Like you, over the past months, I have discovered that I love the process of making beer too - even more than drinking it!  But that is fun too.  As the beers I make get better (or more to my taste) due to experience, better technique and all the great tips I get here - it is so fun to share them.

 

When I share a home brew with someone for the first time - I love the look on people's faces when they taste something home made.  Sometimes there is a look of trepidation followed by a taste and then surprised look and a smile when it actually tastes good!  That experience makes it a very fun hobby for me!

 

Keep up the good work!

What kind of root beer batches? What size? I have a 5 gallon batch to make which will be my first batch ever. They say to naturally carb to put some yeast in it then refrigerate when its at the level you want. You have any experience with this?

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Sun 5/21

 

Bottled La Noche Obscura and Bottled that funky buddha IPA thing.

 

Wow.....I am not going to lie. Both of these are currently in the running for the best beer I've ever brewed. 

 

Next up to bottle is my all grain London Porter.

 

Due to unforeseen circumstances I MIGHT be shutting it down after this.  I'm going to try to avoid a yearlong spiritual quest....but we cannot always choose what the Great Brewer chooses for us.  

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WhyBrewingCo Tasting Weekend:

Imperial Porter bottled 3/4/17 (12 weeks conditioning as of tasting)

Brown Belgian Beast bottled 3/18/17 (10 weeks conditioning as of tasting)

Imperial Red Ale Plus bottled 4/15/17 (6 weeks conditioning as of tasting)

Slap Hoppy Stout bottled 3/25/17 (9 weeks conditioning as of tasting)

 

Imperial Porter: Huh....not my best beer. But not my worst. The banana flavor is still a bit too present. It is still not balanced, the malt sweetness needs a stronger hop bitterness and presence. And it is strong. As in headache the next day strong. I fermented this too warm. I'll have another one in a few weeks and end up saving a couple for a nice long while, but nothing says this one is a long-term keeper. 

 

Brown Belgian Beast - this was a crazy drunk brew. The first sample I tasted evoked the flavors of raw meat. So this one has come a long way because at this point it tastes like a sweet, strong, brown belgian. It is not great. I am not sure if it is even drinkable. The alcohol is very strong in this one. I mean, I can taste alcohol. But at this point it does not taste like raw meat, which is an improvement. I think this is one I am happy to give several months to before sampling again, just to see what happens.

 

Imperial Red Ale - WINNER!!!!! Great deep amber color. I upped this one with 3 smooth LME and some centennial and cascade hops. Legitimate great beer.  Love it. Great flavor, great balance. Strong but not overpowering....feeling there is not need to sit on this one. Just going to start putting it into the drinking cycle. 

 

Slap Hoppy Stout - WINNER!!!!! Wow.....according to my notes I decided not to note what I did. Which is both unfortunate and boldly invigorating. That being said this current version of the slap hoppy stout is in every way outstanding. I love this beer. The recipe is two saint pats and a robust, and some northern brewer and goldings. Not sure what I ended up doing, but whatever. I will accept my brilliance without question. Seriously, not many times I've been served a better strong stout. Thinking that this one, along with my Imperial IRA is going into the rotation immediately, with maybe one or two saved for longer conditioning. Or not.

 

So as it stands....IRA and Slap Hoppy are great beers and going into the the drinking mix now. The Imperial Porter sucks (my fault) and I see no reason to try to let it sit out. Will drink up and free the bottles (saving one). Brown Belgian...sucks.....but I'm going to sit this one out for awhile and just see what happens.

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Ordered 10 gallons worth of stout ingredients yesterday. Figuring ill make a split batch, 5 as a regular stout and the other 5 will have 4 oz of cocoa nibs and an undetermined amout of coffee. 

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Sake Tasting 5/29/17

 

Picking up the kid today from a friend's house and it turned out she wanted another half hour of chill time, which I was happy to oblige. Stopped at a nearby Asian market and decided to pick up some different sakes to try.

 

I am not unfamiliar with sake and have had several tastings over the years, but I am not in any way a sophisticated drinker of the brew. It has always been next on my list. Beer. Bourbon. Manhattans. Sake. We all should have well defined goals. 

 

Sake 1 - Sparkling Peach Sake.

ozekisparklingpeach.jpg.9efe85b6fb31ccd4090a31534ce8c5ce.jpg

 

Once at disneyworld I had an outstanding lemon sparkling sake that I've never been able to find again, but I have been looking. This is a fine drink and I could see it being the base for a nice summer cocktail or a wonderful summer evening picnic sake. But if you are looking for any sense of "traditional" this is probably not it. While I did not see it at my market, they also sell this in cans. And while I used the word traditional, I would like to point out that in japan, there really is no such thing as traditional. You can walk into a 7-11 and buy any of these in a can......along with whiskey highballs and whatever else you want.

 

Sake 2 - Pineapple Sake

pineapplesake.jpg.2fd1453b51ed3d545b6127ddedd72c4f.jpg

 

This one was really nice. It was not sparkling and it retained more of the traditional sake taste than the above. The above was a sparkling peach drink. This was a sake with mild hints of pineapple in the background. I really enjoyed it and it is a very drinkable 10%....which is to say I should probably watch out. I had a strong pour and it went a lot more quickly than it should.

 

Sake 3 - Traditional Junmai Sake

blackbottlesake.thumb.jpg.48a2df8e7812b5db8e20d03e1927d4c9.jpg

 

This was my "traditional sake" sake choice. Junmai sake (double check spelling and accuracy). It is a strong 14%. I like this a lot, but I really like sake. It is clean and clear. Very mild, in a good way. Polished and refined. Keep in mind that my palate is anything but polished and refined at this point, so it could be swill. But I do not think so. No haze at all in this one.  Planning on doing a sake tasting with some friends and I am putting this on the list. In fact, I am wondering if there is not any reason to just give myself a second really strong pout tonight.

 

All in all a good evening for sake. Over the next few weeks I am going to continue to build my knowledge base and expand my palate.

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Sat 6/3/17

 

Bottled the English Porter, my first BIAB beer. The sample was really good. Very fresh taste, good flavor. I am glad I went with half chocolate half pale chocolate. I think it cut down on the bitterness. And the goldings is present, but not it is not over hopped. I am looking forward to this one and do not see the need for a long conditioning time. I think three weeks should be just fine.

