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Creeps McLane

One brew split, two yeasts

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Im trying to brainstorm different styles which are similar enough where i can brew a big batch and split them post boil and make them different beers using different yeast strains. Preferably ales. Im thinking i could do this with:

 

American/ irish stout 

barleywine / strong ale

pale ale / saison

belgian pale / saison

bitter / esb

american / english porter

 

any thoughts? 

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Seems pretty spot-on @Creeps McLane. It sounds like an interesting experiment. How wide are you looking to vary the yeast strains? 

The best I've done is in creating a faux-steam beer, using 34/70 lager yeast (instead of San Fran Steam) at ale temps; it's still conditioning and rings in at over 9%. 

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13 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Seems pretty spot-on @Creeps McLane. It sounds like an interesting experiment. How wide are you looking to vary the yeast strains? 

The best I've done is in creating a faux-steam beer, using 34/70 lager yeast (instead of San Fran Steam) at ale temps; it's still conditioning and rings in at over 9%. 

The goal would be to make two totally different tasting beers. Which is why when i set out to do this originally i said id do pale ale and saison. 

 

I have been seeing a few lager strains that do quite well at ale temps which interests me. However, I'd probably go American light lager and american ale which seems pretty dull to me.

 

i can only handle one dry strain and one liquid ideally right now. But with smack packs being some easy to get my possibilities are almost limitless. 

 

Im not looking to stay "true to style". I am not a cicerone, i am a beer drinker. I will not taste if my english porter is all American grain. Know what i mean?

 

ps brew day is friday. No rush guys

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1 hour ago, Creeps McLane said:

I suppose i could do a California steam / saison or American ale / saison eh?

Sounds like a plan to me. I'd try the American Ale/saison, as you're looking at similar SRMs. I know you mentioned not worrying about being true to style, but most Cali Steams end up more Amber-ish. 

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unless you are using radically different yeasts and playing with temperature variations, you wont likely taste much difference.  an ale fermented with US04 tastes literally identical to a US05 unless you hike the temps up.  then the 05 stays clean with maybe a little green apple, while the 04 makes fruit juice.

 

a saison yeast at standard ale temps will do the same job with only slight esters maybe.... but jack up the temp on them to 87f and the saison yeast make all manner of complex fruity/spicy/peppery/floral esters. 

 

a Belgian pale and a saison would be similar enough but use different yeast. try Belgian Ardennes in the pale and danstar belle saison in the other. ferment both on the hotter side of their optimal fermentation temp and see how both come out.

 

bitters and esb are basically the same ale at differing strengths.

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Well to get really different maybe use the Belle Saison warm, and then the S-05 cool. I think that would be even more different than 2 Belgian yeasts.

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Ok so heres the plan. An american ale and saison. Well... actually i was thinking about finially using the k-97 dry yeast for the american ale so that may make it more of a kolsch or something. But anyway heres the skinny. 

 

Approx, im not rounding

44% 2 row

44% pilsen

4% wheat

4% flaked corn

2% honey malt

 

Mt hood at 60

Amarillo at 12

el dorado at 10

 

Ill step mash at 145 and then 152 and then mash out

 

the American ale will be dry hopped with all the above hops, saison will be untouched. 

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remember with Pilsen to do a longer boil. Pilsen tends to form a lot of DMS.  never used mt hood but Amarillo plays nicely with dorado.

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20 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

remember with Pilsen to do a longer boil. Pilsen tends to form a lot of DMS.  never used mt hood but Amarillo plays nicely with dorado.

Upon reading this I did a little research on what you said and I thank you for the advice. I will up it to a 90 min boil and hope I don't regret the flaked corn in the grain bill. Especially since I said screw the two row and doubled the Pilsen. Ive heard a lot of brewery's on the brewing network bring in beer that's 100% pilsner so I was scared of it. Now I am a little bit

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only really applies to all grain. Pilsen produces a lot of dms or dms precursors that need a vigorous boil to drive off.  I think dms can make beer taste like cabbage or 'creamed corn' some say.. kinda skunky. nothing wrong with almost all or all  Pilsen.. just do the longer boil.   nothing wrong with corn additives too .  http://homebrew.stackexchange.com/questions/9270/what-effect-does-adding-flaked-corn-to-a-recipe-have  is a discussion on another forum on this very thing.

 

I'm not a fan of 100% Pilsen because I don't find the flavor all that interesting.  I like blending Pilsen with wheat and a little munich.  maybe a 40/40/20 percent blend? or 50/40/10.  that's just my preference.

 

oh and re the yeasts...  yep. o4 or o5 vs a Belgian would be a better experiment than two Belgians.

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