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Chuck N ™

A Question For The "Trust"

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So my last couple of batches of my brown ale have come out flat. I finally blamed it on the dextrose I had been using thinking it had gone past it's expiration point. My last batch I batch primed with straight table sugar. I have been having good luck with it with all my other batches. And then my most recent batch of brown ale came out flat again. I was frustrated to the point of possibly scrapping out the recipe and trying something new.

But tonight I'm brewing up a batch of pale ale and decided I'd have one of the browns. (They're not so bad that I'm going to dump them and I'm drinking them slowly but surely). This one had so much carbonation that it came out of the glass.  I thought, "Oh, oh. I have an infection." But it tastes delicious!

So I can't think of why, if I'm batch priming, one bottle - maybe more - is well carbonated while the others are under carbonated.

What say the forum?

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well, lets get the obvious out of the way first.  Number 1 - Your batch priming solution isnt mixed as well as you think.  If you disagree, lets move on to number two.

 

Number two, your yeast is dead at bottling.  Unlikely, so Id point back to number one, which seems like the most likely.

 

Youre certainly no noob to the game so your guess is as good as mine.  Over flowing upon opening has only meant infection to me.  Maybe you created a good tasting infected beer? Ill still point to number one. I really dont see any other possibility.

 

As far as the previous ones that didnt carb up, it can only be your yeast right?  I mean that how you carb your beer.  I dont think sugar goes bad.  That or your condition temps arent as high as you think they are.  I dont know, Im just trying to talk this through with you.  Ive been up for 21 hours, hitting my limit for sure.  Cheers my Schwartzbier and I bid you a good night

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 Your no. 1 is my first suspect as well. I might be a little too cautious when mixing in the solution while trying not to oxidize the beer.

This last beer gave me hope for the beer in the future.  And hope is a wonderful thing.

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1) PET caps need replacing?

 

2) Mixing - solution in first, then beer which mixes it, then gentle stir, and repeat every 8 bottles.

 

3) Senility?

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yeah askin the same of what the tiny tree guy asked, glass or pet bottles? I only used the pet bottles one time and moved on, I had some issues with the flip top too, I try to use the "more" rubber seals and not buy the synthetic seals, they only last about 2 batches, and the flip top brackets can be cheap too. but since I've been re using store bought bottle I and capping them, I've yet to run across any flat beer issues

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plus when I cap the bottles, I load them into a paint shaker and shake the daylights out of them for 10 minutes, i'm joking...........

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I just did a couple of batch-primes. I'll be interested in seeing how they turn out.

Seems like once the sugar is in solution and stirred in it should stay put. Maybe it could settle out, I suppose, but I'd be more concerned if it was dry priming sugar (BTW...I might be wrong, but I don't see how it could expire).

If you cold crashed a long time, I'd suspect yeast population density (it's hard to kill yeast...I froze 2 batches - 30 degrees, ice crystals - and proofed yeast from the trub...fermented like crazy). There would still be yeast in the beer, but if by far most of it settled out, it might take quite a bit of time to use up the priming sugar and create carb. 

I'd be more inclined to suspect the seal on the bottles, but that's a lot of bottles to be consistently bad.

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Possibly your priming solution is not mixed well.  I start racking my beers to my bottling bucket and make sure I have enough hose to have the beer move around the bottling bucket.  Once I get about 1/4 of the beer transferred, I pour in 1/3 of my priming solution, the same at 1/2 and the remaining 1/3 at 3/4.  Then when I am done, I give it a gentle stir to make sure it is all mixed well.

 

One other thing that hasn't been questioned.  What temperature are you carbonating at?  Make sure you are around 70, too cold and you won't get the carbonation you are looking for.  I have to add heat to mine year around in my basement to get them up to or slightly above 70 degrees.

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