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I was thinking about brewing a stout on friday, but that didn't work out. The three year old is currently an insomniac. 

 

Thought i could sneak in maybe a PM MRB rye ipa brew tonight but that didnt work out. Three year old is currently an insomniac.

 

so instead while he ate popcorn and watched bob the builder i polished up three fermenters, two kettles and one cooler. When a brew day does present itself, i will be ready.

IMG_3076.JPG

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On 6/3/2017 at 10:14 PM, Creeps McLane said:

I was thinking about brewing a stout on friday, but that didn't work out. The three year old is currently an insomniac. 

 

Thought i could sneak in maybe a PM MRB rye ipa brew tonight but that didnt work out. Three year old is currently an insomniac.

 

so instead while he ate popcorn and watched bob the builder i polished up three fermenters, two kettles and one cooler. When a brew day does present itself, i will be ready.

IMG_3076.JPG

 

Wow. That is so beautiful. It brings a tear to my eye.....

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7 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Wow. That is so beautiful. It brings a tear to my eye.....

Its all about to do what it does in a few minutes. 

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Thu Jun 8, 2017

 

Sampling some of my home brews tonight. Having my Redo-Ale and going to have my Hopped CAL. The Redo Ale is the re-brew of my first beer. It uses the American Ale as a base with some more LMEs, Saaz, and t-58 for the yeast. The Hopped CAL was a Classic American Light hopped up with Zythos. Both have been conditioning for three  four weeks, which is a bit on the short side for me, but since I brew better now I'm thinking they should at least be drinkable. Plus neither of these were beers I was looking to age for a long time anyways.

 

Both beers bottled on weekend of 5/6.

 

Starting with my Redo Ale.  American ALE HME.  Booster. Gold LME. Smooth LME. Double Saaz at 5 minutes. T-58. This is not bad. It still tastes a bit young. Nice amber color. The saaz is a bit too present and overpowers some of the flavors of the yeast. I also fermented a bit too cool and should have upped the temps a bit to get a bit more out of the yeast. But I think if I give this one six weeks, that will be the sweet spot.

 

Next up is my Hopped CAL. I went with my base which is CAL, booster, Pale LME, Gold LME, and S-05 yeast. The hop schedule was .5 oz Chinook for 30, .5 oz zythos for 20, 1.0 oz zythos for 10, .5 Zythos for 5. This is not as good as I had hoped. I am wondering if the chinook was necessary and think it added the wrong bitterness. Or maybe the flavor of Zythos is not as good as the aroma. It definitely smells better than it tastes. It is not bad, but it is not working out either. I do like the aroma of the Zythos though. Or maybe there is just an off flavor. Hard to tell sometimes. I don't know if I am going to sit on this one. I don't really see the need. Will put this into the rotation and start drinking to free up some bottles.

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I have a Bavarian Weissbier that will be ready to bottle in two weeks that I'm going to add some Cherry Brewer's Extract to have some cherry wheat beers ready by the end of July.  Then brewing That Voodoo That You Do in July to be ready for the start of football season, the Pumpkin Weissbier recipe in August to be ready by October, and the Czech Pilsner refill with added Hallertu hops in September to be ready by November.

 

Currently have on hand a few Nilla Porters, Falconer's Millenium Red, Aztec Cerveza, and Diablo IPAs.

 

Kevin

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Cherry and clove?  

 

Several months back I brewed the standard Mr. Beer weissbier refill and added cherry extract at bottling.  It's been one of the tastiest beers I've brewed.

 

Kevin

cherrywheat.jpg

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if i could get a weekend without thunderstorms... and get out to go shopping... I have a chimay dubbel clone recipe with a decoction mash,  and a Belgian quad recipe that I am itching to try.

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8 minutes ago, zorak1066 said:

if i could get a weekend without thunderstorms... and get out to go shopping... I have a chimay dubbel clone recipe with a decoction mash,  and a Belgian quad recipe that I am itching to try.

Sooo. Decoction mash... I just watched a video on it. You ever done one before? I applaud the extra effort for sure. 

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ive done a pseudo decoction where you draw off some of the mash and bring it to a boil to carmelize it a bit.  ive done one where I took a lb of dme in I think 2 liters of water and boiled it down to less than half its volume before adding it to a 90 min boil.  this will be a single decoction mash.  will bring mash up to about 125f , draw off about 6 cups of gruel .. heat to 150f... rest it for 12-20 mins.. then raise to boiling for about 20 minutes.  stirring like mad the whole time of course.  then add back to mash tun til mash hits 152f. cover and  lower remaining decoction to 150ish before stirring into mash tun.  lot of extra work... but then again I love overcomplicating things. looking to hit all those extra notes you get in a trappist ale from decocting.

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6 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

ive done a pseudo decoction where you draw off some of the mash and bring it to a boil to carmelize it a bit.  ive done one where I took a lb of dme in I think 2 liters of water and boiled it down to less than half its volume before adding it to a 90 min boil.  this will be a single decoction mash.  will bring mash up to about 125f , draw off about 6 cups of gruel .. heat to 150f... rest it for 12-20 mins.. then raise to boiling for about 20 minutes.  stirring like mad the whole time of course.  then add back to mash tun til mash hits 152f. cover and  lower remaining decoction to 150ish before stirring into mash tun.  lot of extra work... but then again I love overcomplicating things. looking to hit all those extra notes you get in a trappist ale from decocting.

Ive heard it adds a very unique flavor and some sweetness to the finished beer. Not sure what styles i would use it for for my own tastes. 

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scotch ales or dubbels benefit from it.  totally unnecessary but adds to the flavor quality.

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It's been a bit since I've posted. Looking at my calendar, I have not had a weekend home in well over a month! Crazy times with a lot going on.

 

That being said, a few things. I sampled my all-grain BIAB London Porter. An outstanding beer and I'll do a full write up tomorrow. (Not tomorrow. I don't have any that are cold.)

