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AnthonyC

Lighter Color IPA

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I've made a few IPA's now and they always come out an amber color.  I want to make one that is much lighter in hue.  Would using golden lme be a good start?  Also, what if I added half of the lme with only 15mins left in the boil?  Will that help as well?  Just some background...  5 gallon recipe, not sure which hops as of yet, and this will not be an hme recipe, and thinking about using about 9.5lbs of lme. Thanks in advance.  :) 

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What is the HME bil l in your previous recipe? 

 

I brewed this High Peak IPA with good success. The brew came out with a pale ale color, great aroma and flavor. I was going to revisit it later by subtracting the wheat addition or reducing it to 1/4 pound. 

 

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I've tried using the Diablo...  obviously came out too dark.  I've also tried using the Northwestern Pale Ale.  

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Use the LP IPA Craft refill. It's much lighter than the Diablo.

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7 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

Use the LP IPA Craft refill. It's much lighter than the Diablo.

Thank you.  I'll give it a shot. :)

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

Use the LP IPA Craft refill. It's much lighter than the Diablo.

That one's on my short list @AnthonyC; I'll let you know how it turns out! I have a can on the shelf but one more PM to brew up before the grains turn on me. 

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3 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

That one's on my short list @AnthonyC; I'll let you know how it turns out! I have a can on the shelf but one more PM to brew up before the grains turn on me. 

Thanks, Sarge!  Keep me posted.  Much appreciated! :)

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8 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I've made a few IPA's now and they always come out an amber color.  I want to make one that is much lighter in hue.  Would using golden lme be a good start?  Also, what if I added half of the lme with only 15mins left in the boil?  Will that help as well?  Just some background...  5 gallon recipe, not sure which hops as of yet, and this will not be an hme recipe, and thinking about using about 9.5lbs of lme. Thanks in advance.  :) 

Anthony,

 

Try adding extra light DME instead of LME.  Also, make sure since this is an IPA that you put all of the extract in at the beginning.  If you add extract at the end, the bittering IBUs will not be as high because you created them in a wort that was at a lower gravity. 

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12 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

Anthony,

 

Try adding extra light DME instead of LME.  Also, make sure since this is an IPA that you put all of the extract in at the beginning.  If you add extract at the end, the bittering IBUs will not be as high because you created them in a wort that was at a lower gravity. 

Wont the wort get darker the more you boil it so adding lighter malts at the end will be less dark than adding them earlier and darkening them?

 

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39 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

Anthony,

 

Try adding extra light DME instead of LME.  Also, make sure since this is an IPA that you put all of the extract in at the beginning.  If you add extract at the end, the bittering IBUs will not be as high because you created them in a wort that was at a lower gravity. 

Never considered using dme.  Was I correct or incorrect in saying that the longer the lme boil the darker it will become?  Thank you for the input, 

 

Just saw that Nick asked the same thing.

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A brewer friend of mine makes extract IPAs with full 60 minute boil that come out amazingly light and clear looking. Light LME/DME - or Pilsner if you can find - it is the way to go.

I'm not sure there's a sure-fire way you can get there with HMEs, and partial boil additions. Maybe if you keep the wort volume and extract additions balanced so the wort gravity never goes over what it would be at the start of a full-boil recipe and then keep the late additions as late as possible. Also adding LME or DME slowly to make sure that it's not dropping to the bottom of the pot and getting a little scorched should help. 

I've only done all-grain as full boil. Those are fine, of course, but late-addition recipes even with fresh LMEs and careful additions tend to get darker than I'd like. 

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I brewed a SMASH Ale with Pilsen LME and Simcoe hops and it was the lightest beer I have ever made. It tasted outstanding, too. 

 

The Sir Kenneth Blonde kit was the only other extract beer I brewed that came in spot on for color. 

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Okay I ordered 6lbs of light LME & 3lbs of light DME.  I'm definitely not going with any HME b/c that mysterious HME taste that I too often get is REALLY pissing me off.  Now I've read a few places that boiling the LME/DME isn't even necessary.  Of course this takes the hops out of the equation.  Perhaps a hop tea for this??  Anyway, any input on the not boiling the LME/DME and just letting it simmer instead??  Thanks in advance.

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You won't get the IBUs you're after in an IPA without a boil, but if you're willing to pile in some bittering hops you could easily get away with a 30min boil.

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8 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Okay I ordered 6lbs of light LME & 3lbs of light DME.  I'm definitely not going with any HME b/c that mysterious HME taste that I too often get is REALLY pissing me off.  Now I've read a few places that boiling the LME/DME isn't even necessary.  Of course this takes the hops out of the equation.  Perhaps a hop tea for this??  Anyway, any input on the not boiling the LME/DME and just letting it simmer instead??  Thanks in advance.

 

I suggest yout find a recipe to make.  Doing LME/DME without steeping grains and without bittering hops won't be very good.  Not boiling is crazy.

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Steeping grains are in the cards.  I even found which hops I would like to use--pacific jade.  I won't be using butter for this recipe ;)   Just kidding, Rick.  I understood what you meant. :)

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13 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

 Anyway, any input on the not boiling the LME/DME and just letting it simmer instead??

 

The boil doesn't have to be particularly vigorous, but the temp should be higher than just a simmer or steeping temp.  I'm not certain there's a solid consensus, but there doesn't seem to be a compelling reason to boil the crap out of an all-grain and definitely not an extract. The reduction has taken place and you're essentially diluting the sugars enough to be able to add enough heat to get everything done. 

