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NEW RECIPE - Lock, Stock, and Barrel Imperial Stout!!!!

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This is one of our biggest beers yet, next to our Novacaine barleywine recipe. I have a 5 gallon Cornelius keg of it aging in my cellar fridge right now. It will be bottled in December. I took a taste of it a few days ago and it already tastes incredible. I soaked my oak in Bulliet bourbon, but you can use whatever whiskey or rum you want. It is highly recommended that you age this for at LEAST 6 months.

 

Cheers!

 

Get yours HERE!

 

We also have oak chips available separately: http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/special-adjuncts/american-oak-chips

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Just now, Bonsai & Brew said:

Nice recipe @MRB Josh R!:)

 

Thanks! I honestly think this is one of our best yet. It may be a little pricey, but it's worth every penny.

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I looked at this one, being a fan of Imperial Stouts and having made a rather less-ambitious version myself some six months ago (also based around 2 St Patrick's HMEs).  However, the price point is simply too much for my brewing budget.  Intriguing, but my money would be better spent on supplies for several batches.  However, I hope some of our intrepid Forum members attempt this beast and share their results with us.  Kudos to Josh for pushing the boundaries of what one can brew using HME.

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4 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

 

This is one of our biggest beers yet, next to our Novacaine barleywine recipe. I have a keg of it aging in my cellar fridge right now. It will be bottled in December. I took a taste of it a few days ago and it already tastes incredible. I soaked my oak in Bulliet bourbon, but you can use whatever whiskey or rum you want. It is highly recommended that you age this for at LEAST 6 months.

 

Cheers!

Wow!  Sounds spectacular...but I'm missing something in your description of your batch.  You say you have a keg aging in your cellar fridge right now and it tastes incredible right now and will be bottled in December.  I didn't see in the instructions anything about transferring the fermented batch into a keg and conditioning it in a fridge for four months before bottling.  Maybe I missed that.  Is that an extra conditioning step that is optional?  Is that necessary or can you bottle and carbonate it after the initial two weeks of fermentation and then the additional week with the whisky chips?  Does the kit include towels for cleaning up when the LBK overflows during high Krausen?!!  As MichaelL said earlier, "thanks for pushing the boundaries of what one can brew using HME"!  I might have to try it...but for $2.50 a bottle, I've got to make sure I know what I'm doing!!  Thanks again for thinking outside the keg!

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10 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Thanks! I honestly think this is one of our best yet. It may be a little pricey, but it's worth every penny.

I really like that this recipe uses Nottingham.:)

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6 hours ago, MichaelL said:

I looked at this one, being a fan of Imperial Stouts and having made a rather less-ambitious version myself some six months ago (also based around 2 St Patrick's HMEs).  However, the price point is simply too much for my brewing budget.  Intriguing, but my money would be better spent on supplies for several batches.  However, I hope some of our intrepid Forum members attempt this beast and share their results with us.  Kudos to Josh for pushing the boundaries of what one can brew using HME.

'Intrepid' -- I like that.  Although I'm not sure that describes my disposition, I will brew this. ;)  BTW, I've followed the Saga of the Mad Scientist Imperial Stout from its inception!  How was Bottle #4?

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Hoppy's gonna go broke on this one!  This recipe is right up his alley!!! ?

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4 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

'Intrepid' -- I like that.  Although I'm not sure that describes my disposition, I will brew this. ;)  BTW, I've followed the Saga of the Mad Scientist Imperial Stout from its inception!  How was Bottle #4?

It was mmmarvelous!  Thanks for asking.  It's almost time to pop another in the fridge and see how things are progressing.  Trying to ration these carefully, even more so since I lost one to a bottle bomb awhile back.

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On 8/12/2016 at 8:59 PM, K5WX said:

Wow!  Sounds spectacular...but I'm missing something in your description of your batch.  You say you have a keg aging in your cellar fridge right now and it tastes incredible right now and will be bottled in December.  I didn't see in the instructions anything about transferring the fermented batch into a keg and conditioning it in a fridge for four months before bottling.  Maybe I missed that.  Is that an extra conditioning step that is optional?  Is that necessary or can you bottle and carbonate it after the initial two weeks of fermentation and then the additional week with the whisky chips?  Does the kit include towels for cleaning up when the LBK overflows during high Krausen?!!  As MichaelL said earlier, "thanks for pushing the boundaries of what one can brew using HME"!  I might have to try it...but for $2.50 a bottle, I've got to make sure I know what I'm doing!!  Thanks again for thinking outside the keg!

