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BigSteve

I'm a little rusty

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Made a few batches without any problems, then took about a year off.  Today I started a Diablo IPA.  I sprinkled the yeast in after following the directions closely, just as I've always done.  But then...nothing.  Memory tells me the wort foams up in the keg big time after an hour or two.  But it's been about 5 hours and nothing.  Will it still happen, or did I have bad yeast or something?  Thanks.

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I had very little foam on a batch of Northwest Pale Ale but I did see trub after a few weeks.  I just bottled it and it tasted fine.

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Don't sweat it.  I put a batch in the LBK on Tuesday and it was quiet for almost two days, then suddenly there was foam a-plenty.  Yeast will sometimes take off like a rocket and other times there will be little visual indication that they're working their magic.

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It's been about 8 or 9 hours, and I can see some foam just starting.  It just seemed to me that in other batches it was much more dramatic after only a couple of hours.  But it looks like it's starting.  Thanks for the info, and Happy New Year.

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Hang in there, BigSteve.  It's gonna happen...  most likely.  Some of my best recipes showed very little action. 

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my Diablo I did three weeks ago was quiet for the first day then worked its magic,, cold crashing it today ,,sample tasted good...

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Some brews just take off, others start slowly. Either way, turtle or hare, they eventually finish. The "lag" period before can be influenced by many things, such as how oxygenated the wort was, temperature, yeast cell count, specific gravity of the sugars in the wort, variety of yeast, dry vs liquid yeast, to mention a few. Commercial brewers have tight control over these things, and with experience and consistent method you'll see the same results for beers of the same recipe. Of course there is always the "what the heck happened  factor" that can't be easily explained. 

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Here's a great tip.  STOP LOOKING.

 

is that why i'm crossed eye?

 

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6 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Here's a great tip.  STOP LOOKING.

LOL.   If it was only that easy :)  Just over 7 years since I started brewing and I still find myself doing it.   I've been told by a couple friends that work at breweries to "Trust the process".  By this they mean that as long as you do everything you do right, you can trust it will do what it needs to.  I trust my system and my experience to know that I will hit my #'s, be that temps or mash conversation,  volume into the BK or hop boil times and when I do, I know I will have some dang good beer when its all said and done.  However, I still get curious, all these batches later, when I don't see any visual signs of fermentation 24 hours after pitching the yeast and I just cant help myself to check up on it... once I do, the only thing I really monitor after that is the temperature, which I will look at the thermo strip 1x/day on the side of the conical to see what it's doing during fermentation and to see if I need to turn the heat or a/c on in the garage.  Watching the temperature is also a good way to see when active fermentation really takes off, as well as when it is finishing up as your temperature will rise, then fall, and it will be noticeable (my latest batch, 22 gallons of a double IPA, had a 6* swing).  However, if its making you crazy by looking so much, and I remember how I was with my first several batches.... "Trust The Process" :)

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6 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

is that why i'm crossed eye?

 

 

Not conclusively,  Many of the other things you've done to your body may be the cause.  Only an extensive autopsy will determine that...

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w

12 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Only an extensive autopsy will determine that...

what's autotopsy?

 

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20 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

w

what's autotopsy?

 

 

An autopsy—also known as a post-mortem examination, necropsy, or autopsia cadaverum —is a highly specialized surgical procedure that consists of a thorough examination of a corpse by dissection to determine the cause and manner of death and to evaluate any disease or injury that may be present. It is usually performed by a specialized medical doctor called a pathologist.

Autopsies are performed for either legal or medical purposes. For example, a forensic autopsy is carried out when the cause of death may be a criminal matter, while a clinical or academic autopsy is performed to find the medical cause of death and is used in cases of unknown or uncertain death, or for research purposes. Autopsies can be further classified into cases where external examination suffices, and those where the body is dissected and internal examination is conducted. Permission from next of kin may be required for internal autopsy in some cases. Once an internal autopsy is complete the body is reconstituted by sewing it back together.

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21 hours ago, Ron Howard Dawson said:

Hoppy, did you ever put that small keg inside your dog?

no, but I did sleep in a Holiday Inn last night....................

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