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I've developed a pretty good process for baking off alcohol to make NA craft brews.  Unfortunately, lots of the hop character gets driven off as well. 

I am going to start a new Northwest Pale Ale batch, bake off the alcohol and add stewed Liberty hops to the post cooled batch before bottling.

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I'd suggest you do more research.  First, doing this to a Mr. Beer HME is simply a waste of money.  It's pre-hopped, and you're baking off the hop flavor.  Further, the NW Pale Ale is more hoppy than malty, so if you were going to do this it would be one of the worst ones to pick.  Burning off the alcohol makes all the hops come through much stronger.  

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Surprisingly, the hop flavor gets diluted.  I tried four packages of Liberty hops in the brew step and it smelled like grass when it was fermenting, but just about all of the flavor disappeared and most of the hop bite by the time the stuff got baked and bottled.

I bake at 170 - 180 (with a baking thermometer to measure) which is supposed to be the alcohol boiling point. 

I had done a bunch of NA beer creation research before starting.  The key warning seems to be avoid actual boiling of the beer.  This is why I bake in the oven rather than heat over a top burner.

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The best way to do this is to hook a vacuum pump to a pressure cooker so you can remove the alcohol at a much lower temp, and preserve some of the hop flavor and aroma. This is called "vacuum distillation".

 

Another method is to use reverse osmosis. Only alcohol and water (and volatile acids) will filter through, leaving behind a syrupy concentrate of NA beer. Then the alcohol is distilled off the water, and the water (with the volatile acids still within) is returned to the beer "concentrate".

 

Also, even if you drive off hop flavors/aromas, you can still dry-hop after the alcohol is removed to return some hop flavor to the beer. The best way to do this is to dry-hop in the keg (assuming you're kegging your beer, because you will probably have to if making NA beer). 
 

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If you want to make non-alcoholic beer beverage, you should leave the country.  This is America, proud land of the free and the drunk.  We pride ourselves on drinking too much and saying objectionable things.  :lol:

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

If you want to make non-alcoholic beer beverage, you should leave the country.  This is America, proud land of the free and the drunk.  We pride ourselves on drinking too much and saying objectionable things.  :lol:

Mr. Trump, politics are not to be discussed on this forum for fear of the ban-hammer!  ;)

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9 hours ago, RickBeer said:

If you want to make non-alcoholic beer beverage, you should leave the country.  This is America, proud land of the free and the drunk.  We pride ourselves on drinking too much and saying objectionable things.  :lol:

It's also the land of piss-poor beer. I will be happy to leave and go to a land of full-bodied ales.  My passport just got renewed.

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14 hours ago, jim_NA said:

It's also the land of piss-poor beer. I will be happy to leave and go to a land of full-bodied ales.  My passport just got renewed.

 

This IS the land of full-bodied ales. The US has more breweries than almost every country on the planet COMBINED. ;)

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15 hours ago, jim_NA said:

It's also the land of piss-poor beer. I will be happy to leave and go to a land of full-bodied ales.  My passport just got renewed.

If you can't find some full-bodied ales here in the US, then, sir, I must inform you that you are simply not trying!

;)

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

This IS the land of full-bodied ales. The US has more breweries than almost every country on the planet COMBINED. ;)

I didn't noe that? and I thot Uganda had the most breweries?? wow u learn sumthing everyday!!

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6 hours ago, MichaelL said:

If you can't find some full-bodied ales here in the US, then, sir, I must inform you that you are simply not trying!

;)

Well, they have gotten better over the years.  I'm just not willing to pay 2-3 times the average price of beer to hunt very hard.

I am still recovering from and trying to replicate the shock of tasting a Double Diamond for the first time on a British Airways flight (decades ago).

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I was thinking about this because my wife is now pregnant, and she likes Cooper's Mexican, and found the temp to boil off alcohol is slightly less than 174. 

But, a thought: if I make it like the normal Mexican and just use far less yeast, say about 2 grams, then maybe freeze the LBK after a few days to kill the yeast, could I then bottle with the same amount of sugar to carbonate and have it come out at about 1% or less?  Or would the beer be flat?  Or just not freeze it because 2 grams of yeast would only make 1% anyway?

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1 minute ago, Bopper09 said:

I was thinking about this because my wife is now pregnant, and she likes Cooper's Mexican, and found the temp to boil off alcohol is slightly less than 174. 