 

Read the instructions for the recipe. It's all there. Just because I use kegs doesn't mean you have to (keep in mind, I'm referring to steel Co2 kegs, not LBKs). :P But if you did have a kegging system, you should use cubes instead of chips, like I did. That way you can put the cubes in the keg and age the beer on them. This will give you the closest thing to a barrel without buying a barrel. With that said, the chips will work in a similar way while in the fermenter, but because they have so much surface area, they will impart the oak and bourbon flavors much faster than cubes (it also takes longer for the cubes to soak up the bourbon). So I wouldn't recommend using the chips in your steel kegs because they will overwhelm the beer with oak flavor. But once you bottle your beer, there will be enough oak and bourbon in the bottles from the oak chips to round out the flavors while aging. Either method will work, but kegging with cubes is slightly better, I think.

 

BTW, 2 gallon kegging systems are coming soon to Mr. Beer. ;) 
 

On 8/12/2016 at 7:47 PM, MichaelL said:

I looked at this one, being a fan of Imperial Stouts and having made a rather less-ambitious version myself some six months ago (also based around 2 St Patrick's HMEs).  However, the price point is simply too much for my brewing budget.  Intriguing, but my money would be better spent on supplies for several batches.  However, I hope some of our intrepid Forum members attempt this beast and share their results with us.  Kudos to Josh for pushing the boundaries of what one can brew using HME.

 

For those that are hesitant about the price, keep in mind that this recipe is actually CHEAPER than almost all of the store-bought versions of this style. Many 22 - 25 oz bottles of bourbon barrel aged stouts are around $10 - $30 PER BOTTLE. This recipe translates to just under $5 per 740ml bottle. That's a damn good price for a barrel-aged-style stout, if you ask me. ;)

 

Also, this beer is really intended to be made for special occasions and as gifts for friends because of the long conditioning time. This isn't something that is to be brewed in 6-8 weeks and casually consumed (unless you're HoppySmile, of course).

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I updated my original post to reflect the fact that I used steel Cornelius kegs to carbonate and store my beer. Some people were confused thinking I was using the LBK (that was my mistake). You CANNOT carbonate in or age in the LBK. It's for fermentation only! Hopefully this clears things up. Cheers! :)

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@MRB Josh R, in your HONEST & UNBIASED opinion...  How close is this to Goose Island Bourbon County??  I'm going to condition this for a year.  

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41 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

@MRB Josh R, in your HONEST & UNBIASED opinion...  How close is this to Goose Island Bourbon County??  I'm going to condition this for a year.  

 

I haven't tried the finished, aged product yet, but already tastes amazing. I can't help but be biased and I think it's better than GIBC. Though it is a little lighter in body (not by much) and a little lower in ABV. But I think because you can use your favorite whiskey (or rum, etc), you have a bit more creative control over the flavor. I used Bulliet, which is a rye-heavy bourbon, and one of my favorite bourbons (decent price, too). And because I can get some of the spicy rye notes along with the wood flavors and chocolate notes, I'm already in love with this beer. And to be completely honest, I was never a fan of GIBC. I think there are MUCH better bourbon barrel stouts out there (such as Anderson Valley's Wild Turkey Bourbon Barrel Stout). So yeah, definitely biased. lol

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Thank you, sir.  As always, your honesty is greatly appreciated.  Josh, how would I add more "body" to it.  Double/triple up on the Oats/2-row??

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7 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

Thank you, sir.  As always, your honesty is greatly appreciated.  Josh, how would I add more "body" to it.  Double/triple up on the Oats/2-row??

 

More malt extract. A 3rd Irish Stout would do it. That would also give you a more similar ABV to the GIBC. Just be careful and brew it at low temps or it will make a huge mess.

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2 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

More malt extract. A 3rd Irish Stout would do it. That would also give you a more similar ABV to the GIBC. Just be careful and brew it at low temps or it will make a huge mess.

I have 5 Saint Pats.  Thanks again, Josh!!

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On ‎8‎/‎13‎/‎2016 at 5:58 AM, AnthonyC said:

Hoppy's gonna go broke on this one!  This recipe is right up his alley!!! ?

