Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
JoshR

New Collaboration Recipe - Mesquite Agave Ale!!!

Recommended Posts

MesquiteAgave-Art.jpg

 

I've been VERY excited about this collaboration!!! This one comes straight out of Mr. Beer's hometown of Tucson, Arizona. This is a new bicycle-themed brewery, Catalina Brewing Company is headed up by a former schoolteacher and Mr. Beer brewer. They have some great beers, but this Mesquite Agave Ale is INCREDIBLE!!!
 

STORY:

Mesquite is the most common shrub/tree of the Desert Southwest. Native Americans used every part of this tree for centuries. In fact, the yellow mesquite pods are among the earliest known foods of prehistoric man in the new world. Many generations of indigenous Southwestern Americans relied on these pods as a dietary staple from which they made tea, syrup, and a ground meal called “pinole” that would be made into soups and breads.

 

Hank Rowe, Brewmaster at Catalina Brewing, has included this ancient ingredient in his Mesquite Agave Ale, which is only available in small batches at his Tucson taproom. But for a limited time, Mr. Beer is bringing this Southwestern treat to you. Catalina Brewery was started by business partners Brian Vance and Hank Rowe, who met through their mutual passion of mountain biking. Hank was regularly brewing with Mr. Beer, and when Brian tasted one of Hank’s favorite Mr. Beer brews (a hoppy IPA recipe he created himself), he said that Hank’s IPA was better than any he had tasted. From there, the idea to start their own brewery began to take shape, and Catalina Brewery was born.

PROFILE:

This beer exhibits the same characteristics as your average California Common, but with a Southwestern twist. Mesquite flour, made from the ground up yellow pods of the Mesquite tree, adds a nutty sweetness with subtle notes of cinnamon, hazelnut, and vanilla. These flavors and aromas dance in perfect harmony with the malty base of Crystal and 2-row malts. The addition of agave nectar adds a touch of dryness for balance.   

 

NOTE: While agave nectar is recommended (you can find it in most grocery stores), honey will work if you can't find agave in your area. The mesquite flour IS included, but the agave/honey is not.

 

Also keep in mind that this is a steam beer and uses a lager yeast at ale temps.

Get yours here: Mesquite Agave Ale

 

Cheers!! :D

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We also have some CBC silicone pint glasses for sale. They come in green and pink. Perfect for parties because they're unbreakable! And they glow in the dark!! I'm sure @HoppySmile! could use one of these. lol ;)

http://www.mrbeer.com/accessories/green-silicone-pint-glass

http://www.mrbeer.com/accessories/pink-silicone-pint-glass

 

For a limited time only!!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm very intrigued by the notion of brewing with flour. I've been seeing it in some commercial examples - most notably TiredHands Milkshake IPA series - though I haven't had an opportunity to try any.

 

Can you comment on any lessons learned or tips/tricks to brewing with flour? In this recipe, it looks like you add directly to the boil for 5 minutes (no grain bag), and the primary intent is to add flavor. Does it also contribute to haze or a turbid appearance? Mouthfeel?

 

Thanks in advance - really interesting recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thay wood work great if I get lost in the forest while camping and being hunted by sasquatch!!! I cud use them to lite up the darkness of night, and since they're un breakable I can hurl them with almighty might at the evil things that hunt me!!!!   Gern Blanstein, biography, 1932

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 209Hill said:

I'm very intrigued by the notion of brewing with flour. I've been seeing it in some commercial examples - most notably TiredHands Milkshake IPA series - though I haven't had an opportunity to try any.

 

Can you comment on any lessons learned or tips/tricks to brewing with flour? In this recipe, it looks like you add directly to the boil for 5 minutes (no grain bag), and the primary intent is to add flavor. Does it also contribute to haze or a turbid appearance? Mouthfeel?

 

Thanks in advance - really interesting recipe.

 

This isn't like typical grain flour. It's very high in natural sugars rather than starches so it's very soluble. While it is mostly for flavor, it does contribute some haze and a slightly creamy mouthfeel. Interestingly enough, you can also make a molasses from mesquite bean pods that works quite well in beer. But it is quite the process and commercial examples are expensive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Liquid Lunch said:

What type of agave nectar should be used? Raw, light, or something else?

 

This would be personal preference. I use what's available/affordable. It contributes more to dryness and mouthfeel than to flavor. That's why you can use honey, too, if agave nectar isn't available. The 2 are indistinguishable when used in similar recipes. I imagine darker agave will give you more flavor, just as darker honey would. Feel free to boost it up to 1 cup instead of half. It will dry it out a bit more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...