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fathead5f

Lock stock stout

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Hey all, 

   Getting ready to brew the lock stock and barrel stout and was thinking about a way to add a slightly smokey flavor to it. Any suggestions?

 

Thank you and Happy Thanksgiving

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I've not used it yet, but an ounce or two of Briess Smoked Cherrywood Malt would be nice I'd think.  Smokin' Oak Stout??

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I'll have to look into it. This recipe gets bourbon oak chips added. But was thing a slight smokey taste along with the bourbon wood flavor might be nice. 

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If you have a grill or smoker you could try giving the oak chips a cold smoke for a little while.  I'd err on the side of caution, though, as to how long to smoke them.  It's better to be drinking the beer and thinking "Mmm, that's got a nice, subtle hint of smoke" instead of "Damn, the smoke is overpowering."

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They do make a Liquid Smoke that you can buy at the grocery store, spice/baking isle.  But I'd like the senior brewmasters to chime in before you do this.  Seems like someone posted that they might be vinegar based.  I have no idea.  Perhaps do a search on this forum for liquid smoke (I would, but I'm late for work)

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You can also lightly smoke your grains. Smoke the 2-row and Munich over some good wood (beechwood, cherrywood, mesquite, etc). Or just buy some pre-smoked 2-row and replace the 2-row in the recipe with it. Peated malt works well, too, but can get a bit overwhelming (use no more than 1 oz peated malt). I wouldn't recommend liquid smoke. It can make the beer taste a bit medicinal.

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I think what you're trying to achieve sounds great.  I've used the Smoked Cherrywood grains a few times and I  found them to be much milder than I expected.  I will say this though...  When a beer says brewed with "    ", I REALLY REALLY want to taste it. 

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Sorry to bring this thread back to life, but I'm researching smoked beers.

 

I'm toying with a recipe that would include subtle smoke and wood flavoring.  I like the method of Lock, Stock, and Barrel Stout, but was thinking in my head to replace the bourbon with a mixture of water and Brewer's Best Smoke Flavoring

 

http://www.homebrewing.org/Natural-Smoke-Flavoring-Extract-4-oz_p_6260.html

 

Thoughts?

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31 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

Sorry to bring this thread back to life, but I'm researching smoked beers.

 

I'm toying with a recipe that would include subtle smoke and wood flavoring.  I like the method of Lock, Stock, and Barrel Stout, but was thinking in my head to replace the bourbon with a mixture of water and Brewer's Best Smoke Flavoring

 

http://www.homebrewing.org/Natural-Smoke-Flavoring-Extract-4-oz_p_6260.html

 

Thoughts?

Hey miniyoda. First let me tell you that this might be one if not the best beer I've brewed. Here's what I did.  I used High West Rye Whiskey and soaked the chips for almost 2 weeks before adding them. I also replaced the 2 row Munich with a smoked  version from my local brewery shop.   I've recently read that about 3 or 4 days before you should put the oak chips in the freezer and take them out the day before putting them in. This will pull the whiskey out of the chips thus giving more of that oak flavor, I have not tried it last, but definitely will the next batch I make. This really is a great beer.

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Thanks for the suggestion @fathead5f, but not quite the direction I wanted to go.  I'm not making a bourbon/whiskey based beer.  I'm going in a different direction, and while I'm thinking/planning/idea-ing, I'm wondering how it would be to soak the oak chips in water with smoke flavoring, then go from there.  I'll explain more next week, once I have more plans, but just wondering if this is a decent way to add smoke flavoring to a beer

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1 hour ago, MiniYoda said:

Thanks for the suggestion @fathead5f, but not quite the direction I wanted to go.  I'm not making a bourbon/whiskey based beer.  I'm going in a different direction, and while I'm thinking/planning/idea-ing, I'm wondering how it would be to soak the oak chips in water with smoke flavoring, then go from there.  I'll explain more next week, once I have more plans, but just wondering if this is a decent way to add smoke flavoring to a beer

 

It will work, but it's not really a great way to add smoke. The best way to add smoke is with actual smoke. Just get some wood (cherrywood, maple, apple, or beechwood are the best, just be sure whatever wood you use hasn't been treated) and use it to smoke your specialty grains (or the wood chips) for a few minutes. There are many techniques for smoking grains that can be found with an online search. It's no more difficult than soaking your wood chips in water, and it is much better than liquid smoke, which can tend to create unwanted phenolic flavors (think burnt band-aid flavors).

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strongly considering the "smoke your own grains", and also buying smoked grains.  The second option is out, and I'll explain why next week.  Smoke your own might be a challenge for me, living in an apartment with smoke detectors :P, but I'm sure I can find a friend with a back yard to do it in

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