Josh, I think the Baltic porter would be a good shot in my barrel, and I also use Bulliet bourbon, so man, i'm thinking of doing one of each, bcuz when my 2nd bourbon aged porter was brewed I used 3 WDA's so i'm willing to try something different to compare, this recipe looks very inviting....

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11 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

I also have an a.g. recipe for this, what should I do man!!!!?????

Do 'em both, Hoppy!  They have to sit for about a year anyway so why not???

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LHBS would only sell grains at a 1/4lb minimum.  What would be the effect of using 4oz compared to the recommended 2oz?  Keep in my that I am following Josh's advice and using 3 Saint Pat's and 2oz of oak chips.  Thanks in advance.  

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Just buy 4 oz and split it in half. The effect of using 4 oz will depend on which grain it is.

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It was all of the required grains for this recipe.  Sorry about all the questions.  This recipe has got me pumped!

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Unless you like your beer to taste like burnt charcoal, use the suggested amount of grains.

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Again, "what would be the effect" from an ABV, IBU, and SRM standpoint can be seen in brewing software.

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6 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Unless you like your beer to taste like burnt charcoal, use the suggested amount of grains.

Just curious, y'all use Black Patent or Chocolate for color? (I'm betting B.P.)

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Again, "what would be the effect" from an ABV, IBU, and SRM standpoint can be seen in brewing software.

Reminds me too much of calling a credit card company and getting the prompts.  I'd rather hear it from an experienced human being.  

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6 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Unless you like your beer to taste like burnt charcoal, use the suggested amount of grains.

BBQ'd beer...  you might be onto something there!!

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1 hour ago, Nickfixit said:

Imperial Red Ale would go well with BBQ probably.

I meant more like a bbq flavored beer.  I have a Brewers Best recipe for a smoked porter that I imagine kinda tastes like a bbq.

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10 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Reminds me too much of calling a credit card company and getting the prompts.  I'd rather hear it from an experienced human being.  

 

#lazy

 

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again speaking of burnt charcoal, my dad told me when I was a kid he kept catching me digging into the ashtray and I would eat the burnt sulfur from the match stick heads??? u noe, I actually remember doing that, and for some stupid reason I ate all in the ashtray. so maybe a burnt charcoal beer recipe is what I need to re-live the fond childhood memories???

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14 hours ago, Jim Johnson said:

Just curious, y'all use Black Patent or Chocolate for color? (I'm betting B.P.)

 

We carry both grains and use them both for color, but the LSB Stout uses Chocolate and Roasted Barley. The St. Pat's Irish Stout base does have some Black Patent in it, though.

 

If getting a dark grain just for color and not flavor, I'd use Black Patent and cold steep it for 12 hours. Or better yet, dehusked Carafa III.

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9 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

We carry both grains and use them both for color, but the LSB Stout uses Chocolate and Roasted Barley. The St. Pat's Irish Stout base does have some Black Patent in it, though.

 

If getting a dark grain just for color and not flavor, I'd use Black Patent and cold steep it for 12 hours. Or better yet, dehusked Carafa III.

I've heard that a cold steep will cut down the BPs astringency. Truth to tell, the line about burned charcoal is why I ask that's what BP tastes like to me. So I prefer chocolate.(I save the roast barley for my Irish Reds)

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4 hours ago, Liquid Lunch said:

Out of stock now. Any chance it's coming back sometime soon?

It may just be the hops, or one of the grains.  Do you have a LHBS by you?  You may be able to find the missing ingredient there.  Good luck. :)

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On 8/19/2016 at 5:49 PM, Jim Johnson said:

I've heard that a cold steep will cut down the BPs astringency. Truth to tell, the line about burned charcoal is why I ask that's what BP tastes like to me. So I prefer chocolate.(I save the roast barley for my Irish Reds)

 

Yeah, cold steeping will minimize the astringency. BP won't give off a lot of charcoal flavor if you cold-steep it, but the flavor is still there. Chocolate works well, but I never seem to get enough color from it when cold-steeping for my Cascadian dark ales and such. It mostly just becomes a hoppy brown ale. But like I said, dehusked Carafa III is the BEST for cold steeping for color. A lot of astringency actually comes from the husks of the grain, and Carafa has been dehusked before it was kilned. It's great for bocks, doppelbocks, and is the malt that gives more dunkelweizens their dark color. It's a very smooth dark malt for adding color. Hopefully, we will be carrying it soon.