 

Why Brewing Co is moving.......OUTSIDE! I've got my burner, my wort chiller, my propane tank. Everything is ready to go and I'm really excited for this. I CAN do BIAB on the stove, but the child does not like the smell and I'm to tender a soul to cause misery to my own offspring. But like I said, I'm excited.

 

I've got my next BIAB recipe. I'm just doing my own thing. Going with 9lbs Maris Otter, dry belle saison yeast, and going to bitter with a bit of chinook I have and flavor with some cascade. It is looking to come in (based on the brewing calculators) at 9%. 

 

I'm going big and bold because this one is going to ferment warm. My real fridge is on the fritz so my fermentation fridges are taking up the slack at the moment. Plus this brew is really less about the brew and more about learning my process for outdoor brewing. I figured, just go with something that will be a nice solid ABV, a yeast that can get naughty, and add hops.

 

I'll post more about the process, maybe even throw in some pics (safe for work) and do a full write up.

 

As always thanks to everyone who has offered me help and advice through this process!

 

Peace fellow brewers.

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On 5/13/2017 at 10:11 PM, Creeps McLane said:

You sir are making beer! Congrats to you. Honestly you will notice a difference switching to all grain. This is a big step and its easy to get caught up in it but after a brew or two you will see yourself getting better and by then you'll know what works for you and what doesn't. Maybe you need a few more pieces, maybe you can make what you have work for you. Its all in your hands 

 

 

 

@Creeps McLane - you good sir are right. I sampled the London porter a bit back, and it was a great beer. I absolutely loved it.

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Getting used to the timing of BIAB/all-grain is a switch. 60+ minutes for a mash.....60 minute hop boil.....I just realized no way I would have time this AM. I am either going to brew this up this evening (cooler too) or wait until tomorrow when I have no commitments other than eating burgers and hot dogs and drinking some beer.

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First outdoor all grain brew today. 

 

Set up up and ready.IMG_5137.JPG.04d7350f43543822c030d4a761b1f290.JPG

 

Got the water going up to 170 with ease. 

 

Once water was at temp, added the 9 pounds of Maris Otter.

 

IMG_5140.JPG.e4dcfe552e20917b663caa5c90625bf9.JPG

 

I let it mash at 160. Temp held really well.  I ended up just letting it sit for 75 minutes. By then temp had dropped to 150.

 

IMG_5141.JPG.2bf41199223b22f44c94bd2ce6855169.JPG

 

I don't do mashouts or anything crazy yet. I don't spare since I'm going full boil. I pull the bag out and let it drip. Then I squeeze. Yes, it is frowned upon. But I squeeze with no shame.

 

IMG_5142.JPG.1427c86a5b299a7b5f913d0e7c414eec.JPGWort ready to boil.

 

IMG_5143.JPG.9c53f9adc30090555f4e3ff62c411943.JPG

 

Wort foam! I did not let it boil over.

 

IMG_5145.JPG.748ac0e2c6bd54dfdd37c0e02d9fa90a.JPG 

 

First hop addition- .5 oz chinook. 60. Second was another .5 chinook with a smattering of cascade at 30. (Don't ask). .25 cascade at 15. .35 at 5

 

IMG_5147.JPG.8fc4685d641b37cf0b08df26557a19f1.JPG

 

Chillin! Wort chill in effect. Yes. That is a snowman oven mitt. No shame in the game.

 

Didnt get any pics of the transfer to the LBK but it was seamless.

 

Pitched the saison yeast and this bad boy is in cooler fermenting naturally. No temp control. What happens happens.

 

IMG_5148.JPG.a030b785e574eef101533aa82b63834d.JPG

 

Three weeks and I will bottle.

 

Not sure how this is going to turn out. I did not really put a lot of thought into this beer. I just wanted to get a brew in to start learning my outdoor process.

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@MrWhy looks great! 

 

Im a squeezer, and then a poker and a resqueezer. But its all done with loving hands and not abusive ones. 

 

Really digging the oven mit...

 

whats it fermenting at? The lower the temp, the less funky it will be. Anything below 70 i feel will still have more of a pale ale feel than a saison. Which would be fine. Your ingredients look like the makings of a wonderful pale ale.

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On 7/4/2017 at 6:54 AM, Creeps McLane said:

@MrWhy looks great! 

 

Im a squeezer, and then a poker and a resqueezer. But its all done with loving hands and not abusive ones. 

 

Really digging the oven mit...

 

whats it fermenting at? The lower the temp, the less funky it will be. Anything below 70 i feel will still have more of a pale ale feel than a saison. Which would be fine. Your ingredients look like the makings of a wonderful pale ale.

 

Should be anywhere from the mid 70s to high 80s. Possibly higher, so we should have plenty of funk. 

 

I am down with this whole outdoor BIAB thing, but now I understand why it is called a brew DAY. Took a lot longer than I was expecting. If I find a beer I really like, I may attempt to up it to a 5 gallon brew........we will see.

 

The process was easy enough even in this learning stage. I've never worked with propane before. All my BBQing is charcoal.....but it was simple. I did not blow anything up or set anything on fire. Shocked at how much HEAT is produced. Even standing over it to add hops or stir was like "whoa."

 

Not completely happy with my concord burner. Quality is lame. BUT.....I did get it on sale (25% off!) AND because of the lame quality when I called to complain they knocked some more dollars off the price. So in the end the thing cost me less than 40 bucks. And it brought everything to temp very fast. Much faster than my two burner stovetop set up.

 

The whole thing should be easier next time. I understand the flow better, know what can be set up earlier, what can wait until mashing time, boil time, etc.

 

@Creeps McLane or anyone else.......dumb question......how do I know how much propane I have left in the tank????

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16 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Should be anywhere from the mid 70s to high 80s. Possibly higher, so we should have plenty of funk. 

 

I am down with this whole outdoor BIAB thing, but now I understand why it is called a brew DAY. Took a lot longer than I was expecting. If I find a beer I really like, I may attempt to up it to a 5 gallon brew........we will see.

 

The process was easy enough even in this learning stage. I've never worked with propane before. All my BBQing is charcoal.....but it was simple. I did not blow anything up or set anything on fire. Shocked at how much HEAT is produced. Even standing over it to add hops or stir was like "whoa."

