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Jaymunoz90

Making cider out of apple juice

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Just curious who's done it and how they went about it? I've been reading about it and know not to get apple juice with preservatives in it.

 

My plan is eventually to attempt a cherry cider using apple juice if anyone has any advice

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what he added before the yeast was yeast nutrient. were you planning on a still or sparkling cider?

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29 minutes ago, Jaymunoz90 said:

I've been reading about it and know not to get apple juice with preservatives in it.

 

I was going to throw together a hard cider and I realized in a hurry that buying organic (no preservatives) apple juice was going to cost way more than LME would cost for the same amount of final product. I'll stick with good ol' beer! :)

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you can buy store brand, I used Piggly Wiggly 100% pure apple juice. as long as there are no big words in the ingredients...

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The better the source and blend of apples the better the cider. Yer gets what yer pays for...Better cider has more tannin  and more acidity and more sugar (from the apples) than juice that is made for drinking sweet and unfermented... AND... allowing cider to age 9 months to a year encourages the malic acid from the apples to transform into lactic acid (malic is sharper than lactic) and the flavor of cider just improves by magnitudes after about 9 months aging - also, although brewers tend to use Nottingham and Safale US -05 to ferment cider, 71B a wine yeast has an affinity for malic acid and it smooths its edges in a very delicious way...

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A gallon of good apple juice, 2 cups of powdered sugar and yeast? That's it? Summer is coming, it's time to try this

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I don't know about using volume to measure sugar.. 1 lb of sugar to make a gallon of liquid raises gravity of the liquid by 40 points. Quality apple juice is likely to have a gravity of about 1.050 so an additional pound per gallon will give you a gravity of 1.090.. and a gravity of 1.090 (a good starting gravity for most wines) will give you a potential ABV of close to 12 %. In other words, not something you want to drink by the pint... BUT straight apple juice IF it is around 1.050 will still give you a potential gravity of about 6.5%... , a cider, not a wine... and something that you COULD drink by the pint... But it has  about twice the alcohol of a session beer...

That said, rather than add table sugar to apple juice to boost its alcohol content you might want to freeze the juice and collect the frozen juice as it thaws. The first 1/3 of the juice that runs liquid will contain about half the total sugar content and about half the flavor so you will have concentrated the flavor and the sugar without boiling off any liquid (and so you won't have set any pectins).. That would give you a potential ABV of about 13% . Of course you will "lose" about 2/3 of the total juice... but yer gets what yer pays for... and that concentration highlights the flavor of the apples..

What you also may want to do before you pitch any yeast is add pectic enzyme to break down the pectins and so result in a bright and clear cder... My guess is that whassisname's apple wine will be cloudy and hazy... Doesn't spoil the flavor but why aim for seconds when you can aim higher?

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1 hour ago, Jim Johnson said:

what he added before the yeast was yeast nutrient. were you planning on a still or sparkling cider?

I was planning on making a sparkling cider.

 

49 minutes ago, Brewer said:

The better the source and blend of apples the better the cider. Yer gets what yer pays for...Better cider has more tannin  and more acidity and more sugar (from the apples) than juice that is made for drinking sweet and unfermented... AND... allowing cider to age 9 months to a year encourages the malic acid from the apples to transform into lactic acid (malic is sharper than lactic) and the flavor of cider just improves by magnitudes after about 9 months aging - also, although brewers tend to use Nottingham and Safale US -05 to ferment cider, 71B a wine yeast has an affinity for malic acid and it smooths its edges in a very delicious way...

So since I'm planning making a cherry cider can I just add cherry juice with the apple juice, add some sugar, give it a good shaking to aerate it, pitch the yeast and be done?

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I agree with RickBeer. You need to aerate beer because when you boil the wort you blow off all the oxygen in the water. With apple juice you are not applying any heat so the oxygen in the juice will not be evaporated off. However, Yeast consume all the O2 in a must VERY quickly and when making wine or cider I aerate a couple of times a day - by vigorous stirring. The stirring not only incorporates air into the fermenting must (a no-no in brewing?) but that same stirring removes CO2. Carbon Dioxide inhibits fermentation (and increases the acidity and excessive acidity stresses yeast) so this stirring has the effect of "degassing" the cider and aerating the fermenting liquor. This reduces stress on the yeast (and so reduces the likelihood of the yeast producing hydrogen sulfide - what some brewers call "rhino farts",  and argue that rhino farts are to be expected -  Well, wine makers don't expect hydrogen sulfide in their wines.