Whether it's a full boil with bittering hops or a partial boil with 20 or 30 minute hop boil, most of the work you're doing is hop utilization. Gently rolling boil seems to be good and it's easier to control boil-off rate.There's some caramelization and some Maillard reaction (similar things, but different molecular processes...I don't understand the science there and I doubt seriously that even seasoned brewers really do, either) so that the character of the wort is cooked and transformed, hopefully in a good way, to get rid of the twang or green, unfinished quality.

I really want to do some full-boil extract because I can still taste a big difference in my all-grain brews and the partial boil/late extract addition ones. Those are quite fine and definitely way beyond the HME ones that I did, but they're not as smooth and lack malt character. 

 

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13 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Okay I ordered 6lbs of light LME & 3lbs of light DME.  I'm definitely not going with any HME b/c that mysterious HME taste that I too often get is REALLY pissing me off.  Now I've read a few places that boiling the LME/DME isn't even necessary.  Of course this takes the hops out of the equation.  Perhaps a hop tea for this??  Anyway, any input on the not boiling the LME/DME and just letting it simmer instead??  Thanks in advance.

Cooper's Kit 6 gal recipes do not have you boil the LME/DME, just mix it.

The only reason to boil I can see is hop utilization or sterilization of something.

That said I still do bring mine to boil before adding HME. I may try not doing that and see if it is less twangy.

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

 

I suggest yout find a recipe to make.  Doing LME/DME without steeping grains and without bittering hops won't be very good.  Not boiling is crazy.

I made a Coopers Dark Ale without  grains or hops added and it was a nice mild ale. But this all depends on ones beer liking/taste. I did boil the water before adding HME. and booster. (yes - booster..... horrors, their recipe - but it worked.)

I also made some with same HME and added hops and malt. Also nice but just different. 

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I just got done with the last of my original "quick" beers - simple DME/LME recipes I came up with after I got done with the original run of CAL brews. This one was a wheat ale using S-33 yeast. I was curious about the color so I compared the color predicted by the calculator with what the beer turned out to be (and after sitting for several months conditioning) and it was pretty much spot on. It was a short boil with light DME for hops, late addition Wheat LME and a few ounces of brown sugar to feed the wort after a couple of days fermentation.

Using DME (packaged in 3 lb bags) and fresh LME with the late addition method seems to have kept the color in the proper range.

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Well the IPA I started today based on "American Lager HME" I used 11 oz Golden Light DME and about 2 oz of Sparkling Amber DME besides a small grain PM with nothing very dark in it, (similar to LEO IPA but with 4 oz 2 row as well) so I guess that will be not very dark, but not straw yellow either Maybe SRM 5 or 6??

For what its worth, I threw in a packed of older Mr B yeast into the boil as nutrient and I am fermenting this with US-05

 

I had a can of Firestone Walker Easy Jack session IPA. That was quite refreshing and straw colored.
 

 

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12 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Steeping grains are in the cards.  I even found which hops I would like to use--pacific jade.  I won't be using butter for this recipe ;)   Just kidding, Rick.  I understood what you meant. :)


What NO  butter??   What would Julia Child say................ All recipes are better with butter.

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If the HME is fresh and anywhere in the light lager range, I'd bet you'll be in the low 4 range with that recipe. If it ranges further into the Muhich/Amber HME range, you'll be well over 5, but probably not to 7...that's pretty dark. It might surprise you. Whatever color it is, it'll be nice and clear and sounds like it'll be a good beer.

Good luck with it! ;)

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On June 27, 2016 at 5:53 AM, AnthonyC said:

I've made a few IPA's now and they always come out an amber color.  I want to make one that is much lighter in hue.  Would using golden lme be a good start?  Also, what if I added half of the lme with only 15mins left in the boil?  Will that help as well?  Just some background...  5 gallon recipe, not sure which hops as of yet, and this will not be an hme recipe, and thinking about using about 9.5lbs of lme. Thanks in advance.  :) 

My briess ipa's using golden light lme is always beautiful.

 

also... Call me crazy... But ive been watching this post and no one has suggested just lowering the abv by adding more water thus lowering the srm. Session IPA??? Why not? 

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1 hour ago, Creeps McLane said:

no one has suggested just lowering the abv by adding more water

 

But...I don't think lowering the ABV was ever a goal. :huh:

Just making an extract beer that's not several shades darker than it should be.

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9 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

My briess ipa's using golden light lme is always beautiful.

 

also... Call me crazy... But ive been watching this post and no one has suggested just lowering the abv by adding more water thus lowering the srm. Session IPA??? Why not? 

 

Yes, why not. I will be working in this direction I like flavor but not having my tongue curl up or still tasting the hops in the morning.

 

Talking of lowering ABV, I was reading a newspaper bit about the pint glass going out of fashion and beer being served in smaller glasses. I point to craft beer for that trend as the Craft beer trend seems to be to pack as much into the beer as possible, making a 16 oz pour of 7-10% beer a much more daunting drink than if it was 3-4% (old style beer).  I am pretty sure the beer of my youth was in that region as one could consume several 20 oz pints (UK) and still walk. Try that with some of the craft beers today - lol. 

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Close your eyes...

 

I, too, would go for taste over color. My beers tend to be darker as I add amber or dark malts to get the caramel (amber) or the munich malt flavor (dark). But  most of the time I am not trying to imitate  "style" or a specific brew so it is no issue for me. People tasting mine have generally liked the tastes but commented on the color being dark. I took some samples to a brewing club earlier this week and the folks there were really surprised with what I had from the HME/LBK approach although their  (all grain) samples more closely approached commercial craft beers.

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13 hours ago, J A said:

 

But...I don't think lowering the ABV was ever a goal. :huh:

Just making an extract beer that's not several shades darker than it should be.

Very true, but I don't think there is a thread out there that maintained the focus of its original content.  That's okay though.  It makes for interesting reading. ;)

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