 

Not completely happy with my concord burner. Quality is lame. BUT.....I did get it on (25% off!) AND because of the lame quality when I called to complain they knocked some more dollars off the price. So in the end the thing cost me less than 40 bucks. And it brought everything to temp very fast. Much faster than my two burner stovetop set up.

 

The whole thing should be easier next time. I understand the flow better, know what can be set up earlier, what can wait until mashing time, boil time, etc.

 

@Creeps McLane or anyone else.......dumb question......how do I know how much propane I have left in the tank????

 

Pour a glass of hot water down the side of the tank, then run your hand down from the top along the path you poured the water.  Where the tank is warm, it's empty.  When it starts feeling cool, that's your propane level.

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3 minutes ago, Shrike said:

 

Pour a glass of hot water down the side of the tank, then run your hand down from the top along the path you poured the water.  Where the tank is warm, it's empty.  When it starts feeling cool, that's your propane level.

 

Shrike is a living fountain of knowledge and wisdom. 

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2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

but now I understand why it is called a brew DAY.

LOL.  I hear ya...  Its funny how that jump from MRB to BIAB adds time to the brew day.  Going to 5 gals wont add much more time, jumping to 10 gals adds a little more too, but with each step you are getting so much more.  That's what I remind myself when I have days like my last brew day that took 9 hours from start to clean up. I got 30 gals though, so overall the time sure seems worth it.

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2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

how do I know how much propane I have left in the tank????

I like @Shrike's answer.  I've never tried that.  I weigh mine.  The tank itself is ~15#.  A full tank with 4.7 gals, which weighs 20#, in it is ~35#.  If at all possible, if you have one locally, go to a place to refill vs exchange.  It's much cheaper.  My wife flipped one for me Saturday and got a good deal on it for $17.99.  Now, if that tank was fully empty, that would be ~$3.83/gallon.   I had my 2 filled (topped off) last night for $2.49/gallon.  If it were empty (neither were), that would be $11.70/tank. Even at the "good deal" price for an exchange (vs like Home Depot or Lowes for $19.99), you can see it's better to refill... especially once you start doing more and more BIABs and need more propane more often.

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1 hour ago, MrWhy said:

 

Shrike is a living fountain of knowledge and wisdom. 

 

I use charcoal exclusively now, but when I was still working long days I always used propane for the speed and convenience.  After having a tank run out mid-way through a beer-can chicken I vowed "NEVER AGAIN!" while shaking my fist at the tank with a baleful glare in my eyes.  I learned the hot water trick shortly thereafter from the guy I bought propane from.

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13 hours ago, MrWhy said:

First outdoor all grain brew today. 

 

Set up up and ready.IMG_5137.JPG.04d7350f43543822c030d4a761b1f290.JPG

 

Got the water going up to 170 with ease. 

 

Once water was at temp, added the 9 pounds of Maris Otter.

 

IMG_5140.JPG.e4dcfe552e20917b663caa5c90625bf9.JPG

 

I let it mash at 160. Temp held really well.  I ended up just letting it sit for 75 minutes. By then temp had dropped to 150.

 

IMG_5141.JPG.2bf41199223b22f44c94bd2ce6855169.JPG

 

I don't do mashouts or anything crazy yet. I don't spare since I'm going full boil. I pull the bag out and let it drip. Then I squeeze. Yes, it is frowned upon. But I squeeze with no shame.

 

IMG_5142.JPG.1427c86a5b299a7b5f913d0e7c414eec.JPGWort ready to boil.

 

IMG_5143.JPG.9c53f9adc30090555f4e3ff62c411943.JPG

 

Wort foam! I did not let it boil over.

 

IMG_5145.JPG.748ac0e2c6bd54dfdd37c0e02d9fa90a.JPG 

 

First hop addition- .5 oz chinook. 60. Second was another .5 chinook with a smattering of cascade at 30. (Don't ask). .25 cascade at 15. .35 at 5

 

IMG_5147.JPG.8fc4685d641b37cf0b08df26557a19f1.JPG

 

Chillin! Wort chill in effect. Yes. That is a snowman oven mitt. No shame in the game.

 

Didnt get any pics of the transfer to the LBK but it was seamless.

 

Pitched the saison yeast and this bad boy is in cooler fermenting naturally. No temp control. What happens happens.

 

IMG_5148.JPG.a030b785e574eef101533aa82b63834d.JPG

 

Three weeks and I will bottle.

 

Not sure how this is going to turn out. I did not really put a lot of thought into this beer. I just wanted to get a brew in to start learning my outdoor process.

Awesome job, Mr. Why!!!!  ????

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23 hours ago, kedogn said:

LOL.  I hear ya...  Its funny how that jump from MRB to BIAB adds time to the brew day.  Going to 5 gals wont add much more time, jumping to 10 gals adds a little more too, but with each step you are getting so much more.  That's what I remind myself when I have days like my last brew day that took 9 hours from start to clean up. I got 30 gals though, so overall the time sure seems worth it.

 

Adding to that, I did not really comprehend that being outside means weather matters. It was a HOT day, even starting in the late afternoon. And it wasn't even the hottest day of the week!  I really would not want to brew outside during one of the really hot summer days, no matter what time I started.

 

Which makes me realize I will always have a place for some nice Mr. Beer brews. Just ordered two batches to brew up some Hoppy CALs. Looking forward to some short, easy, inside brew sessions.

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1 hour ago, MrWhy said:

Adding to that, I did not really comprehend that being outside means weather matters. It was a HOT day, even starting in the late afternoon. And it wasn't even the hottest day of the week!  I really would not want to brew outside during one of the really hot summer days, no matter what time I started.

