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Bubbles

How should beer look when coming out of the fermenter?

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Should the beer be completely clear before bottling?

How exactly should it look, please give a detailed description of what is should look like.

 

thank you

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I also have a ton of this milky white substance at the bottom of my 2 gallon keg fermenter, is this normal?

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Bubbles:

 

Some tips:

 

1) STOP LOOKING.  Ferment for 21 days, then bottle.  There is no "detailed description", some batches are clear, some aren't so clear, some are hard to see through.  Given that the fermenter is brown, that makes it all the harder.

 

2) That substance is TRUB.  Dead yeast.  If you didn't have it, you would not have beer.  You want to bottle without disturbing that layer. 

 

Before you do your next batch, do some reading to better familiarize yourself with the process.

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John Palmer's book , how to brew is well worth the read,and there are many many web sites to research, plus this forum is a wealth of knowledge not to be passed up, I started brewing January 16th but before I even opened my kit I was online researching and reading on these forums, just brewed my #6 batch and I'm still reading and researching, trust what rick and the other members may tell you and you will do well, happy brewing and welcome to the forums

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2 hours ago, Bubbles said:

Should the beer be completely clear before bottling?

How exactly should it look, please give a detailed description of what is should look like.

 

thank you

 

Look at the links in RickBeer's post.  Read each of them, more than once if necessary, and you will gain a better understanding of brewing.  I started brewing a year ago January after getting a Mr. Beer kit for Christmas.  I've brewed about 20, 2-gallon batches last year and I have to thank the folks in here for all the knowledge they are so willing to pass on.  The color of your wort will depend on the type of beer you're brewing... lagers are fairly clear, wheat beers are cloudy, it all just depends on the beer you're brewing.  Like RickBeer said, the layer in the bottom is the "TRUB." Again, look at his link for Mr. Beer Glossary for definitions of terms you may not understand right off... it's a valuable tool.

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Do you chill your wort before pitching your yeast?  I no longer use the the Mr Beer keg for fermentation.  I brew 5 gallon batches.  I use a food grade plastic fermentation pail.  I chill my wort before pitching the yeast.  The chilling will stop any cooking and prevent further tannins being released.  I keep the wort in the fermentation pail for 5 to 7 days.  I then rack off the wort into a 5 gallon glass carboy for the balance of conditioning time.  I have found this process helps in the fining of the beer.  Make sure you use good sterilizing practices when using your airlocks.  SO, I buy double the product when brewing Mr. Beer recipes.

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I have 2 lbk's and a 6.5gl fermenter, I also double up recipes from Mr beer but that only gets me 4 1/4 gl batches,only 1 lbk is down ATM the other is full and the 6.5ver gotta cream ale brewing(5gl recipe)and the lbk got apple brown beery for the wife she drinks less than me so the lbk's are very convenient easy to store also,as far as racking to a secondary,I fail to see the need unless your shooting for clarity or batch priming,I don't do either at the moment I'm still conditioning in the bottle as prolly must of us here are,looking to step up to kegging real soon but prolly still won't secondary

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Oh,and you don't need to chill wort using the lbk when you top off with cold water your temp should be right where it needs to be

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Just a nod to all that was said before. However, I will say that the trub is NOT all dead yeast cells. There are many who "recover" viable yeast from trub to use again for another beer.

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