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timing issue

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I have Josh's Magic Hat #9 clone recipe (American Ale+Smooth LME+Cascade hops, S-04 yeast) that has been fermenting for 19 days now.  Normally I would let it go for 21 days, then cold-crash for 3 days.  Problem is, I am heading to the beach tomorrow (day 20) for 5 days (back home late Wednesday).

 

So would it be better to start the cold-crashing tomorrow and have it in the fridge for 5 days before bottling, or let stay fermenting in my cool (a steady 68 degrees ambient) basement until I could start the cold-crashing Thursday (which would make it 25 days fermenting)?

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Leave it in the basement for the 25 day ferment, then cold-crash. Leaving it in the fridge for too long can promote infection because the protective Co2 cap in the headspace dissolves into solution, and since the yeast are asleep, they won't produce more Co2. Don't leave it in the fridge for longer than 48 hours.

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Got it, thanks for the advice Josh!  And thanks for posting the recipe last year, worked great for me before!

 

On 2/19/2015 at 0:58 PM, MRB Josh R said:

Magic Hat #9 Clone:

1 American Ale
1 LME - Smooth
1.5 oz Apricot extract
.5 Cascade Hops
S-04 Yeast

Instructions:

Brew as normal, adding the hops at the end of the boil. Add the Apricot extract at bottling.

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I've had carb issues with S-04, I think. It might drop out so thoroughly that it looses potency to carb well if it's cold-crashed too long. It'll probably be completely clear when you get back. You could crash it a day or so if you want or just go right to the bottling bucket with it. I did that with a Fireman's #4 recipe using S-04 and it was perfect without ever cold-crashing.

 

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Thanks for the tip, JA.  Given other scheduled things on Thursday, I will likely cold-crash it for that day then bottle it on Friday. 

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New to brewing- 

Confused.....as normal.

Cold-crash after fermenting? 

In recipe I found from Josh, it didn't say to do this. 

So if I make this, do I "Cold crash" for 3 days then bottle and remove from drive for condition?

Bottle then "Cold crash", then condition?

Or do as other recipes, bottle and condition, then refrige for at least 3 days and drink?

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"Cold Crashing"  is a step to clarify the beer before bottling by chilling the fermented wort, so that the suspended particles drop to the bottom and the clearer beer can be removed to bottles.

Carbonation relies on there being enough yeast still remaining in suspension when the beer is bottled that it can ferment the priming sugar and carbonate the beer.

The issue noted above by JA with "carbing" must be because too much yeast has cleared from the beer during "Cold Crashing" so not enough is transferred to the bottles for making carbonation.

 

This is not something you HAVE to do.  It is something you CAN do if you want REALLY clear beer, especially if you are entering competitions.

Personally I have never done this, but I don't care about a little haze in my beer, although most times the beer will get pretty clear anyway. Yeast is healthy to ingest anyway.

 

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54 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

"Cold Crashing"  is a step to clarify the beer before bottling by chilling the fermented wort, so that the suspended particles drop to the bottom and the clearer beer can be removed to bottles.

Carbonation relies on there being enough yeast still remaining in suspension when the beer is bottled that it can ferment the priming sugar and carbonate the beer.

The issue noted above by JA with "carbing" must be because too much yeast has cleared from the beer during "Cold Crashing" so not enough is transferred to the bottles for making carbonation.

 

This is not something you HAVE to do.  It is something you CAN do if you want REALLY clear beer, especially if you are entering competitions.

Personally I have never done this, but I don't care about a little haze in my beer, although most times the beer will get pretty clear anyway. Yeast is healthy to ingest anyway.

 

Quote

 

 

Good explanation Nickfixit.

Makes sense to me. Maybe when I get more "experienced" I will try that, but for now I am ok with a little haze :).

But if I do decide to Cold Crash, I would just move my LBK gently to fridge for it (typically 3 days in fridge)?

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1 hour ago, Nickfixit said:

The issue noted above by JA with "carbing" must be because too much yeast has cleared from the beer during "Cold Crashing" so not enough is transferred to the bottles for making carbonation.

 

That's correct. I can't say for certain that the low carbing was caused by lack of yeast in suspension, but I know that S-04 drops like a rock and even without cold crash will be extremely clear after 3 weeks. Cold crashing for a while after than may have caused problems. I know that lagers that are cold-stored for a couple of months often are re-pitched with yeast to bottle. Mostly I've just backed off slightly on the pre-bottle clearing ritual so that a relatively minimal cold crash and the picking up some trub into the bottling bucket gives me very consistent, quick carb in the bottle.

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I have been cold-crashing from the beginning (this was my 17th batch), having read RickBeer's excellent explanation (find one of his posts and look in the links in his signature).  I have never had any issues with carbonation, but then again, I have never gone this long fermenting before, and this is maybe only my 3rd batch with S-04.  This one ended up at 25 days fermenting, then about 36 hours cold-crashing.  Hopefully it will carb up fine, but if not, lesson learned.  I am not really concerned with hazy beer either, but I do like getting the trub compacted and solidified, which helps get more beer out of the LBK.

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On 6/24/2016 at 10:11 PM, Nickfixit said:

The issue noted above by JA with "carbing" must be because too much yeast has cleared from the beer during "Cold Crashing" so not enough is transferred to the bottles for making carbonation.

 

No.  Cold crashing WILL NOT affect carbonation. I do it EVERY BATCH.  It makes the beer clearer, but that is not why I do it.  It solidifies the trub, so you get more beer out of the batch.  I leave maybe an ounce or two in the LBK.  See info in my signature.

 

I used S-04 for the stout I bottled earlier this month. Bottles are rock hard.

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

 

No.  Cold crashing WILL NOT affect carbonation. I do it EVERY BATCH.  It makes the beer clearer, but that is not why I do it.  It solidifies the trub, so you get more beer out of the batch.  I leave maybe an ounce or two in the LBK.  See info in my signature.

 

I used S-04 for the stout I bottled earlier this month. Bottles are rock hard.

Good to know. I wonder what his problem is then.   I suppose it does not take a lot of yeast to carbonate, it might just take longer.

 

Without cold crashing I still manage to get most of the beer out, but probably not that last cup that you do. The trub hardness for me greatly depends on the yeast but with care I can get all except a small puddle by the spigot. The last bottle for me is a partial PET bottle tester anyway. I think I lose more beer in the hop bags than left in the LBK.

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I gave up on cold crashing. I don't see the point. When the fermentation keg is set so that the trub settles away from the spigot then I get just about all the liquid out without issue. Plus, elimination of that step reduces the amount of transport of the keg and subsequent sloshing. If the bottles sit in the fridge for a while, the yeast settles and the beer is clear.

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I've noticed one thing about the 2 recipes that I've fermented using the cooler and frozen water bottle method.  Cold crashing is pretty much done for you.  Slowly but surely, by keeping the fermenting temperature between 60-65°, everything slowly trickles to the bottom.  My last recipe, the Megalodon IPA, had 7oz of hops in it and by the time it was ready to bottle the trub was completely compacted in the bottom.  What I thought was going to be a bottling nightmare, turned out to be a simple process with very little loss of product.

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For what you can see.  Cold crashing makes even more settle, as well as solidifying the trub.

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^^^What @RickBeer said...Cold crashing will lead to more of the suspended yeast dropping out and result in clearer beer with less yeast trub in the bottles. There are some yeasts that are not very flocculent and never really clear during secondary or even cold crash. Hefeweizen yeast is one. It will eventually clear in the bottle, but it leaves quite a bit of sediment. Most will clear nicely during cold-crash - definitely better than just secondary.

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