I am assuming by this you are just talking about overall temperature for you yourself being comfortable.... but what you also need to take into account with the hotter weather is the affect on your mash temperature (obviously, colder can make a difference as well).  Take as an example the friend of mine that brewed at Manfish yesterday for us.  He told me that his mash temp was spot on after mashing in.  As usual, he put the lid on and checked it 15 minutes later.  To his surprise the temp went up almost a couple degrees.  On a typical brew day for us, this don't happen, it either holds true, or starts to drop.  He removed the lid and another 15 minutes later he realized it was up a couple 10th of a degree more.  At this point when he emailed me, I asked him where the sun was... his reply was, "Directly on the mash tun".  Had he not checked the temp when he did, the mash temp would have continued to rise at that pace (more than likely) and could have been well out of range for the beer he was brewing.   The weather, when brewing outdoors, can have a few effects on a brew day for sure :) 

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July 12, 2017

 

Taking it Back to the Old School

--

Decided to get in a nice old school Mr. B session and brew up a Hoppy CAL using 3 packs of Falconer Flight hops. Went with 2 pale LME, 1 Golden LME, Brought those to a boil and did 2 packs with a 5 minute boil, then threw in the third pack at flameout. After stirred in the CAL HME. Looking forward to this one. I've always wanted to get a good sense of this hop.

 

A few notes -

* While I am loving BIAB and partial mashes, and all that, I cannot lie that it was REALLY nice doing a simple, quick, Mr. B brew. 

* For anyone reading this who is just starting out, keep brewing and master the process. I'm not suggesting I've mastered the process, but I am so much better now than I was when I started.  

* I'm done with hop sacks.

* I'm done with longer boils for my Hoppy CALs. All hop additions are going to be in the five to flameout range.

* I'm done with trying to pour hot wort. I'm giving everything an ice bath and bringing it down to manageable temp before I pour.

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8 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

July 12, 2017

 

Taking it Back to the Old School

--

Decided to get in a nice old school Mr. B session and brew up a Hoppy CAL using 3 packs of Falconer Flight hops. Went with 2 pale LME, 1 Golden LME, Brought those to a boil and did 2 packs with a 5 minute boil, then threw in the third pack at flameout. After stirred in the CAL HME. Looking forward to this one. I've always wanted to get a good sense of this hop.

 

A few notes -

* While I am loving BIAB and partial mashes, and all that, I cannot lie that it was REALLY nice doing a simple, quick, Mr. B brew. 

* For anyone reading this who is just starting out, keep brewing and master the process. I'm not suggesting I've mastered the process, but I am so much better now than I was when I was started.  

* I'm done with hop sacks.

* I'm done with longer boils for my Hoppy CALs. All hop additions are going to be in the five to flameout range.

* I'm done with trying to pour hot wort. I'm giving everything an ice bath and bringing it down to manageable temp before I pour.

Why, Mr. Why.  It sounds like you've put together a very nice simple beer!  Isn't weird how we keep saying "simple" and "easy" when it comes to Mr. Beer recipes that gave us fits only 1+ yrs ago?  :)

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2 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Why, Mr. Why.  It sounds like you've put together a very nice simple beer!  Isn't weird how we keep saying "simple" and "easy" when it comes to Mr. Beer recipes that gave us fits only 1+ yrs ago?  :)

 

Right!

 

I was thinking about how nonchalant and chill it has become. I know enough to be able to enjoy the process and not stress. 

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July 17, 2017

 

Brewed up a Hoppy Cal, Ekuanot.

--

 

2 pale LME, 1 gold. pour into warm water then bring to a boil. 

3 packs Ekuanot hops

8 minute

4 minute

flameout

 

Stir in CAL

 

Ice bath to bring temp down, pour to LBK, top with room temp water. Whisk and pitch....then whisk again.......(explain later.)

 

LBK is now sitting in fridge set to 68...which means it will hover between 65 and 68 for the next three weeks until bottling.

--

Okay, two things a bit different here:

1.  For this batch there were some float-ey things going on with the LMEs. I am not sure if it was proteins, but I've never really noticed them before. Biggish clumps. hmmmmm........I figured eff it, anything bad is going to die in the boil, but still, especially combined with the next issue...

2.  After I whisked, the wort in the LBK had a foam MONSTER sitting on the top. Am I just getting better at whisking? I mean I whisked the sh!t out of this one. Am I getting better at lowering the wort temp? Both????? I don't know. But I was a bit confused as to what to do. Wait and let the foam settle? Pitch onto the foam? I decided to pitch onto the foam.....but then that seemed stupid to let all my little yeast friends rest on foam when what they wanted to do was get into the wort and make me beer.....so I ended up gently whisking again to make sure they got into the wort.

 

Whatever. Beer will happen one way or the other. That is my attitude.

 

I am not sure if that is a sign of my growth as a brewer....I have complete faith in yeast and wort to do their thing and will not stress.....or if it is a sign that I am getting too comfortable.....I am an Icarus rising to the sun and destined to crash to the earth, bones crushed and no beer for me.....

 

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Tasting Notes -

 

Hopped CAL - Base bittered with Chinook, Zythos hop for flavor and aroma.

 

This one was bottled on May 7, 2017. So we are about 10 weeks in. My last tasting I was a bit disappointed with the bittering. I felt it was too bitter and that did not let the Zythos shine through. I planned on not saving any and just drinking through the stock.

 

I am not deliberately aging these, but other beers have been calling so they have been sitting.

 

My original notes still hold true. This has a bitter, IPA like bite from the chinook, and honestly from the way I did the hop additions for the Zythos back then. But I like the beer now more than I did before. It is summer, and during the summer I tend to drink more IPAs, so perhaps my palate for "bitter" is back. Because what before was a bit of a bite that overpowered the hops, now I am tasting it as a nice IPA kick on the tongue with a pleasant flavor and aroma from the Zythos.

 

This is a good beer that I did not give enough credit earlier.

 

I like the Zythos hop. I think I am going to try and work an Imperial IPA with these as a heavy late addition. After I do my Cascade vs. Centennial Hopped CAL. And after I do my two Mexi-Belgi brews.  And my next all grain brew....my Very Simple Quad.....and my All Grain Pale Ale.....so many brews....so little time..... 

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Tasting Notes

Lock Stock Barrel Stout, Bottled on April 1, 2017

 

I'm not going to go back and look up my notes on brewing this, but if I recall I forgot the chocolate malt. Other than that I brewed this per recipe instructions.

 

I know the instructions say six months to a year....but I decided it was time to try one. We are at 15 weeks, almost 4 months. That is enough time to test a bottle.

