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BrewBert

Bottling Using LBK Spigot

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Hey All,

 

So my second batch is fermenting right now, but I want to be all ready when bottling comes around. 

 

Question for you guys:

Do most of you just bottle straight out of the LBK using the spigot with a wand or do a lot of people use a separate bottling bucket/siphon etc? 

 

My fear is that the sediment will flow out if just using the spigot on the LBK, which happened to me on my first batch. If a wand solves this issue, I plan on picking one up before bottling anyways.

 

I guess overall....I'm just looking for the best way to reduce sediment in the bottles. 

 

Any input would be great! 

 

Thanks,

BrewBert

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The best way to reduce sediment is to cold-crash your LBK in the fridge for 24-48 hours with the front slightly propped up. The cold causes the sediment to compact very tightly on the bottom of the LBK. This will also clarify your beer. With that said, you will still have sediment in the bottles from the carbonation process. This is completely normal and cannot be avoided. But if you refrigerate the beer for a few days before drinking, and swiftly pour it into a glass, you will leave the sediment behind.

 

Welcome to the community, by the way! :D

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Cold crash for 2 days and elevate the front of the LBK a little.  This will prevent a lot of the trub from getting into your bottle.  I bottle right from the LBK, just make sure you sanitize any part of the spigot that enters into the neck of the bottle.  Good luck!  :)

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I'm new to this whole process as well.  I've bottled 3 different batches so far and read a lot of the forums before bottling.  I was going to just use the LBK spigot, but read that it was going to save me time and reduce some of the sediment.  I'm sure a few of the veterans will comment and give you some good guidance, but all I can say is using a bottling wand IS A MUST! You don't have to keep twisting the spigot off and on for each bottle.  As far as sediment, you could try cold crashing the beer for a few days before bottling.  Just search "cold crashing" in the forum search or look at RickBeer's signature for the link to a good read.  When you move the LBK to get ready for bottling, you could be stirring up some of the sediment, which could get in your bottles.  Let it sit for awhile to let things settle before bottling.

 

Welcome to a fun hobby! :)

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You guys are awesome! So basically.....cold-crash and get a wand and just using the LBK should be the right way to go. Thanks for commenting back. I've got a second LBK and beer kit coming today, so I will have two IPA batches (diablo & long play) that I am pretty excited about! 

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28 minutes ago, BrewBert said:

You guys are awesome! So basically.....cold-crash and get a wand and just using the LBK PROPPED UP should be the right way to go. Thanks for commenting back. I've got a second LBK and beer kit coming today, so I will have two IPA batches (diablo & long play) that I am pretty excited about! 

 

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26 minutes ago, BrewBert said:

You guys are awesome! So basically.....cold-crash and get a wand and just using the LBK should be the right way to go. Thanks for commenting back. I've got a second LBK and beer kit coming today, so I will have two IPA batches (diablo & long play) that I am pretty excited about! 

 

Correct. Bottling with a wand directly from the LBK will reduce the chance of oxidation. By bottling without a wand, or by moving it to another container, you risk oxidizing your beer. While it may not matter if you're only conditioning it for a couple of weeks, this can be a problem for beers with extended conditioning times as the negative effects of oxidation may not show itself until much later.

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41 minutes ago, BrewBert said:

Bach's Brews is awesome! So basically.....cold-crash and get a wand and just using the LBK PROPPED UP should be the right way to go. Thanks for commenting back. I've got a second LBK and beer kit coming today, so I will have two IPA batches (diablo & long play) that I am pretty excited about! 

 

Well, thank you BrewBert.  So kind.  :wub: 

 

Lol.

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8 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Correct. Bottling with a wand directly from the LBK will reduce the chance of oxidation. By bottling without a wand, or by moving it to another container, you risk oxidizing your beer. While it may not matter if you're only conditioning it for a couple of weeks, this can be a problem for beers with extended conditioning times as the negative effects of oxidation may not show itself until much later.

I am not sure I had oxidized beer although I bottle direct without the wand. Not sure I would recognize it. But I found this article, that gives a nice way to experience it.   http://www.professorbeer.com/articles/oxidative_staling_beer.html

 

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I bottled my first batch without the wand because my kit was so old the wand didn't attach to the spigot. I tipped the bottle to keep agitation down and had no problems.

