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Norman Sands

My first bottling with mr beer

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I am going to bottle my first batch of Mr Beer tomorrow. I have the 750 o2 Pet Bottles. The recipe was Horses Ass

 

First Question what is the difference between the regular pet bottles and the O2 barrier bottles? Becuase I am thinking about buying more so I can run another Batch.

 

Second Question I saw someone on youtube Bottle his beer and he squeezed the bottle to remove the air is this correct way with the pet bottles?

 

Third Question in a 750 ML Pet O2 bottle it says 2 conditioning tablets per bottle to carbonate. I have honey as my sugar in my batch, Is it ok to add a drop with the conditioning tablets to add flavor ? and do you condition every recipe at 68-76 degrees?

 

Thanks for any help

Norman Sands

 

 

 

 

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1st-Welcome to the forums, Norm.  I can only answer one of your questions.  Adding honey won't do a doggone thing for flavor.  What it will do is dry out your beer and add some ABV, but not much if you only add a drop per bottle.  I will give you this recommendation based on experience--Unless you like very carbonated beer, cut down your sugar per bottle by 1/3.  If you don't, your beer will be more like seltzer than beer.  

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 1 - O2 barrier bottles are designed to negate the passage of oxygen into and co2 out of the bottle when paired with o2 barrier caps. Bottle manufacturers have met with limited success in creating a good barrier for beer packaging. Transition to glass as soon as possible. You'll be glad you did

2 - Your beer will carbonate either way. Squeezing the bottle before capping just makes it easier to tell when they are getting carbonated.  

3 - All bottle conditioned beer should be kept above 70F while conditioning. AC is right, you won't gain any flavor from adding honey. It will just dry out your beer. If you want honey flavor you need to use honey malt when you're brewing. 

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What do you mean "honey as the sugar in my beer"?

 

Do not squeeze PET bottles.

 

O2 barrier are only for very long storage.  Like 2 years.

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Norman, welcome.

Granulated sugar or the drops is OK for carbonating/conditioning in the bottle, but I find it easier to use the Domino sugar dots (cubes), the 199 cubes to the lb box. I use 2 or 3 for the 750ml and 4 or 5 for the 1L bottles depending on how much fizz I want.

Adding honey to the bottle will add more sugar - it will ferment so you will get some extra unmeasured carbonation - not good.

Brewing rule is 3 weeks to ferment, 4 weeks to mature, 3 days in fridge then drink. This has been found to give best results by the forum participants. Some beers benefit from storing longer than 4 weeks.

 

Comments on the video.

Lots of strange stuff in this video, It must be old. I have not seen the type of spigot on it before it must be old.

He is using 1L bottles, they came with the older kits. (DO NOT use this much sugar in the 750 ML.

He has (maybe added) a bubbler on the LBK lid. You do not need one, there are vents for the CO2 to get out. You might see bubbles but with the vents, maybe not, unless you screw the lid real tight.. If you have fermented for the standard 3 weeks you will be done anyway, and you can look through  the side with a flashlight to see no bubbling. The vents will also let air back in the LBK when you are bottling. No need to loosen lid unless you screwed it on extra tight (also not needed)

 

I see he has the caps in a bag. I do not see he sanitizing the caps. You need to do that. My process does that easily.

I do not squeeze air out of my bottles, I don't see a problem doing it. It will maybe prevent some beer oxidation. It may be worth a taste to compare experiment with a light beer. (do half the batch with squeeze and half without then open one of each to taste test them.)

Putting LBK in the dark is not a bad idea although the brown color makes that not really needed if you keep it out of sunlight. The Fermenting generates heat so be careful putting it in a cooler unless you monitor temperature, as it might get too hot. You could always leave the lid propped open a bit.

The beer he shows pouring he says is a "Cowboy" that is a very old style of beer kit from Mr Beer (matches the spigot vintage).

"No oxygen to make the beer flat..." Makes no sense.

He is right about the sanitizer powder, be careful not to breath that. I hold my breath while pouring it. It really can irritate your lungs.

 

I put my LBK with the spigot over the sink when I fill, so no drips to clean up.