 

Color is deep. Almost black. Slight lacing. Not a lot of head on the top, but I wasn't expecting it. Nose is the Irish Stout with a strong oak and whiskey scent. Strong in a good way. it complements the stout scent.

 

Taste is outstanding. It has a great body and mouth feel. There is a slight bitterness (as there should be) that is balanced by the additions of the grains. Lots of flavor. The oak and whiskey are there, but in the background.

 

I want to say I purchased this recipe kit on sale, but it was still expensive.  HOWEVER.....good bourbon barrel aged stouts come in at a hefty price. This matches almost any bourbon barrel age stout I've purchased. It is a great beer with a great flavor.

 

I am not sure if I am going to keep aging this one. I'm not really getting the sense that it needs any more time. (Caveat.....I live in a warm area so my beers tend to develop quickly.)

 

I love this beer.

 

I am going to brew it again, but rework it a bit. I am going to tone it down a little (I cannot believe I just said this......) I'll go one HME, 1 smooth, 1 robust, and up the grains.......

 

 

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37 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

Tasting Notes

Lock Stock Barrel Stout, Bottled on April 1, 2017

 

I'm not going to go back and look up my notes on brewing this, but if I recall I forgot the chocolate malt. Other than that I brewed this per recipe instructions.

 

I know the instructions say six months to a year....but I decided it was time to try one. We are at 15 weeks, almost 4 months. That is enough time to test a bottle.

 

Color is deep. Almost black. Slight lacing. Not a lot of head on the top, but I wasn't expecting it. Nose is the Irish Stout with a strong oak and whiskey scent. Strong in a good way. it complements the stout scent.

 

Taste is outstanding. It has a great body and mouth feel. There is a slight bitterness (as there should be) that is balanced by the additions of the grains. Lots of flavor. The oak and whiskey are there, but in the background.

 

I want to say I purchased this recipe kit on sale, but it was still expensive.  HOWEVER.....good bourbon barrel aged stouts come in at a hefty price. This matches almost any bourbon barrel age stout I've purchased. It is a great beer with a great flavor.

 

I am not sure if I am going to keep aging this one. I'm not really getting the sense that it needs any more time. (Caveat.....I live in a warm area so my beers tend to develop quickly.)

 

I love this beer.

 

I am going to brew it again, but rework it a bit. I am going to tone it down a little (I cannot believe I just said this......) I'll go one HME, 1 smooth, 1 robust, and up the grains.......

 

 

Nice review, Mr. Why!  I'm looking forward to having one of these.  My only mod to the recipe was adding a 3rd Saint Pat's.  8mths down....  4 to go.

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Friday, July 28, 2017

 

Doing a kick ass double brew session. Just finished my Otra Noche.

 

Grains - Victory, Crystal 60, Red Wheat Flakes - mashed at 160-150 for 50 minutes

Add 1 Pale LME, 2 cups powdered coconut sugar

Bring to boil

At boil add 1 pack mesquite flour, 2 diced ancho chiles

Add 2 packs warrior hops

Boil all 5-6 minutes

Flameout, add 2 czech pilsner HMEs

Ice bath,

Pitch T-58

Put in the ferment fridge set at 70 degrees.

 

Already started the Stralende Sonrisa!

 

Grains - 2 packs 2 row, Cyrstal 15, Red wheat flakes, mashing at 160 - 150 for 50 minutes

Bring to boil, stir in 2 cups agave nectar

Nugget Hops - 10 minutes

Mosiac, El Dorado, Faclon, Cascade - 5 minutes

Flameout, add Pale LME, Aztec HME

Ice Bath, pitch T-58

Ferment at 70 degrees.

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Looks like some great recipes@MrWhy! Never used coconut sugar in brewing before. Let us know how it turns out!

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21 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

Looks like some great recipes@MrWhy! Never used coconut sugar in brewing before. Let us know how it turns out!

 

Thank you Maestro!

 

The coconut sugar has a great taste and flavor. I was thinking I am going to use it in my coffee tomorrow, then it hit me....I am going to use it in a stout.

 

I am not sure how much coconut flavor will come out, but I am thinking my next Mr. Beer batches are going to be variation of the Lock, Stock and Barrel with Coconut sugar and rum soaked oak chips, and then a straight stout, but with some grains to freshen it up and coconut sugar to add a nuance and some ABV.

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Finished the Stralende Sonrisa.

 

I haven't done a Mr. B partial mash in awhile. I've changed my process up a bit, and not sure if it gets me "better" results, but it works better for my flow.

 

Essentially, I put the grains in the "big" pot with more than enough water. Get that to temp and then mash for as long as I have decided. (Today it was 50 minutes each batch.) At end of mash drain, pour some hot liquid over, and squeeze (I know. Don't judge me.)

 

Then depending, add what I need and bring that to a boil. It is one less pan and it fits my stove/style.

 

Another thing. I HATE pouring the LME/HME into the pot with a hop sack in it because the LME/HME gets on the sack. I hate that. So today I removed the hops sacks (I did not go commando), put them in the strainer getting them out of the way, then I poured the HME/LME in. Much happier.

 

These are both sitting in the fermenter at 70. Hoping to get some Belgian flavors out of the T-58. Plenty of towels under and around just in case one of them goes insane.

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Upcoming brew schedule?  still planning........perhaps in September.

 

wheats

 

ales

 

Lots of planning, considering it is close to family holiday season..........

 

 

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So many possibilities!  These I know for sure:

 

Sept - Butternut Squash Ale, Spiced Pumpkin Ale, Pumpkin Latte Stout

Oct - Juniper Berry IPA, Phat Tyre, Peanut Butter Cookie Stout

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2 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

So many possibilities!  These I know for sure:

 

Sept - Butternut Squash Ale, Spiced Pumpkin Ale, Pumpkin Latte Stout

Oct - Juniper Berry IPA, Phat Tyre, Peanut Butter Cookie Stout

would you mind sharing your phat tyre recipe? I love that stuff and wouldn't mind trying a clone. 

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August 4, 2017

 

Just finished bottling my Hoppy CAL, falcon edition.

 

CAL HME, 2 pale LME, 1 gold LME, triple hopped with Falcon, 2 @ 5, one at flameout.