 

When I bottled my cider, found out my wand leaks. I had to put a tray on the floor to collect the dripping. Wasn't awful, just a bit irritating. I rinsed it out well and worked the foot valve trying get it to stop. Not bad enough to warrant turning the valve on and off. 

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well since my wand can't cast spells like I thot it described on mr. beer website, I just use it for bottling beer now, and works great!!

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So one more question to throw in....I'll be using cane sugar for bottling. Do you usually go with batch priming or priming each bottle individually?

 

From reading I had planned to batch prime and just put the sugar in the LBK, but again I'm slightly worried that it would stir up the sediment. Would cold-crashing take care of that to a point, as long as I don't go crazy with stirring the primer in?

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You need to read more. Batch priming is not just putting sugar in the LBK.  You need to dissolve the sugar in water, boil for a very short period, cool, and use a bottling bucket, 2nd LBK, or similar to add it and your beer to.   NEVER STIR THE LBK BEFORE BOTTLING.

 

New brewers should bottle prime, not batch prime.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

You need to read more. Batch priming is not just putting sugar in the LBK.  You need to dissolve the sugar in water, boil for a very short period, cool, and use a bottling bucket, 2nd LBK, or similar to add it and your beer to.   NEVER STIR THE LBK BEFORE BOTTLING.

 

New brewers should bottle prime, not batch prime.

RickBeer.......sorry I was just being brief. I knew that you dissolved the sugar in a little bit of water to begin with and let it cool before you added it to a bucket/LBK/other sanitized collection device. 

 

I just wasn't sure if anyone does batch brewing in their LBK. Figured I'd ask to get a perspective from you guys.

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2 hours ago, BrewBert said:

I just wasn't sure if anyone does batch brewing in their LBK. Figured I'd ask to get a perspective from you guys.

 

If you have more than one LBK it makes a handy way to batch prime. Using a sanitized LBK as a batch-priming vessel is a great idea. Just be sure you have a transfer tube to get from the primary LBK to the bottling LBK with no oxidation. What most folks do is start the flow and then add the cooled priming solution to the bottling vessel and let it swirl to mix. If you're careful about getting the last of the beer out of the primary without too much sediment, you'll keep the beer going in to the bottling vessel nice and clear. Whatever small amount of sediment gets through in the last of the transfer isn't concentrated in the last bottle of beer the way it would be when you bottle prime. 

You really have to be mindful about sanitation and clean,bubble-free transfer. And by the way, no matter how you do it, when you re-use your LBK for anything, remove and fully disassemble the spigot for cleaning (trap handle out of the body of the spigot). It'll get gunked up with old beer and sour your subsequent batch...been there done that.

As Rick says, do a batch or three with bottle priming to get the routine worked out and then bring in the batch priming process. You'll like it, but you have to get everything right for it to be an advantage over bottle priming.

Good luck!;)

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4 hours ago, BrewBert said:

I just wasn't sure if anyone does batch brewing in their LBK. Figured I'd ask to get a perspective from you guys.

 

No, this will not work at all because you have to stir the sugar in or you won't get even carbonation. And if you stir the sugar in, you will also stir up the sediment, which is a HUGE no-no in brewing. Our kegs were designed with the recessed floor to collect the sediment and keep it there so it doesn't come out through the spigot. Batch priming always involves moving the beer to another container, then moving it to bottles. All of this movement promotes oxidation. There's absolutely no reason to batch prime a 2 gallon batch of beer when bottle priming it is much easier and less risky. 

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One thing I would like to clarify, is that batch priming is a great method if you're brewing 5+ gallons. But for a 2 gallon batch, there is a higher chance of oxidation due to the smaller volume of liquid so it's really not recommended. Again, you may not taste the effects of oxidation right away, and if it's a beer that doesn't really need much conditioning, such as an IPA or wheat beer, you most likely won't notice any oxidation. But beers that need to be conditioned for a period of time may begin to develop a stale wet cardboard flavor over time as the dissolved oxygen in solution begins damaging the beer. Warmer conditioning temperatures will hasten this.

 

So for 2 gallons, it's always best to bottle prime, even if you aren't conditioning for a long time, just to be on the safe side. Besides, it's slightly less than a case of beer to bottle. It's not that laborious.

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