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pearlmikejam

All My Brews Have the Same "Finish"/Aftertaste

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I just bottled my third ale last weekend.  I have brewed the Diablo IPA (using cascade, simcoe and citra hops), the Santa Catalina Pale Ale (using cascade and simcoe hops) and now the Surly Dog IPA (using columbus, simcoe and falconers 7C hops), but they all seem to have the same finish, or aftertaste.  It is not bad, but I was expecting different flavor profiles given that each of these recipes uses a different combination of HMEs.  Why is that?  Is this just the signature flavor profile of Mr. Beer HMEs or is there something else at play here.

 

FWIW, I use spring water and do not experience any off flavors and, on two of the brews, boiled hops for up to 10 minutes to give a little different flavor.

 

Thanks in advance.

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I think you are experiencing the "homebrew twang". It's normal with extract beers. It can usually be diminished by steeping some specialty grains (4 oz Carapils would work for any of the recipes you mentioned) or by conditioning the beer for longer.

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41 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

I think you are experiencing the "homebrew twang". It's normal with extract beers. It can usually be diminished by steeping some specialty grains (4 oz Carapils would work for any of the recipes you mentioned) or by conditioning the beer for longer.

Thanks Josh!!!!  For Pale Ale varieties, is grain the best way to go?  Everything I read is that with hoppy beers, you are supposed to consume them right away.

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2 minutes ago, pearlmikejam said:

Thanks Josh!!!!  For Pale Ale varieties, is grain the best way to go?  Everything I read is that with hoppy beers, you are supposed to consume them right away.

 

That's correct. IPAs and other hop-forward beers shouldn't need long conditioning periods. Carapils works for pretty much any beer, but especially with pale ales since it offers some body and head retention without affecting the color. Dry-hopping your beer will also diminish the "twang".

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59 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

That's correct. IPAs and other hop-forward beers shouldn't need long conditioning periods. Carapils works for pretty much any beer, but especially with pale ales since it offers some body and head retention without affecting the color. Dry-hopping your beer will also diminish the "twang".

 

Thanks again.  I did not realize dry hopping would have an impact like that.  That explains why my first batch, which I dry hopped, had a less noticeable twang.  The others had a hop sac in the batch the whole time.

 

Out of curiosity, is the twang specific to all extract brewing or HME brewing?  I have been researching LME and DME recipes hoping to minimize the twang and brew something where I have better control of the hop profile.

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It's fairly common in all extract brewing.

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The Partial Mash seems to help though too as well as lower fermentation temps from what I brewed.

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On ‎6‎/‎20‎/‎2016 at 4:33 PM, Nickfixit said:

The Partial Mash seems to help though too as well as lower fermentation temps from what I brewed.

 

Plus one on the ferm temps, keep it in the  low range (58-62) for the first three days and then let it come up from there. Noticeably reduced twang.

 

Pitching too warm (especially with the Mr. Beer yeast I've noticed) can also impart more twang.

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Warno this post doesnt not reflect my views on anyone as a viewer. This is purely my own findings in my brewing journey.

 

Steeping grains have helped get rid of the twang in alot of extract brews I have done. When i first started thjis "twang" was a worry of mine as well. I was reassured by some experienced brewers that as my process is fine tuned, and I learn more tricks and patience, the twang will eventually go away. They where right. I have eliminated this flavor in almost every brew I make now. I do 5 gallon extracts and i keg them, so far I havnt had a "twangy" beer in almost a year.

 

Stick in there and you will blow yourself away.

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22 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

+1 for the use of WARNO @creamz13

Wtf is a warno? I was scanning for some user in the thread with that name? You silly Brewers and your darn acronyms. Lol, smh. Brb, ttyl suckas 

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3 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Wtf is a warno? I was scanning for some user in the thread with that name? You silly Brewers and your darn acronyms. Lol, smh. Brb, ttyl suckas 

 

It's not a brewing term, it's a military term. A WARNO is a preliminary notice of an order or action that is to follow. A OPORD is a directive issued by a commander to subordinate commanders for the purpose of effecting the coordinated execution of an operation. A FRAGO is issued after an OPORD to change, modify, or execute a branch or sequel to that order. I came from a military family so I know a thing or 2 about military stuff. :)

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6 hours ago, creamz13 said:

I do 5 gallon extracts and i keg them, so far I havnt had a "twangy" beer in almost a year.