 

10 big bottles. As is standard for me, did not taste particularly great at sample. 

 

I am only going 3 weeks on this. I really want to get these early and taste the falcon hops.

 

@MRB Josh R -

 

Question - what would be a good, simple beer I could use to compare/contrast at a sampling to really bring out the hops in my Hoppy CALs? I am thinking a Miller Lite? 

 

I just want a very neutral ale I can drink and then drink my hoppy cal? 

 

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August 5, 2017

 

IMG_5357.JPG.49014ef4d84b58e38cbfcd049855f740.JPG

 

Getting ready to bottle my Hoppy CAL, Ekuanot edition. While the bottles are all lined up and sanitizing, I am sampling my all-grain  saison. Maris Otter and cascade (well, hopped with chinook, but whatever.) Depending on my efficiency, this bad boy could be anywhere from 6 to 25% ABV.

 

I fermented plenty warm, so it's got a nice Saison funk going.

 

Will commence to bottling soon.

----

August 5 continued -

 

Hoppy CAL - Ekuanot Edition bottled.

 

We will see how this one turns out.

 

NOTE TO SELF - look closely at the Thunder Bay IPA hop schedule - replicate for my Hoppy CALs.....

Not exactly sure I am/was on the right track going all in on the late edition hops. Might need some in the 15/20 minute range to really maximize flavor.

 

Going to to brew some more Hoppy CALs, using the Thunder Bay hopping schedule. 

 

 

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Wed August 9 - Added anejo soaked oak chips to La Otra Noche

 

Friday August 11 - added fresh pack of Mr. B yeast to La Otra Noche

 

 

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Tasting Notes

8/12/17

 

Slap Hoppy Stout, bottled 3/25 - approximately 20 weeks conditioning.

 

In case you don't know, the Slappy Hoppy stout is an 8% stout consisting of 2 St. Pat's, 1 Robust, and dry hopped with Goldings and Northern Brewer.

 

I am almost positive I went with 2 or 3 robust to bring it to 9 or 10, and I know I did not dry hop, but probably went with a 5 minute hop addition. (I did not take notes on how I did this.)

 

First off, this is a really good stout. However, at this point, the hop flavor and aroma has faded dramatically from previous tastings. It is now much more a winter stout. I think I like the hoppier/younger version better, but that could just be that it is currently something like 185 degrees here.

 

If I were to do this one again.....

2 St. Pat's LMEs 

2 robust LMEs

1 cup sugar

approx 10% ABV (go big or go home)

--

Steeping grains - 2 packs 2 rows brewer, oats, carapils.....

--

2 packs goldings, 2 packs northern brewer.....2 of them at 5, 2 of them at flameout. (I don't dry hop.)

--

Plan to drink at the 8 to 12 week mark to hop flavor and aroma.

 

 

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On 7/29/2017 at 8:06 AM, AnthonyC said:

So many possibilities!  These I know for sure:

 

Sept - Butternut Squash Ale, Spiced Pumpkin Ale, Pumpkin Latte Stout

Oct - Juniper Berry IPA, Phat Tyre, Peanut Butter Cookie Stout

Peanut butter cookie stout sounds amazing. Is this a kit or recipe?

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13 hours ago, morriganpoe said:

Peanut butter cookie stout sounds amazing. Is this a kit or recipe?

It's going to be something that I put together w/the biggest addition being powdered peanut butter.  Once I get it completely sketched out I'll fwd the recipe to you...  Most likely you'll have to remind me.  ???

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On 8/14/2017 at 7:52 AM, AnthonyC said:

It's going to be something that I put together w/the biggest addition being powdered peanut butter.  Once I get it completely sketched out I'll fwd the recipe to you...  Most likely you'll have to remind me.  ???

 

Have you had the Belching Beaver Peanut Butter Milk Stout?

 

On nitro it such a great beer....but only 5.3 ABV.....practically water.

 

When you get your recipe post it!!!!! I'd love to see it.

 

One of my goals....one day...is an imperial peanut butter milk stout at like.....9% ABV.

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21 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Have you had the Belching Beaver Peanut Butter Milk Stout?

 

On nitro it such a great beer....but only 5.3 ABV.....practically water.

 

When you get your recipe post it!!!!! I'd love to see it.

 

One of my goals....one day...is an imperial peanut butter milk stout at like.....9% ABV.

You got it Mr. Why! :)

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this Friday. Paul's pantry pale. This will wipe out my grain inventory and also my hops that are over a year old. Im excited to brew this and get some new ingredients in the brew cave. 

IMG_4559.thumb.JPG.0ee6f88e8aabf4df2b93f013f9400a82.JPG

 

#winteriscoming

#johnsnowwinterwarmer

#ariasredrevenge

#strandsofsansaamber

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Sometime in the not so distant future... you ready for this? 10 gallon batch split. 5 gallons being a dunkel and then possibly the other 5 getting watered down a lil and using a Saison yeast for a dark Belgian grisette? Sounds pretty good for winter. 

 

#castleblackbelgian 

#whydoesthattygarianhavehairsoblackbelgian

#slamajammadunkel

#idonthavemuchforadunkel

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I just bought 150+ lbs of grain, almost 2 lbs of hops, and 10 various yeasts. I'm ready for some fall / winter brewing baby! 

 

First brew, tomorrow will be a 10 gallon split batch. Last round of Pantry brews.

 

1 MRB northwest pale ale 

1 MRB Diablo IPA

1 MRB Churchills Nutbrown

1 Coopers pale ale

1 Breiss Sorghum 

4 oz rye malt

4 oz golden promise

4 oz white wheat

4 oz red wheat

3 oz mild malt

3 oz extra special malt

4 oz raw merit barley

1/2 oz warrior @ 10

1/2 oz warrior @ 5

1/2 oz warrior @ 0

1 packet of MGJ empire ale

1 mason jar of harvested lager yeast

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a very sad image of MiniYoda staring at the computer screen, salivating, and wondering.....

 

Can I bring the wings?  and the steaks?  and the mac & cheese?  and the green bean casserole?  and the pumpkin pie for desert?

 

 

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21 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

a very sad image of MiniYoda staring at the computer screen, salivating, and wondering.....