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Long time reader, first time poster.  I'm not a brewnewb, but with only about seven batches under my belt I am by no means seasoned either.  I'm looking at picking this recipe up because it sounds so damned tasty.  But to my inexperienced eyes it seems like a LOT of malt for the LBK.  Should I assume that keeping the fermentation temperature at the recommended low end - 65 degrees - is critical in order to keep this from rabidly foaming out of the lid?

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2 hours ago, Shrike said:

Long time reader, first time poster.  I'm not a brewnewb, but with only about seven batches under my belt I am by no means seasoned either.  I'm looking at picking this recipe up because it sounds so damned tasty.  But to my inexperienced eyes it seems like a LOT of malt for the LBK.  Should I assume that keeping the fermentation temperature at the recommended low end - 65 degrees - is critical in order to keep this from rabidly foaming out of the lid?

 

Yes. When there is a lot of malt, you could easily blow the lid off. Ferment on the lower end of the yeast range. Did the same with the Novacaine I just brewed. Fermented at 65 degrees, took 3 weeks to ferment. Cold crashing now. You may want to add some yeast nutrient as well, since this brew has a higher ABV.  

 

@Josh R Any chance of getting the image/logo used on that glass in the image? I would like to apply it to my labels after I have this bottled. :)

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Notty can go lower even.  Low 60s is fine. No yeast nutrient is needed.

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14 hours ago, Shrike said:

Long time reader, first time poster.  I'm not a brewnewb, but with only about seven batches under my belt I am by no means seasoned either.  I'm looking at picking this recipe up because it sounds so damned tasty.  But to my inexperienced eyes it seems like a LOT of malt for the LBK.  Should I assume that keeping the fermentation temperature at the recommended low end - 65 degrees - is critical in order to keep this from rabidly foaming out of the lid?

The Imperial Stout that I referenced earlier in this thread was brewed using 2 St Pat's HMEs, 1 lb of Amber DME, and a cup of dark brown sugar.  Used Safale US-04 yeast and fermented at temps in the low 60s.  I also took the precaution of loosening the lid on the LBK just a touch.  With all that malt, there was a constant trickle of overflow for the first week or so of fermentation but, thankfully, nothing major.  A low fermenting temperature is a must for a beast like this.  Kept the LBK in a sturdy container with a towel to soak up the overflow and there was no real mess.  Don't let the amount of malt in this recipe keep you from giving it a try if you'd really like to experience the beer!

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On ‎8‎/‎19‎/‎2016 at 9:29 AM, RickBeer said:

Wait, you ate ashtray contents?  #NotSurprised #ExplainsALot

one Christmas I ate a whole Christmas bulb, it was red, my mother said I was an apple freak at the age of one. I dnt remember any of that! but of course that was an era a parent wasn't accused of child neglect/abuse, etc usually it was the stupidity of the child! i'm happy to say I was raised properly!!

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On 8/12/2016 at 10:47 PM, MichaelL said:

  However, I hope some of our intrepid Forum members attempt this beast and share their results with us.  

 

Just ordered and its in the mail. Will definitely posts pics and a review once it is complete. Will be a year from now. Cold crashing a LBK of Novacaine to bottle tomorrow. Will let that one age a year as well. Next year is looking to be a good year. :)

 

On 8/12/2016 at 11:59 PM, K5WX said:

  Does the kit include towels for cleaning up when the LBK overflows during high Krausen?!! 

 

Not needed actually. Ferment at the lower end of the yeast and you wont have any issues. Just did a LBK of Novacaine, which uses 3 cans of HME and didnt have a single issue. It did bubble like crazy for the first two weeks though. Took 3 weeks to complete fermentation at a constant 65 degrees. 

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I started soaking the oak chips 2wks ago, which means that they'll be soaking for a total of 4wks.  Will this negatively impact the final product?  Thanks in advance. :)

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3 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I started soaking the oak chips 2wks ago, which means that they'll be soaking for a total of 4wks.  Will this negatively impact the final product?  Thanks in advance. :)

I still have oak chips soaking in bulliet whiskey, vanilla and cherry extract since spring of 2015!!! I opened the jar last weekend to get a whif!, yum!, may have to re-energize the whiskey part. so I think you should be ok!

