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Nickfixit

Ballast Point Braewery "Home Work Series" Recipes

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This is rather interesting. They make and sell this series of 8 beers and also provide the recipe and hints for Home Brewing them.

Has anyone made any of these?

https://www.ballastpoint.com/beers/homework-series/

 

I have not looked in depth but maybe there is some possible Mr Beer HME collaboration recipe series we could look at. 

Even if Mr B is not involved directly, if we like the Ballast Point beers, maybe we could use their recipe as a guide for an HME based version.

Of course, Mr B official suggestions would be very welcome.

 

They also include a variety of other homebrew recipes

And very comprehensive instructions.

 

https://www.ballastpoint.com/beer-recipes/

 

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15 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

This is rather interesting. They make and sell this series of 8 beers and also provide the recipe and hints for Home Brewing them.

Has anyone made any of these?

https://www.ballastpoint.com/beers/homework-series/

 

I have not looked in depth but maybe there is some possible Mr Beer HME collaboration recipe series we could look at. 

Even if Mr B is not involved directly, if we like the Ballast Point beers, maybe we could use their recipe as a guide for an HME based version.

Of course, Mr B official suggestions would be very welcome.

 

They also include a variety of other homebrew recipes

 

https://www.ballastpoint.com/beer-recipes/

 

Gonna try that saison for sure

 

maybe the Belgian ipa too. Some i dont like but some i freaking love. Ill suppose im in control so i can tweak it all I want 

 

nice find there young man

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I just noticed I can't spell Brewery. Oh well. Better I notice first (if someone else did, thanks for keeping quiet :-))   - sorry folks!

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I've had a couple of the beers and kept the recipe after I drank it. I thought it would be interesting to buy one, brew the recipe and compare.

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18 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

I just noticed I can't spell Brewery. Oh well. Better I notice first (if someone else did, thanks for keeping quiet :-))   - sorry folks!

 

Starting happy hour a little early are we?

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5 minutes ago, Bach's Brews said:

 

Starting happy hour a little early are we?

I am always happy - no matter what the distance from the fridge :-)

 

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Had to look it up, first time hearing of it: 

The final step in the brewing process is the “knock out”. During this step, hot wort is chilled to room temperature through a heat exchanger, and oxygen is added in-line while the wort is transferred to the fermenter. Yeast is added to the wort in the fermenter to begin the fermentation process.

BLUF: it's cooling to the specified pitching temp, but I'm not quite sure what a homebrewer would use to add oxygen in-line. 

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20 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Had to look it up, first time hearing of it: 

The final step in the brewing process is the “knock out”. During this step, hot wort is chilled to room temperature through a heat exchanger, and oxygen is added in-line while the wort is transferred to the fermenter. Yeast is added to the wort in the fermenter to begin the fermentation process.

BLUF: it's cooling to the specified pitching temp, but I'm not quite sure what a homebrewer would use to add oxygen in-line. 

So basically you start at 60° and and end at 60°?  Why can't they just say pitch and ferment at 60°?

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7 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

So basically you start at 60° and and end at 60°?  Why can't they just say pitch and ferment at 60°?

I guess it's just a fancy way of saying the same thing? I really think it hinges upon the oxygen addition, to which would require more research. Do all of the homework recipes use the knockout term?

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7 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I guess it's just a fancy way of saying the same thing? I really think it hinges upon the oxygen addition, to which would require more research. Do all of the homework recipes use the knockout term?

Looks like just this one and the saison. F it, im brewing it and ignoring the knock out term

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11 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Looks like just this one and the saison. F it, im brewing it and ignoring the knock out term

Have you ever seen/heard of something that adds oxygen in-line, as far as in homebrewing? 

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3 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Have you ever seen/heard of something that adds oxygen in-line, as far as in homebrewing? 

Sure, in high abv beers some people add oxygen for once a day for three days. They shoot it through the sample port i think? Not too sure

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12 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Sure, in high abv beers some people add oxygen for once a day for three days. They shoot it through the sample port i think? Not too sure

Get a small bottle of Oxygen, a small tube that connects to the adapter you need for the bottle, on the other end of the line is a small metal rod that connects to a diffuser stone.  Depending on what you are making, a few short blasts is all you need.  Easy peezy!  I shoot mine only once, and it's through the top of the conical before I pitch the yeast.  I haven't developed an "in-line" system yet, but I have got to use one at a big brewery (HI-FI Brewing, Redmond, WA) and I think it would be major overkill for a home system.... then again, why would that stop me from figuring it out? :)

 

 

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1 hour ago, kedogn said:

Get a small bottle of Oxygen, a small tube that connects to the adapter you need for the bottle, on the other end of the line is a small metal rod that connects to a diffuser stone.  Depending on what you are making, a few short blasts is all you need.  Easy peezy!  I shoot mine only once, and it's through the top of the conical before I pitch the yeast.  I haven't developed an "in-line" system yet, but I have got to use one at a big brewery (HI-FI Brewing, Redmond, WA) and I think it would be major overkill for a home system.... then again, why would that stop me from figuring it out? :)

 

 

Seems legit. So is the main benefit promoting yeast viability?

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Yeast growth occurs in 4 stages (lag, exponential, stationary, and decline) .  The lag phase occurs 3 - 15 hours after pitching the yeast.  The yeast utilize the oxygen in that phase, rapidly absorbing it from the wort to use in later growth stages.  That is why you want oxygen added before pitching the yeast, so it gets used during the lag phase.  Vigorous use of a nylon whisk is usually sufficient for a homebrewer.  

 

With high gravity wort, there is additional benefit provided by adding oxygen between 10 to 14 hours after pitching.  After that point, any oxygen added will be detrimental, not beneficial. 

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3 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

Seems legit. So is the main benefit promoting yeast viability?

Yes.  Between this and a really good yeast starter, your yeasties will be VERY happy and work their little butts off for you to make you some great beer.  The best part is, that BOTH of these things are so easy to do and don't really cost much $$, considering what you will get in return. :)

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