 

Can I bring the wings?  and the steaks?  and the mac & cheese?  and the green bean casserole?  and the pumpkin pie for desert?

 

 

Please, come live here for a month to help me clear these kegs. That's what's slowing me down. I haven't brewed in 2-3 weeks now to let myself catch up to my pipeline. 

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I just bought 1100# of grain (+100# of dextrose) and I am hoping it gets me through the next 6-7 weeks.  I remember when going and getting 1-2 50# bags of 2-row seemed like a truck load. Now I have palettes delivered to me lol.

 

A big part of that will be 2 double batches of my 12% Triple IPA, “R U Ready?!?”.  Each batch is almost 100# of grain. It also has to sit 9 weeks so we need to brew it by 11/4 so it’s ready for the NFL Playoffs. :) 

 

39EB0CEB-A152-407B-B46C-C60E20A03FB6.thumb.jpeg.10d4c5fd3d9ff3b69433118a487d790f.jpeg

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ROAD TRIP!!!!!!!!

 

except for two problems.  I don't know where you live.  And I don't know where I live. 

 

But I'll be there as soon as I sort things out

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11 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Im gonna brew an amber with mosaic and bavarian yeast. 🖕🏼Style guidelines

I am not sure about he Bavarian yeast... but my next beer that I'm brewing is going to be basically a hoppy amber, using a couple # of Mosaic.  It will be my first time using Mosaic and since I told people a couple years ago "You will know I sold out when I brew with Mosaic" (not a fan) I am considering calling it "I Sold Out!"  lol  Will probably go with "Chaos Ensues" though :) 

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3 hours ago, kedogn said:

I am not sure about he Bavarian yeast... but my next beer that I'm brewing is going to be basically a hoppy amber, using a couple # of Mosaic.  It will be my first time using Mosaic and since I told people a couple years ago "You will know I sold out when I brew with Mosaic" (not a fan) I am considering calling it "I Sold Out!"  lol  Will probably go with "Chaos Ensues" though :) 

I was recently at a brewery and had a slightly hoppy alt with hints of clover and molasses. Best beer ive had in awhile. 

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Petit frere de Saison, fermented with the new SafAle BE-134 yeast while doubling the flaked rye

Chilean Coffee Stout using Patagonia specialty malts

Heather-Tipped Scottish Export with extra heather @ flame-out and different yeast

5-6 Gallon batch of Vienna Lager

Lighter, hoppier Calidelic Mandarin IPA

 

That should get me through November, haha. 🍻 

 

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Working on the details of my chocolate cherry stout, which will be brewed in about 3 weeks. Also need to get a nice malty ale going, perhaps a Vienna based ale..

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Sitting here this morning working on up-scaling my Winter Warmer IPA. I haven't brewed this one in about 5 years or so.  Kinda excited to do it again.  A place in town has said they will buy anything from us that is an IPA, so its time to start brewing a bunch of IPAs I guess and might as well start with an old classic. :)

Shiverrr.thumb.jpg.7e74be99bb16656e21110475510d5e9d.jpg

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I just revised my schedule.  The wife and I are going on vacation in a few weeks so I figured I'd get one last brew in before that.  When we return I'll lower the temp on the mini-fridge and switch to brewing the four lagers I have on hand.  Then it's back to ales.

 

-  Whispering Wheat Hefeweizen
-  Saazquatch Imperial Pilsner (lager)
-  Chromosbeer (lager)
-  Austin Pils (lager)
-  Armstrong Dortmunder Export (lager)
-  Black Moon Weizen
-  Sir Kenneth Blond Ale
-  CALEX#2

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On 10/24/2017 at 8:22 AM, kedogn said:

I am not sure about he Bavarian yeast... but my next beer that I'm brewing is going to be basically a hoppy amber, using a couple # of Mosaic.  It will be my first time using Mosaic and since I told people a couple years ago "You will know I sold out when I brew with Mosaic" (not a fan) I am considering calling it "I Sold Out!"  lol  Will probably go with "Chaos Ensues" though :) 

 

C03738B1-A50C-4F87-8118-C52A6CAB4DA8.png

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Planning on keeping a few specialty type grains on hand for various styles of brews. This is what i have so far. I have 4 containers that can each fit 6# of grain. Any suggestions? 

 

17E15E48-5B44-4D89-81AA-1C33692EFF41.png

 

Theyre out of Pale chocolate malt and the other one i wanted, breiss mild malt, they do not stock. 

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Been doing the lighter beers, the just beers, and IPA's until my basement beer fridge is packed full. Outside of that  an API-IPA, Thunder Bay IPA, Nilla Porter, and Oktoberfestivus, are all conditioning.  That Voodoo that You Do and a Sticky Wicket Stout are fermenting.

 

Just ordered a Lock, Stock, and Barrel Stout. 

 

Somebody stop me. :o

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On 10/19/2017 at 8:06 PM, Creeps McLane said:

I just bought 150+ lbs of grain, almost 2 lbs of hops, and 10 various yeasts. I'm ready for some fall / winter brewing baby! 

 

First brew, tomorrow will be a 10 gallon split batch. Last round of Pantry brews.

 

1 MRB northwest pale ale 

1 MRB Diablo IPA

1 MRB Churchills Nutbrown

1 Coopers pale ale

1 Breiss Sorghum 

4 oz rye malt

4 oz golden promise

4 oz white wheat

4 oz red wheat

3 oz mild malt

3 oz extra special malt

4 oz raw merit barley

1/2 oz warrior @ 10

1/2 oz warrior @ 5

1/2 oz warrior @ 0

1 packet of MGJ empire ale

1 mason jar of harvested lager yeast

Ive been drinking the ale version for awhile now. Quite nice actually. I skipped the nut brown addition. I forgot i used empire ale yeast on this one. I couldn’t tell by drinking it. It just tastes nice.  

 

Havent tried the lager yet, its lagering... actually i already had the ale on tap and i didnt want two similar beers so i threw in an AG amber instead. Im kinda switching back and forth between the two. The other taps are my chocolate stout and my rye saison. Theyre both ok. Who was I fooling making a chocolate stout? Im not a stout guy... 

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