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4 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I started soaking the oak chips 2wks ago, which means that they'll be soaking for a total of 4wks.  Will this negatively impact the final product?  Thanks in advance. :)

 

No. The oak can only soak up so much. After about 3 weeks, the chips will be done soaking. Soaking for longer won't hurt, but it won't improve the chips either. Remember to use an airtight container when soaking so the liquor doesn't evaporate.

 

1 hour ago, HoppySmile! said:

I still have oak chips soaking in bulliet whiskey, vanilla and cherry extract since spring of 2015!!! I opened the jar last weekend to get a whif!, yum!, may have to re-energize the whiskey part. so I think you should be ok!

 

You are just wasting whiskey, Hoppy. It takes 3 weeks to soak the chips. Anything left after that will eventually evaporate away. 

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3 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

No. The oak can only soak up so much. After about 3 weeks, the chips will be done soaking. Soaking for longer won't hurt, but it won't improve the chips either. Remember to use an airtight container when soaking so the liquor doesn't evaporate.

 

 

You are just wasting whiskey, Hoppy. It takes 3 weeks to soak the chips. Anything left after that will eventually evaporate away. 

oh I didn't waste any whiskey, the rest went into my belly!

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Just now, HoppySmile! said:

oh I didn't waste any whiskey, the rest went into my belly!


I was referring to adding more to the chips. If you already soaked them, they won't get anymore soaked. It would be a waste of whiskey. Instead of adding more, drink it. The chips already have whiskey in them. ;)

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those oak chips, maybe 10 pieces just sitting sealed in a jar , I may throw on the grill for smoking effect one of these days when i'm drunk

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6 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

No. The oak can only soak up so much. After about 3 weeks, the chips will be done soaking. Soaking for longer won't hurt, but it won't improve the chips either. Remember to use an airtight container when soaking so the liquor doesn't evaporate.

 

 

You are just wasting whiskey, Hoppy. It takes 3 weeks to soak the chips. Anything left after that will eventually evaporate away. 

Thanks, Josh.  I wasn't sure if it would have a negative impact on taste.  I'll end up putting them into the LBK after they've already soaked for 4wks.  I kinda jumped the gun this recipe. 

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Why a year?  I will start cracking these at six months.  Of course at one a week the last one might make it to a year.

I decided to do a double batch (36ish bottles), so I could steep all the grains in one go.  I'm also just combining one stout and one liquid extract per batch, so I won't have the blow off, even if fermenting happens at the high end of the range.  Based on previous experience, I will have no problems with the body I will get out of this.

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Imperial Aged Stout. Suggested conditioning time it 6-9 months. So if it is good at 6 months, great at 9 months, I'm guessing it should be mind blowing at a year. :)  

 

Not gonna lie, I will probably crack one open at 6 months. :D

 

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My wife can finally stop asking about the wood chips soaking in something in a mason jar on the counter.  I dumped the works in the LBK today. ?

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On 9/6/2016 at 1:55 AM, TacTicToe said:

Got my wood chips soaking now. Waiting a year for this to condition is gonna be tough! :)

Same here.  Got the package delivered today and got the chips soaking immediately.  So two weeks to soak, three weeks in the LBK, minimum of six months bottle conditioning...this is definitely a test of patience! :)

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I have this fermenting in my cooler.  If I was to rate this on odor alone, I'd give it a 10/10.  Best smelling Mr. Beer recipe that I've ever had the pleasure of sniffing!  I did follow Josh's advice and added that 3rd St. Pats.  Man, I just need to get this one out of my head and leave it alone! 

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On 9/14/2016 at 11:59 AM, AnthonyC said:

I have this fermenting in my cooler.  If I was to rate this on odor alone, I'd give it a 10/10.  Best smelling Mr. Beer recipe that I've ever had the pleasure of sniffing!  I did follow Josh's advice and added that 3rd St. Pats.  Man, I just need to get this one out of my head and leave it alone! 

 

Did you also add a 4th Smooth LME or just a 3rd HME? 

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7 hours ago, TacTicToe said:

 

Did you also add a 4th Smooth LME or just a 3rd HME? 

In 1 of the recipes I added an extra 1lb of dme, but I added 3 cans of hme to both.  I got them for $5 a can from Walmart back in January.  Both recipes had 3lbs of smooth lme. :)

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On 9/17/2016 at 0:07 PM, Bonsai & Brew said:

Bottled this morning -- now all I can do is wait till St. Patty's Day 2017.:)

Think I'm going to let mine ride the entire 12months.  I'm not sure how I'm going to do this, but that's the plan.

