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Kwazi

Bottling

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Probably a dumb question but will ask any way. I made the Irish stout and the package says use 2 and 1/2 teaspoons of sugar. I will be using the 740 ml to bottle. I saw on the instructions that came with the kit that you use 2 teaspoons for the 740 ml bottles. Which instructions do I follow, I am bottling tomorrow. 

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8 minutes ago, Kwazi said:

Probably a dumb question but will ask any way. I made the Irish stout and the package says use 2 and 1/2 teaspoons of sugar. I will be using the 740 ml to bottle. I saw on the instructions that came with the kit that you use 2 teaspoons for the 740 ml bottles. Which instructions do I follow, I am bottling tomorrow. 

2 tsp however, most people find that the recommended amount is a but too much. Especially for a stout id back it off a bit

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this probably isn't gonna answer your question but with stouts I carb them lower then my ales... I batch prime when I carb,, with my ales I use about 48 grams of sugar with my stouts I go like 36 grams of sugar ,, most people find the Mr beer instructions for carbing to he a little high,,,sooo two per bottle is prob just fine for ya.... There's calculators out there to help ya,, ...

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http://www.northernbrewer.com/priming-sugar-calculator

here's a link to a priming calculator.... batch priming is the way to go... when your ready for that step... 1 nd a half you should be fine ,, its a preference thing ,, I like bubbly beer some people not so much,, but with batch priming you'll insure all your beers are evenly carbed to whatever level you like .... good luck!!!

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28 minutes ago, Kwazi said:

Probably a dumb question

theres no dumb questions,, ask away .....someone here will have an answer....

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Thanks for the info. So I'm assuming batch priming is when you do the whole batch at once instead of by the bottle?

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If you're bottle priming, you have the ability to figure out the answer to the question yourself.  What I mean is - the proper level of carbonation for YOUR Irish Stout is what YOU determine it to be.  So, take a few bottles and put in X sugar.  Then, take a few other bottles and put in Y sugar.  And the remaining bottles and put in Z sugar.  Make sure to mark them,   

 

For a real test, do this blind (i.e. have someone else mark them and you not know what the mark means), and then compare them side by side.  

 

The calculators allow you to properly carbonate for STYLE, as noted.  A Stout, as noted, should be less carbonated than other styles.

 

Batch priming is the same level for all the bottles, because you add it to a priming container and put the beer in that, therefore every bottle is the same.  A new brewer should NOT be doing batch priming.

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Thanks for all the info guys. I am doing this for the first time. 

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On 1/14/2017 at 10:04 AM, RickBeer said:

A new brewer should NOT be doing batch priming.

 

Now, now.  I have a sugar measure that I ordered from Mr. Beer that is very unused and lonely on the shelf in my basement.  Batch priming from the get-go and I wouldn't do it any other way.

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8 minutes ago, C-ya said:

 

Now, now.  I have a sugar measure that I ordered from Mr. Beer that is very unused and lonely on the shelf in my basement.  Batch priming from the get-go and I wouldn't do it any other way.

I think I was about four batches in when i finally batched primed,,afterwards I was like,whyyyy wasn't I doing this the whole time!!!! So much easier.....

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10 minutes ago, C-ya said:

 

Now, now.  I have a sugar measure that I ordered from Mr. Beer that is very unused and lonely on the shelf in my basement.  Batch priming from the get-go and I wouldn't do it any other way.

I agree. Im sorry that i probably would butt heads with a lot of people on this forum about this but so be it. I wish someone wouldve told me to go bigger. Its like, you learn to bottle, then you learn a better way to bottle. Why cant you just start doing things the better way first? So what if you screw it up? You double your chances of screwing it up learning to do it two different ways anyway. And you can say newbs arent educated enough to do certain things right on their own. But mistakes is how i learned how to do things the right way and the point is driven home hard.

 

I think less people would quit if they started with partial mashes too. The beer is undeniably better. Thank God i didnt give up after my CAL cider from fermenting too high.

 

Do some reading, be sanitary, and follow the instructions and anyone should be able to do anything in the home brewing world. 

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The more complicated the process, the more mistakes get made.  The more mistakes get made, the worse the outcome.  The worse the outcome, the more people quit.

 

Imagine this message in the instructions:

 

Thanks for buying.  Call us up and buy another LBK, with shipping, and wait for it to come before you bottle.  And some hose too.

 

Number of buyers that end up on the forum is single digit percentage.

 

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1.5tsp has been the magic spot for me with the 740mL.  Only time that I had over-carbonation with that amount was when I made an Abbey Dubbel.

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