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brybry

Stout or Porter what's the difference

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I've been doing some reading trying to figure out what the differences between a Porter and a Stout. Some say it's about color, others say the grains used and some say it's the ABV. Needless to say, I'm more confused that before. I know that from a Mr. Beer point of view both the Porter & Stout HME have the same amount of malt and therefore will have roughly the same ABV. So what is the difference in the Mr. Beer world, anyone?

 

 

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Porters are usually a bit lighter in body and sometimes color than stouts (they were derived from England's brown ales), though this may not always be true. One thing that does set them apart, however, is that porters will almost never have any roasted barley in them. They mostly use chocolate malt and black patent (aka black malt) exclusively. The ABV can vary between both porters and stouts so it's irrelavant. Stouts also tend to have more hops or a higher IBU than porters.

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

Porters are usually a bit lighter in body and sometimes color than stouts (they were derived from England's brown ales), though this may not always be true. One thing that does set them apart, however, is that porters will almost never have any roasted barley in them. They mostly use chocolate malt and black patent (aka black malt) exclusively. The ABV can vary between both porters and stouts so it's irrelavant. Stouts also tend to have more hops or a higher IBU than porters.

I know you won't give up the grain bill for the Porter vrs Stout HME's but would it be safe to say that Mr Beer follows the general guidelines that you outlined?

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55 minutes ago, brybry said:

I know you won't give up the grain bill for the Porter vrs Stout HME's but would it be safe to say that Mr Beer follows the general guidelines that you outlined?

 

Yes, this is true.

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1 hour ago, Jim Johnson said:

A stout was originally called a stout porter. So I guess it is a porter

yes I read that, also read that originally not all stouts were dark

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Angry Bovine Milk Stout uses Chocolate Malt, so is it a Porter?:blink:

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10 hours ago, Bhob said:

Angry Bovine Milk Stout uses Chocolate Malt, so is it a Porter?:blink:

 

Someone hasn't been paying attention... :P

 

No. It has roasted malt in it so it's not a porter. Porters use black malt and or chocolate malt. Stouts use ANY of the dark malts. PORTERS DO NOT USE ROASTED MALT.

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3 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

PORTERS DO NOT USE ROASTED MALT.

 

So basically, you're saying that porters do not use roasted malt?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B)

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From a malt producer's web page:

You probably don't munch on a handful of Roasted Barley the way you do sweet Caramel Malts. But those dry roasted bitter, coffee-like flavors characteristic of Roasted Barley are what make most Stouts a Stout, and add complex flavor or color to other brews as well. We produce two types of Roasted Barley for your brewing flexibility. Roasted Barley and Black Barley are not malted. Rather, they are made by intensely roasting barley that's been steeped. Roasted Barley and Black Barley will impact foam color. Black Malt will not.

 

#### OK then - how do I get my porter to smell and taste of coffee WITHOUT putting actual coffee in it??  Yuengling has don't that for their porter they use in Black and Tan. (But apparently not for their regular porter :-/) The B&T has a wonderful Mocha aroma and taste.

 

#### Also note the comment on FOAM COLOR.

 

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4 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Someone hasn't been paying attention... :P

 

No. It has roasted malt in it so it's not a porter. Porters use black malt and or chocolate malt. Stouts use ANY of the dark malts. PORTERS DO NOT USE ROASTED MALT.

exactly how do you get chocolate malt with out roasting it??

 

 

Chocolate malt is made in a similar manner as black malt. Dried pale malt is roasted at 420–450 °F (220–230 °C), just as black malt is, but for a shorter time — about 2 to 2.5 hours. (For comparison, in actual chocolate production, whole dried "cocoa beans" are roasted at a relatively mild 250–320 °F (120–160 °C) for 30–60 minutes. Coffee beans — used for brewing a different kind of dark beverage — are roasted at 375–425 °F (190–220 °C) for 90 seconds to 15 minutes.)

 
 
 
 
 
 

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17 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

exactly how do you get chocolate malt with out roasting it??

 

 

Chocolate malt is made in a similar manner as black malt. Dried pale malt is roasted at 420–450 °F (220–230 °C), just as black malt is, but for a shorter time — about 2 to 2.5 hours. (For comparison, in actual chocolate production, whole dried "cocoa beans" are roasted at a relatively mild 250–320 °F (120–160 °C) for 30–60 minutes. Coffee beans — used for brewing a different kind of dark beverage — are roasted at 375–425 °F (190–220 °C) for 90 seconds to 15 minutes.)

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

I'm not referring to Chocolate Malt, I'm referring to Roasted Malt. When you buy them from any vendor, they are different grains, regardless of the process used to make them. You should know this being a LHBS manager. Porters do not use Roasted Malt. It may use roasted malts such as chocolate, but not "Roasted Malt". Arguing about semantics in the conversation will only confuse people.

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And I thought chocolate malt just had chocolate in it. ?

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I mis-understood the comment...of course I know the difference between malted and just roasted.  Never had to resort to a roast to mit with in the specs

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Oh dear, my Mr B porter (with smooth and robust packs added for wonderful enjoyment) has a light brown foam.

Can this mean the dreaded roastsd malts are on there somewhere?

smooth porter2.png

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Nope. There is no Roasted Malt in the Mr. Beer Porter. Plenty of Black Malt and Chocolate Malt, though. You guys do realize Roasted Malt isn't the only dark malt, right?

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