When it is getting down and needs tilting, I take off the lid so I can see what the trub is doing and tilt the far end from the spigot up by hand to get all the rest of the beer out without trub.

I keep the bottles with sanitizing solution in them and their caps ON until Iam ready to fill the bottle. I keep them on the counter so I can bottle in the sink.

 

My bottling process is:

Clean bottles with bottle brush and warm water, there will often be debris stuck up at the top on reuse.

Dissolve 1/2 pack sanitizer in 1 gal pot of hot water,

Using a jug, put about  2-3 inches in a bottle, put on the cap, invert bottle, shake it, release pressure by unscrewing lid until some liquid comes out then recap and stand on counter until ready to fill.  Wait 10 minutes.

Take any hop bags out of LBK with sanitized tongs so they do not block spigot from inside

Empty sanitizer out of a bottle, put in the sugar cubes set cap aside.

Fill to required level, recap bottle, check cap is tight, invert once to mix sugar (optional)

Repeat per bottle.

Last bottle, take off cap and carefully tilt LBK by hand to ensure you get all the beer and no trub.

Store to carbonate.

 

Hope this helps :-)

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Very old fermenter had an airlock.  That old video should be ignored.

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I would not squeeze the air from the PET bottle. And, if you switch to glass, then what? I can't imagine that small bit of oxygen makes a big difference, and (Josh fill us in here if you can) perhaps is important in the conditioning process. As already mentioned, many of us use less than the MB recommended amounts of sugar. Your call. Try it both ways. As for honey, leave it for the bees and not as a priming sugar. Good luck. let us know in a month or so how the beer turns out. Oh, and welcome to the forum.

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2 hours ago, Brian N. said:

I would not squeeze the air from the PET bottle. And, if you switch to glass, then what? I can't imagine that small bit of oxygen makes a big difference, and (Josh fill us in here if you can) perhaps is important in the conditioning process. As already mentioned, many of us use less than the MB recommended amounts of sugar. Your call. Try it both ways. As for honey, leave it for the bees and not as a priming sugar. Good luck. let us know in a month or so how the beer turns out. Oh, and welcome to the forum.

 

Yeah, squeezing the air out of the bottle serves no purpose. When you fill the bottle, Co2 that was created during fermentation will off-gas forcing the O2 out. Even if that 1-2 inches of headspace was filled with oxygen, it wouldn't be enough to oxidize the beer at all, especially in those larger bottles. 

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I am waiting to bottle another week. I thought it was 2 weeks to ferment, But I am going to do the 3 weeks, one more week and then bottle. 5 weeks condition and 3  days in fridge. Patience seems to be the key!

 

I am going to try an easy IPA with grains and hops right after bottling this one any suggestions???

 

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Yes, one suggestion (question) - As a new brewer, why jump right into grains and hops before you know how your basic extract beers turn out? Brewing is a fun hobby. but even an avid new golfer, tennis player, or for any endeavor starts simple. There is a lot of satisfaction in brewing a simple recipe that turns out terrific. There is a lot of disappointment in brewing complex beers that turn out lousy. Just my humble opinion. Later today I having one of my last Winter Dark Ales that turned out great. A simple, straight up extract brew, no additions. 

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13 hours ago, Norman Sands said:

I am waiting to bottle another week. I thought it was 2 weeks to ferment, But I am going to do the 3 weeks, one more week and then bottle. 5 weeks condition and 3  days in fridge. Patience seems to be the key!

 

I am going to try an easy IPA with grains and hops right after bottling this one any suggestions???

 

 

I'd agree with a lot of people here about goign simple to start.  Trust me, it get's really exciting when you find a hobby you love and just want to try it all!  I started brewing in March of this year and have brewed about 15 batches already.  I started simple and have graduated to 5 gallon batches, dry hopping, grains, 60 min boils, mad scientist experiments, but it all started with the simple recipes.  With anything you have a passion for you want to jump from step 1 on the ladder to step 10 overnight, but I think a lot of people will agree with me, that you want to just enjoy the process of learning everything you can and starting simple is fine, because if you enjoy doing the simple, you're going to enjoy doing the complex.  Oh, and welcome to a new hobby and the forums! You won't want to stop! 