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1 hour ago, AnthonyC said:

Think I'm going to let mine ride the entire 12months.  I'm not sure how I'm going to do this, but that's the plan.

 

You could always help kickstart my idea for a home Beer Security System!:)

 

image.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

You could always help kickstart my idea for a home Beer Security System!:)

 

image.jpeg

 

This guy should be punished for putting beer in the door of the fridge. Never put beer in the door. It gets shaken up each time you open the refrigerator. lol

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5 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

You could always help kickstart my idea for a home Beer Security System!:)

 

image.jpeg

Is it Hoppy proof??

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I finally got this one in the LBK today.  It's my first partial mash brew so I was a little apprehensive, but aside from a minor slippage which spilled about 1/4 cup of wort down the side of the LBK, things went smoothly.  Now the LBK is in a cooler with a couple of bottles of ice, right at 65 degrees.  I'm looking forward to seeing how it turns out...in mid-2017.

Now I need to see what I can brew with the unused grain...

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I just put in the bourbon and chips and wow, does this thing smell great! 

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I just finished bottling it.  It tastes great; malty, complex, heavy but without coming across as thick, and with a definite kick.

 

Now they're resting in my old NewAir wine fridge.  I bought it a few years ago to use as a humidor but recently upgraded.  I was wondering what to do with it when inspiration struck.  16 1/2 liter PET bottles fit perfectly in the bottom.  So now they'll sit there at a steady 65 degrees.  Until April.  -sigh-  I...uh...imagine as the brewer that it's my responsibility to do a periodic quality control check, so maybe February.  B)

 

 

 

30302675671_af79ed506a_z.jpg

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1 hour ago, Shrike said:

 I...uh...imagine as the brewer that it's my responsibility to do a periodic quality control check, so maybe February

I do a quality taste check every other day, probably y I have to brew so much!!! let us know how it turns out!!!

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On ‎9‎/‎19‎/‎2016 at 11:45 AM, AnthonyC said:

Is it Hoppy proof??

with my newly unwanted acquired roommate, i'm already biting nails that he'll wipe out my 5 cases I've bottled recently, so instead of a high dollar security system for my beer, I go and buy a 30 pack of cheap 6 pt twice a week, and leave it on the back porch til the monster emeres

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45 minutes ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

4 months, 14 days, 16 hours.

 

Waiting...??????

That's all you have to wait?!?!  Mine won't be ready until October... You lucky bastard!!!

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44 minutes ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

4 months, 14 days, 16 hours.

 

Waiting...??????

 

I'm going to pop one open to sample on St. Patrick's Day.  It'll have been in the bottle for five months at that time.  I just can't let that day go by without trying one. :)

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You guys just made me realize where all of my Saint Pat's Stout HME's went.  I forgot that I threw three of them into the LBK. 

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6 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

That's all you have to wait?!?!  Mine won't be ready until October... You lucky bastard!!!

 

Sorry, that's how long since brew day, haha.

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7 minutes ago, Shrike said:

 

I'm going to pop one open to sample on St. Patrick's Day.  It'll have been in the bottle for five months at that time.  I just can't let that day go by without trying one. :)

 

Me too.;)

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I gave out bottles of Lock, Stock, and Barrel to all of the MRB employees during our annual holiday party. We also drank some on tap from the same keg that held the beer + oak cubes soaked with Bulliet bourbon for 6 months. This is probably my #1 favorite MRB recipe so far. Yeah, it takes a long time, but it's so worth it in the end. And don't let the price deter you. It's actually our cheapest recipe when compared to commercially available bourbon barrel aged Imperial stouts sold at beer stores for $20 + per bottle (24oz).

 

15094301_10210199151831697_3429748873010

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

I gave out bottles of Lock, Stock, and Barrel to all of the MRB employees during our annual holiday party. We also drank some on tap from the same keg that held the beer + oak cubes soaked with Bulliet bourbon for 6 months. This is probably my #1 favorite MRB recipe so far. Yeah, it takes a long time, but it's so worth it in the end. And don't let the price deter you. It's actually our cheapest recipe when compared to commercially available bourbon barrel aged Imperial stouts sold at beer stores for $20 + per bottle (24oz).

