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Cidery

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So my second attempt is pretty good but I can taste room for improvement. My Aztec Mexican cervezas has been conditioning for 5 weeks. It's pretty good but has a little more  cidery taste than desired. From what I'm reading, too much sugar at bottling can cause this. I'm using the recommend two tablets per 750 ml bottle. Not much head, but good carbo. How do I remedy this slight cidery taste.

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From what I'm reading may be fermentation temps were too high. 68,70 for duration

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Strange though. Been sampling a couple bottles a week for last three weeks and these last 2 were the only ones I noticed it in. Still wonder if they were the bottom of the barrel bottles. Maybe i ll keep track of bottles on next batch.

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Hello!

 

Bottling sugar would not cause the cidery taste. 

 

Did you use booster for this one? Did you add sugar during the brewing?

 

And 68/70 is not really too high. Or it shouldn't be. Was that the room temp or the temp of the wort?

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9 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

And 68/70 is not really too high. Or it shouldn't be. Was that the room temp or the temp of the wort?

 Yeah...it seems like that should be fine for most yeasts. Might be nice to keep the ambient below 68 so the wort will peak around 70.

I think the biggest issuess come from inexperienced brewers reading the directions and heating the fermenter up to keep it at that 76 degree range. Keeping ambient at mid 70's or using a heating pad will probably push the wort into the 80 degree range.

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You are correct.   I set my heating pad to 72 degrees thinking I was perfect since 72 falls right in the middle of the 68 - 76 degree recommended range.   Then my beer developed a cider taste.  I'm hoping the 4 weeks of conditioning at around 71 degrees will at least greatly reduce that off flavor.   I'll know this Wednesday when I get a chance to taste it. 

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No booster. No additional sugar. I would say 68 to 72 room temp the whole time. Still haven't got a gauge for my wort. No heating or cooling. Just tried to keep the room at that temp range. But it was only 2 bottles out of 8  that it was noticable. Reading the forums it appears nthat this is a pretty common theme.

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Yep - JA nailed it in his response. I would think that the temperature during fermentation was too high, which produced the cider like flavor. I've been fermenting low -mid 60's (ambient room temperature) and the beers have been great. IMHO, MB should lower the upper range that they put in the instructions, since most people would regard that as room temperature, not the temperature of the wort during active fermentation. 

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4 hours ago, VictoryRider said:

I'm hoping the 4 weeks of conditioning at around 71 degrees will at least greatly reduce that off flavor.

I've found that the worst offenders in my batches have mellowed, but there are still flavors/harshness that I find very un-beerlike. Oh, wait...wait...un-BEERABLE.:D:D

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Once in a while $hit happens and we miss replacing an ice bottle. I missed a couple of batches out of town last year for a week.

 

Tried to phone home and tell some one what to do bot found one of my chilled water gallon jugs in the cooler instead of ice bottles.

When the beer develops off flavors from over temp it will never go away, I drank them but used as mixers for the most part.

 

When the beer develops off flavors from adjunct like sugar or LME boost it will condition out over time. Hopping the recipe in advance reduces this phenomena.

 

Cheers, M

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4 minutes ago, MnMBeer said:

Once in a while $hit happens and we miss replacing an ice bottle. I missed a couple of batches out of town last year for a week.

 

Tried to phone home and tell some one what to do bot found one of my chilled water gallon jugs in the cooler instead of ice bottles.

When the beer develops off flavors from over temp it will never go away, I drank them but used as mixers for the most part.

 

When the beer develops off flavors from adjunct like sugar or LME boost it will condition out over time. Hopping the recipe in advance reduces this phenomena.

 

Cheers, M

Sometimes you leave your yeast in a hot car for days. And then use it cuz it's your second batch and you're and idiot. That idiot may still have about 6 liter bottles left of that. God I need to dump that

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So far all the brews I've done have been between 64 & 67 degree room temp

On 3/12/2016 at 6:36 PM, Brian N. said:

Yep - JA nailed it in his response. I would think that the temperature during fermentation was too high, which produced the cider like flavor. I've been fermenting low -mid 60's (ambient room temperature) and the beers have been great. IMHO, MB should lower the upper range that they put in the instructions, since most people would regard that as room temperature, not the temperature of the wort during active fermentation. 

My beer has also turned out very well

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25 minutes ago, MnMBeer said:

When the beer develops off flavors from adjunct like sugar or LME boost it will condition out over time.

I'm leaving about half the honey-ingredient beers to age for a while. I'll try them again in another month or so.

Meanwhile, most have quieted down pretty reasonably and while they're still not anything to write home about, you wouldn't kick then out of bed for eating crackers...because they're beers and they don't eat crackers...and because you can totally drink beer in bed...with crackers if you have any...but, if you're like me, you'll probably get kicked out. 

:D

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Beers heavy on the malt and adjuncts do well with extended conditioning. I've been drinking beers that have been conditioning for months, and never have I noticed that they have deteriorated, they have been, well, great. I'm down to my last couple of bottles of Irish stout, that I bottled in November and it has become my favorite. 

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 If I were to start adding frozen bottles to my plastic tote I keep the lbk's in, would it have to be done from the start to do any good. I'm a week in on two batches. Basically I have a plastic storage tote just large enough to hold my lbk's. So what's an effective method. Just keeping a couple frozen water bottles on the sides? And this is for fermentation only correct, not used in conditioning? Also it seems like this would have the temp constantly varying. Isn't that worse?

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No when it's in the bottle the temp don't seem to matter that much. Living in GA the temp in the Man Cave in the summer is in the low 80s got no way to temp control that much ale.

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Do some reading, this is discussed often.

 

After the first week, heat produced is less so less frozen water bottles are needed.  Goal of 65 degree wort temps.

 

Conditioning is in bottles, not the LBK, and should be 70 or higher.

 

And answered here - 

 

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18 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Do some reading, this is discussed often.

 

After the first week, heat produced is less so less frozen water bottles are needed.  Goal of 65 degree wort temps.

 

Conditioning is in bottles, not the LBK, and should be 70 or higher.

 

And answered here - 

 

 

If I could set a timer and ambient temp control on a brewing cabinet/area for standard US ale yeast brews (pitching at 68-70 degrees) it would be 1 week at 62 rising to 65 by day 5 or so, 2 weeks at 67 and then a separate conditioning cabinet at 72 all the time.

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My fermenting freezer keeps the wort at 65 for the entire time. For nearly all brews that works great.

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I'd recommend you read the posts where people very successfully use a cooler and frozen water bottles, often rotating them every 12 hours for the first week, then less often after that.

 

If you have a spare fridge or freezer, a temp controller is an under $50 (even closer to $30 if you build it) investment.  

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

My fermenting freezer keeps the wort at 65 for the entire time. For nearly all brews that works great.

 

I was given a little chest freezer..perfect size for 2 or 3 LBK's or my bucket primary and one or two. Just have to rig a controller. I can probably sneak in one more room-temp primary in the bucket and I can still stack some LBKs in my cabinet, but I'll be limited to probably mid-60s ambient in there. Time to gear up for hot-weather brewing! <_<

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I was researching the wort temp controllers and as luck would have it we need a new refrigerator. The old one will work perfectly in the garage for my brewing endeavors.

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Sometimes we luck out like that.  I borrowed/stole/took my in-law's garage freezer when they moved to Assisted Living...

 

Also, if someone's frig/freezer won't hold a temp, BUT it does work, often the temp controller can be used to override the bad thermostat.  

 

I made mine for $30 including a paint can heater, but I rarely use that since the freezer is inside.  Only when the brew first starts to kick it in to gear.

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