 

Does that extract mean HME or LME?

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26 minutes ago, J A said:

 

Does that extract mean HME or LME?

Ooooooh, very good question. Waiting in anticipation 

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All of the twang in my Mr. Beer recipes went away when I started adding steeped grains, the right yeast for that type of beer, and became a temperature control fiend.  In other words...  When I started doing things right.  However, this guy NEVER lost his twang!  

 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

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6 hours ago, J A said:

 

Does that extract mean HME or LME?

Yes, also DME. The E = Extract, an HME is simply an LME that's had hops added.

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13 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

Yes, also DME. The E = Extract, an HME is simply an LME that's had hops added.

 

I know what it is...I'm asking what was used. :rolleyes::)

LME/DME extract batches with "fresh" hop additions are fundamentally different from HME recipes. My question goes to whether the "twang" went away in the absence of HME.

My experience has been that there's still a little something off even in non-HME, partial mash batches with up to 25% late addition LME. I've had full-60-minute-boil extract/hop addition beers that were superb in every way, though I haven't bothered with full-boil extracts, preferring to stick to getting to the best beers I can make with all-grain.

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Both HME and LME. even DME pending recipe. I still make mr. beer recipes(bewitchd amber is addicting). I just know i gotta give it time to do its magic.

 

I have noticed LME mellows out much faster then HME. I do full 60min boils with my recipes 30minute steeps. I also only add about 1/3 of my extract for the boil. Then the last 5 minutes of boil I add the remaining Extract. I cool it down to roughly room temp add yeast stash it away for 3 weeks. then its 3-7 days in keg on 20-30 PSI. I then lower the pressure in keg to 10(my serving pressure). let sit for another day and ussually its carbed for drinking by then.

 

I understand the risk of over carb with this method, so far i havnt had an over carb issue.

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Sorry JA I misunderstood.  The "twang" exists in all extracts (probably a side effect of low pressure boiling) IMHO using grains to steep mitigates the twang...somewhat. I mean, I noticed it more in a wheat or pilsner than in a porter or a stout.

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30 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

Sorry JA I misunderstood.  The "twang" exists in all extracts (probably a side effect of low pressure boiling) IMHO using grains to steep mitigates the twang...somewhat. I mean, I noticed it more in a wheat or pilsner than in a porter or a stout.

Everyone should just make a one gallon batch of all grain beer this weekend. For no real reason? Maybe the last weekend in july should be all grain day

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10 hours ago, Jim Johnson said:

Sorry JA I misunderstood.  The "twang" exists in all extracts (probably a side effect of low pressure boiling) IMHO using grains to steep mitigates the twang...somewhat. I mean, I noticed it more in a wheat or pilsner than in a porter or a stout.

 

No need for apology. :)

I've noticed the same thing, but with the extracts I've used, there's much, much less of any sharp flavor in the LME batches I've done. The truth is that I haven't used any HMEs after getting through 6 CAL kits. All of those were apply/twangy/harsh even after months of aging. I'm tempted to try a better HME recipe, just to see how much better it might be, but the cost effectiveness and consistently good results of all-grain win out. Since I've bought grain in 50# bags, a 5-gallon batch costs a little over $10 for fermentables. LME would cost $25. I suppose I could drop that cost by buying LME in bulk, but it would still be almost 2x the price.

 

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10 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Everyone should just make a one gallon batch of all grain beer this weekend. For no real reason? Maybe the last weekend in july should be all grain day

 

Make it 2 gallons and I'm in!:) One gallon is just hard to justify. ;)

I'll already be doing a 5-gallon Kolsch, IPA or "Boston Lager", depending on fermenter logistics. I'd be happy to throw down a quick 2-gallon SMASH while I'm at it and dust off an LBK to join in  the festive spirit of a mash-a-thon.

We can compare recipes and results. :)

 

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11 minutes ago, J A said:

 

Make it 2 gallons and I'm in!:) One gallon is just hard to justify. ;)

I'll already be doing a 5-gallon Kolsch, IPA or "Boston Lager", depending on fermenter logistics. I'd be happy to throw down a quick 2-gallon SMASH while I'm at it and dust off an LBK to join in  the festive spirit of a mash-a-thon.