So, since I didn't get an invitation to there party, feel free to mail my complimentary bottle as soon as you see fit, Josh :rolleyes:

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

I gave out bottles of Lock, Stock, and Barrel to all of the MRB employees during our annual holiday party. We also drank some on tap from the same keg that held the beer + oak cubes soaked with Bulliet bourbon for 6 months. This is probably my #1 favorite MRB recipe so far. Yeah, it takes a long time, but it's so worth it in the end. And don't let the price deter you. It's actually our cheapest recipe when compared to commercially available bourbon barrel aged Imperial stouts sold at beer stores for $20 + per bottle (24oz).

 

15094301_10210199151831697_3429748873010

 

In Louisville, they are a wee bit cheaper than that, but I guess it's because we have the bourbon somewhat more local.  More than the stout, I like the local Bourbon Cask Ales.  I'm going to have to experiment one day on how to change the stout to an ale.

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Just now, MiniYoda said:

 

In Louisville, they are a wee bit cheaper than that, but I guess it's because we have the bourbon somewhat more local.  More than the stout, I like the local Bourbon Cask Ales.  I'm going to have to experiment one day on how to change the stout to an ale.

 

Stouts ARE ales. lol

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Stouts ARE ales. lol

 

Yes, but not all ales are stouts.  For the recipe, I'd like to try the American Ale HME instead of the St. Patrick's Stout.  Just wondering if all the other components like the Smooth LME would be the same

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1 hour ago, MiniYoda said:

 

Yes, but not all ales are stouts.  For the recipe, I'd like to try the American Ale HME instead of the St. Patrick's Stout.  Just wondering if all the other components like the Smooth LME would be the same

 

They can be the same. Or you can use Pale or Golden LME. For lighter-bodied/colored bourbon barrel aged beers, you get more of the wood and bourbon flavor than in imp stouts. I've had some AMAZING brandy barrel aged barleywines before so you don't even need to use bourbon either. 

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I'm real excited to try this one once I get my LBK free of what's in it. Currently debating whether I want to take my chances with using Lagavulin and make this a smokey stout, or just pick up a new bottle of Booker's...

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15 hours ago, yawgeh said:

I'm real excited to try this one once I get my LBK free of what's in it. Currently debating whether I want to take my chances with using Lagavulin and make this a smokey stout, or just pick up a new bottle of Booker's...

 

That's a damn good idea! Lagavulin is SO good. It would be amazing in this beer, I think.

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Sounds great, but I have to say what I've always said about Novacaine...  $60 is a bit above what I'm willing to spend for a 2 gallon recipe.  That all being said, I'll be anxious to hear the reviews.

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I made my own Bourbon Barrel before this recipe came out (shucks!). I used the St. Patty HME as my base then added some black malt, caramel 60, 1 booster, 2 robust LME's, 10 oz of Maker's, oak chips, 1/2 cup brown sugar.

 

Result?

 

 

IMG_20161231_153156_876.jpg

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 2:14 PM, MRB Josh R said:

 

They can be the same. Or you can use Pale or Golden LME. For lighter-bodied/colored bourbon barrel aged beers, you get more of the wood and bourbon flavor than in imp stouts. I've had some AMAZING brandy barrel aged barleywines before so you don't even need to use bourbon either. 

 

I think I'm going to try this!

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4 hours ago, swenocha said:

Sounds great, but I have to say what I've always said about Novacaine...  $60 is a bit above what I'm willing to spend for a 2 gallon recipe.  That all being said, I'll be anxious to hear the reviews.

 

Novocaine is on my "to buy" list.  I don't mind spending that much when the final product is such high ABV that it's practically wine-strength.  I'll bottle in 12oz bottles, of which I expect to get 22 bottles.  That's $2.73/bottle for a beer that's damned near 11% ABV.  I'm fine with that.

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 7:49 AM, AnthonyC said:

You guys just made me realize where all of my Saint Pat's Stout HME's went.  I forgot that I threw three of them into the LBK. 

you threw all 3 cans? wouldn't that give a metallic flavor?

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38 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

you threw all 3 cans? wouldn't that give a metallic flavor?

I did it for the iron, Hoppy.  ?

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 2:14 PM, MRB Josh R said:

 

They can be the same. Or you can use Pale or Golden LME. For lighter-bodied/colored bourbon barrel aged beers, you get more of the wood and bourbon flavor than in imp stouts. I've had some AMAZING brandy barrel