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Just now, Nickfixit said:

I hope the CO2 does not force the O2 (or N2)  out of MY bottles, to me that would mean I did not tighten them enough or I need a new cap!

 

Every time you fill your bottles, the Co2 forces the O2 out. It has nothing to do with the caps.

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Just now, MRB Josh R said:

 

Every time you fill your bottles, the Co2 forces the O2 out. It has nothing to do with the caps.

Yeah, I reread and deleted already.

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Maybe I will order the Diablo Pale Ale i don't think there is much simpler! Would adding a bag of any hops at end in a bag be bad? or keep it simple ?

 

Some day hope to learn to make a Chimay Clone!!!

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On ‎8‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 8:21 PM, Jim Johnson said:

Welcome to the forum. If you want honey flavor, well you get that from grain.

I use honey malt in my wheat and cerveza beers! a lot goes a long way, for a balanced flavor, regardless of what extract u use, 1 oz. of honey malt will suffice

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8 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

I use honey malt in my wheat and cerveza beers! a lot goes a long way, for a balanced flavor, regardless of what extract u use, 1 oz. of honey malt will suffice

 

8 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

I use honey malt in my wheat and cerveza beers! a lot goes a long way, for a balanced flavor, regardless of what extract u use, 1 oz. of honey malt will suffice

Not sure why the quote doubled but...

Does it really taste like honey or is it just sweet?

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once again after I posted, it said it was saving for like 3 minutes then I saw the post, but never saw the dble post??? odd

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1 hour ago, AnthonyC said:

 

Not sure why the quote doubled but...

Does it really taste like honey or is it just sweet?

it's got a slight honey sweet flavor, when I brew it with the wild wheat recipe, it kinda helps blend the CAL and wiessenbier together! I've tried it with a cple of crevezas, and with adequate conditioning it enhances the cerveza with a slight sweetness. above I wrote " a lot goes a long way" when I meant " a little goes a long way"

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5 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

once again after I posted, it said it was saving for like 3 minutes then I saw the post, but never saw the dble post??? odd

just ignore this, I thot I dble posted, must be this cheap canned beer i'm drinking

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28 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

it's got a slight honey sweet flavor, when I brew it with the wild wheat recipe, it kinda helps blend the CAL and wiessenbier together! I've tried it with a cple of crevezas, and with adequate conditioning it enhances the cerveza with a slight sweetness. above I wrote " a lot goes a long way" when I meant " a little goes a long way"

Yeah , I have not tried Honey Malt but I use Traditional Dark DME for same idea, to add residual sweetness. Don't need much, 1/2 to 1 cup max.

 

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22 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

to add residual sweetness

yeah that's the word I was thinking about, residential sweetness. the honey malt gives my crevezas the residential sweetness I've been trying to acheif and that's the main reason I use it

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On August 4, 2016 at 11:41 PM, Norman Sands said:

I am waiting to bottle another week. I thought it was 2 weeks to ferment, But I am going to do the 3 weeks, one more week and then bottle. 5 weeks condition and 3  days in fridge. Patience seems to be the key!

 

I am going to try an easy IPA with grains and hops right after bottling this one any suggestions???

 

It's bottling day, Norm!!!  YOU PUMPED!!!!  ???

image.jpeg

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Honey can be a good replacement as a sweet ingredient. I am watching your first brew, and it has been impressive. I am also very excited to have my first bottling.

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4 hours ago, lilyalvin said:

Honey can be a good replacement as a sweet ingredient. I am watching your first brew, and it has been impressive. I am also very excited to have my first bottling.

 

Honey does not add sweetness.

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5 hours ago, lilyalvin said:

Honey can be a good replacement as a sweet ingredient. I am watching your first brew, and it has been impressive. I am also very excited to have my first bottling.

Hi Lily,

Honey can be good in beers as a fermentable sugar, but the sugars will ferment and not leave it sweet - just the opposite actually, unlike the Honey Malt and the other things mentioned above that have unfermentable sweet stuff in them that stays sweet in the bottle.  Don't expect honey to add sweetness to the final bottling unless you pasteurize it first  lol.

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