We can compare recipes and results. :)

 

I didnt want to say 2 gallons cuz people would dump boiling hot water in their LBK. Maybe if i said 1 gallons people would still start with one gallon of cold water. Youd probably end up with 2% abv but thats better than a melted LBK

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I've made several 1G AG recipes and they turned out fine. It's definitely worth the time and effort if you've never tried it. True it's only 1G, not 2G-5G of beer but you can always make more.

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2 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

I didnt want to say 2 gallons cuz people would dump boiling hot water in their LBK. Maybe if i said 1 gallons people would still start with one gallon of cold water. Youd probably end up with 2% abv but thats better than a melted LBK

Pretty easy to cool down a couple of gallons. I use a home-made wort chiller and it's super fast, but even without one a cold water bath to get it started dropping and a bucket of ice to get it down to LBK temps is pretty quick.;)

1 hour ago, TonyKZ1 said:

I've made several 1G AG recipes and they turned out fine. It's definitely worth the time and effort if you've never tried it. True it's only 1G, not 2G-5G of beer but you can always make more.

Not for me...I've done 2 1/2 gallon batches and that works out just fine. Less than that just isn't worth making a mess and the difference in time for 1 gallon as opposed to 2 or 2 1/2 doesn't add up to much at all. :)

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12 hours ago, J A said:

 

No need for apology. :)

I've noticed the same thing, but with the extracts I've used, there's much, much less of any sharp flavor in the LME batches I've done. The truth is that I haven't used any HMEs after getting through 6 CAL kits. All of those were apply/twangy/harsh even after months of aging. I'm tempted to try a better HME recipe, just to see how much better it might be, but the cost effectiveness and consistently good results of all-grain win out. Since I've bought grain in 50# bags, a 5-gallon batch costs a little over $10 for fermentables. LME would cost $25. I suppose I could drop that cost by buying LME in bulk, but it would still be almost 2x the price.

 

Well I'm a little more flexible probably 'cause I only brewed 3 HMEs (1 cal 2 cerveza).  I'm just coming off an enforced no brewing spell, the first 2 I planned are HMEs just to get something going (a wheat and a pilsner) then a true brew extract kit (red rye). Then it'll be AG when feasible, otherwise HME/extract brewing. Still better than any beer I've found at the stores

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10 hours ago, Jim Johnson said:

the first 2 I planned are HMEs just to get something going

 

I know what you mean. I've got a pretty full pipeline, but since I started brewing 5-gallon batches the variety I have on hand is diminished and since I started kegging my supply of bottled beer is getting a little thin. I can keep 2 kegs cold but I don't want to drink the same beer for a month or two. Having plenty of bottles in the fridge is better. I'm going to do a few  batches to fill up my bottle supply. I think at least a some of the batches over the next couple of months will be LME/LBK batches. ;)

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23 minutes ago, J A said:

 

I know what you mean. I've got a pretty full pipeline, but since I started brewing 5-gallon batches the variety I have on hand is diminished and since I started kegging my supply of bottled beer is getting a little thin. I can keep 2 kegs cold but I don't want to drink the same beer for a month or two. Having plenty of bottles in the fridge is better. I'm going to do a few  batches to fill up my bottle supply. I think at least a some of the batches over the next couple of months will be LME/LBK batches. ;)

Might be a little costly but those bottle filling guns are amazing. For example, last night I decided to have one last beer but i only had home brew chilled. Oh wait, its beer i bottled from the keg! Pop the top and drink.

 

also theyre really handy when youre ready to keg a batch but you have a gallon or two left in your keg. Just bottle the remains and keg your new batch. Boom! Now who cares when you get to those bottles, theyre cool right where they are. Or you can drink one immediately. Its sweet. Better than I anticipated.

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8 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Might be a little costly but those bottle filling guns are amazing.

 

I was looking into that very thing just yesterday. I may even try to rig something temporarily using a separate purging system and a stopper/tube assembly on my Pluto keg dispenser.  

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6 minutes ago, J A said:

 

I was looking into that very thing just yesterday. I may even try to rig something temporarily using a separate purging system and a stopper/tube assembly on my Pluto keg dispenser.  

I saw a youtube video once of a guy using co2 to siphon from carboy to keg. Seemed cool but a lot of work. Im indifferent 

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