 

To decrease the probability of the yeast being stressed enough to produce that gas (and worse - mercaptains (smells like burnt matches)- which are much more difficult to remove) you want to make sure the must has all the nutrients the yeast need - so you can add raisins (about 3 or 4 oz to a gallon ) or you can add DAP. (mead makers add 1/3 the total amount of DAP they intend to add just after the fermentation visibly begins to take off, 1/3 after the gravity has dropped by half (so if your starting gravity was 1.050 you add the second batch around 1.025 and the last 1/3 when gravity drops to about 1.010. (and yes! cider makers and wine makers are not afraid to use an hydrometer and as long as their sanitation practices are good , not afraid to return the sample to the fermenter.

 

As to adding sugar... Your call, of course... but why would you increase the amount of alcohol. Cider and wine... (and I would argue , beer) are all about balance - the balance of the richness of the flavor to alcohol level to the sweetness to acidic kick to tannins (mouth drying /puckering effect). Unnecessarily adding sugar (or adding sugar without a really solid understanding of how that will shift the balance) does not always make for a better cider... Just sayin'

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11 hours ago, Brewer said:

I agree with RickBeer. You need to aerate beer because when you boil the wort you blow off all the oxygen in the water. With apple juice you are not applying any heat so the oxygen in the juice will not be evaporated off. However, Yeast consume all the O2 in a must VERY quickly and when making wine or cider I aerate a couple of times a day - by vigorous stirring. The stirring not only incorporates air into the fermenting must (a no-no in brewing?) but that same stirring removes CO2. Carbon Dioxide inhibits fermentation (and increases the acidity and excessive acidity stresses yeast) so this stirring has the effect of "degassing" the cider and aerating the fermenting liquor. This reduces stress on the yeast (and so reduces the likelihood of the yeast producing hydrogen sulfide - what some brewers call "rhino farts",  and argue that rhino farts are to be expected -  Well, wine makers don't expect hydrogen sulfide in their wines.

 

To decrease the probability of the yeast being stressed enough to produce that gas (and worse - mercaptains (smells like burnt matches)- which are much more difficult to remove) you want to make sure the must has all the nutrients the yeast need - so you can add raisins (about 3 or 4 oz to a gallon ) or you can add DAP. (mead makers add 1/3 the total amount of DAP they intend to add just after the fermentation visibly begins to take off, 1/3 after the gravity has dropped by half (so if your starting gravity was 1.050 you add the second batch around 1.025 and the last 1/3 when gravity drops to about 1.010. (and yes! cider makers and wine makers are not afraid to use an hydrometer and as long as their sanitation practices are good , not afraid to return the sample to the fermenter.

 

As to adding sugar... Your call, of course... but why would you increase the amount of alcohol. Cider and wine... (and I would argue , beer) are all about balance - the balance of the richness of the flavor to alcohol level to the sweetness to acidic kick to tannins (mouth drying /puckering effect). Unnecessarily adding sugar (or adding sugar without a really solid understanding of how that will shift the balance) does not always make for a better cider... Just sayin'

The cider I grew up with you didn't drink by the pint either. Not if you had to drive home anyway. ; )

 

It wasn't about aeration it was about mixing the sugar in. Not really any different than me using the whip on a cordless drill to stir when I do wines or cider.

 

Raisins not needed, he added yeast nutrient just before the yeast  

 

I did it his way,(I even shook it instead of breaking out the drill) I made mine still, so when I racked it off the yeast for the last time I added a quart of A. J. to back sweeten, it was good. Though perhaps, a bit to sweet. Going to try adding just a pint next time

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On ‎3‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 8:07 PM, Jim Johnson said:

you can buy store brand, I used Piggly Wiggly 100% pure apple juice. as long as there are no big words in the ingredients...

My dad told me that Piggly Wiggly is one of the last oldest groceries in the business. He's almost 90, and when he was around 7 yrs old that store was abundant! there were a few here in my town two yrs ago but now they're gone

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On 3/11/2016 at 9:07 PM, Jaymunoz90 said:

I was planning on making a sparkling cider.

 

So since I'm planning making a cherry cider can I just add cherry juice with the apple juice, add some sugar, give it a good shaking to aerate it, pitch the yeast and be done?

 

I've done the apple/cherry cider before.  From what I can remember, little to no cherry flavor made it through the fermentation.  I read somewhere that you can flavor it with kool-aid packets, but haven't tried it.  

 

I've also made cider with a pound of dme added to it and beer yeast instead of wine yeast to try and make it a little sweeter.  This was years ago when I was experimenting and making more than I am now.

 

One bottle of just plain apple cider, I put in some cinnamon and it turned out great.

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