But, a thought: if I make it like the normal Mexican and just use far less yeast, say about 2 grams, then maybe freeze the LBK after a few days to kill the yeast, could I then bottle with the same amount of sugar to carbonate and have it come out at about 1% or less?  Or would the beer be flat?  Or just not freeze it because 2 grams of yeast would only make 1% anyway?

I would just worry about damaging the LBK during the freeze, but that's a question for the boys at Mr. Beer.

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1 hour ago, AnthonyC said:

I would just worry about damaging the LBK during the freeze, but that's a question for the boys at Mr. Beer.

I doubt it with the top off, and I've put in a stainless tap, so.... without regard for keg damage, if that would work fine and still bottle carbonate?  Or would I need more yeast to carbonate?

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17 minutes ago, Bopper09 said:

I doubt it with the top off, and I've put in a stainless tap, so.... without regard for keg damage, if that would work fine and still bottle carbonate?  Or would I need more yeast to carbonate?

I was concerned about the plastic becoming brittle when frozen.  As far as your yeast question, I honestly don't know.  I'm sure someone will come along and help you out.  Good luck! ?

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9 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

I was concerned about the plastic becoming brittle when frozen.  As far as your yeast question, I honestly don't know.  I'm sure someone will come along and help you out.  Good luck! ?

Ah, yes.  I guess I could use another container.  But the question is would freezing to kill the yeast be better than boiling off the alcohol, and therefore flavor?

 

I think I may just try with little to no yeast, to see if I can get a .7 or 1%, but could always just add the rest of the yeast to bring to normal and just drink it myself.

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Using less yeast will accomplish only one thing - it may stress the yeast producing off flavors (Mr. Beer used to provide a much smaller yeast packet).  So no, that's not your solution.

 

The other flaw in your logic is IF in fact you kill off the yeast by some method, you can't carbonate with the normal process of adding sugar.  That process involves the yeast eating the sugar which produces the carbonation.  So, if you killed the yeast, you'd have no carbonation...

 

The process described to create a NA beer I believe involves making beer the normal way, THEN baking off the alcohol, then kegging (as the baking kills the yeast also).

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Truthfully I've never detected the obscene flavor difference some NA attempters have claimed.

 

The first couple of batches I tried, I only did about six bottles of NA and just straight bottled the rest.  I really couldn't tell a noticeable (let alone despicable) taste difference.


I bake the beer, rather than boil it, so I don't get the roiling introduction of fresh oxygen which has supposedly caused cardboardy tastes.  I also have never gotten the super bitterness other folks have claimed.

 

I preheat the oven to 350, load the oven with ceramic baking dishes of fully fermented beer, and monitor the temperature until the beer reaches 180.  Then, I turn down the oven to 180 for a half hour.  Then, I chill the beer down to about 80 before re-adding it to the fermenter, on top of the trub.   As little as a half bottle of beer in the keg appears to be enough to re-yeast the NA beer in time for priming.


 

 

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20 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Using less yeast will accomplish only one thing - it may stress the yeast producing off flavors (Mr. Beer used to provide a much smaller yeast packet).  So no, that's not your solution.

 

The other flaw in your logic is IF in fact you kill off the yeast by some method, you can't carbonate with the normal process of adding sugar.  That process involves the yeast eating the sugar which produces the carbonation.  So, if you killed the yeast, you'd have no carbonation...

 

The process described to create a NA beer I believe involves making beer the normal way, THEN baking off the alcohol, then kegging (as the baking kills the yeast also).

Makes sense.  Thanks.  I was thinking that with the mrbeer kits they only come with 4 grams of yeast when I usually use 7 gram packs with the coopers, and has less alcohol, but just threw a thought out there.  Read a bit where freezing it after normal ferment (in a couple larger plastic bottles) upside down before bottling, the alcohol will not freeze and run to the bottom, bleed out (without exploding cap off) bottom and boil only that part at 174 for 20 mins-1/2 hr and pour the rest back into wort part.  Supposed to keep flavor better than boiling it all.  But I suppose if I bottle with sugar to carbonate, it would take more yeast and ultimately make more alcohol level.  But I'm hoping it would still only be around 1% by doing that.

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The amount of alcohol generated by carbonating in the bottle is very minimal.

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