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MrWhy

5 Gallon Batches - Last time I ask, I promise!

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Hello brewers!

 

Okay - I want to move into some 5 gallon extract batches. (Listen Mr. Beer - I love you and I'm not leaving you. It's just there are some 5 gallon kits that have clones, etc. I really want to try. I will still be #mrbeer4ever).

 

I am getting a 5 gallon brew pot and am going to split the batch between two LBKs.

 

Here is my question -

 

How do you get the wort from the 5 gallon pot into the LBKs. It seems like it is an awful lot to tilt and pour.

 

I know this has been answered many times, and I am pretty sure I have asked it before. - but maybe we can get an aggregate of the techniques here and I promise this is the last time I ask!

 

(The brew pot I get is not going to be one of those expensive ones with the nozzle thing. It is just going to be a big stainless steel pot.)

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22 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

Auto-siphon, AKA racking cane. 

 

Okay - 1 vote for racking cane!

Two stupid questions ...... is it easy to use? Once it starts siphoning....how do you stop it? (Since I would be splitting it between two LBKs.

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I do it the easy way.  1 quart measuring cup, 2 cup measuring cup, and a strainer.  Scoop with 2 cup measuring cup, pour into strainer on top of 1 quart measuring cup.  When full to line, pour into LBK #1.  Now do LBK #2.  Then #2 again, then #1.  

 

Simple.

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49 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Okay - 1 vote for racking cane!

Two stupid questions ...... is it easy to use? Once it starts siphoning....how do you stop it? (Since I would be splitting it between two LBKs.

It's uses gravity, so it's quite easy. In order to stop it, you simply reverse gravity :P In all seriousness, raising the LBK higher than the brew pot will stop the flow. 

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

I do it the easy way.  1 quart measuring cup, 2 cup measuring cup, and a strainer.  Scoop with 2 cup measuring cup, pour into strainer on top of 1 quart measuring cup.  When full to line, pour into LBK #1.  Now do LBK #2.  Then #2 again, then #1.  

 

Simple.

 

Thanks @RickBeer -

 

Quick question - How come you strain?

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1 hour ago, Big Sarge said:

It's uses gravity, so it's quite easy. In order to stop it, you simply reverse gravity :P In all seriousness, raising the LBK higher than the brew pot will stop the flow. 

 

Gravity.

 

Who knew!

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20 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Gravity.

 

Who knew!

Did-You-Know.jpg

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Also, auto siphons usually come with a tiny little plastic piece that fits over your hose. You pinch it to stop the flow, open to begin again.  Why cant i find a damn pic of these things!?!?!?

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Also, while were talking about it, just get an ale pail. Theyre dirt cheap and its just easier to use one fermenter as long as it fits in your chamber if you have one. 

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I do what rick does...

 

sanitize pyrex measuring cup (for me 4 cup size). sanitize a mesh strainer and plop it on top of fermenter.  transfer cooled wort via strainer which also aerates wort. when the pot gets low enough to easily dump by hand...  pour into strainer.

 

strainer sifts out hop crud and some break material.

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Thank you everyone for your assistance with my upcoming move to some five gallon extract recipes. Still not sure between an auto-siphon or cups. I like the concept of the auto-siphon, but can I really trust gravity?

The cups seem like a lot of pouring.......can my arms hold up to the strain?

 

I said I would never go five gallon.......

 

Now I'm wondering ......brew in a bag?

 

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Sorry, butt that's not me.  I was the stand in for Matthew McConaughey (right front).  That naked person has been rumored to be one of the other community members, but I can't say who... Hop,,,  Hop...

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2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

 

Now I'm wondering ......brew in a bag?

 

Brew in a bag is great for 5 gallon all grain or as a carefully done hop catcher but will not help with splitting into 2 LBKs since the bag is a large reusable strainer sack. If you want to split into 2 LBKs either go with the auto siphon or the measuring cup recommendations, but honestly my recommendation would be to spend a little bit and get a fermenter large enough (6.5 or 7 gallon) to hold the full 5 gallon batch.

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1 hour ago, hotrod3539 said:

Brew in a bag is great for 5 gallon all grain or as a carefully done hop catcher but will not help with splitting into 2 LBKs since the bag is a large reusable strainer sack. If you want to split into 2 LBKs either go with the auto siphon or the measuring cup recommendations, but honestly my recommendation would be to spend a little bit and get a fermenter large enough (6.5 or 7 gallon) to hold the full 5 gallon batch.

 

Yeah - I was thinking more of my progression as a brewer......once I was convinced all I would ever do is 2.5 gallon extract batches. Now here I am bumping up into the 5 gallon extract, steeping grain route and already wondering if I've got a 5 gallon pot, maybe I can get into the brew in a bag thing......I just read a tutorial on partial mash/DME stuff using a BIAB......

 

I have four problems with the 6.5/7 gallon fermenters:

1. While you all are clearly people of supreme ability, I am much more confident carrying around one LBK at a time than lugging a 5 gallons worth of wort at a time. Don't get me wrong....I am actually quite strong. But still.....

2. Bottling - I prefer to have the option of splitting the bottling time if needed. My schedule can be quite chaotic and I love the idea of, if need be, bottling one LBK one day and then bottling the next.

3. Temp control - My fridges are totally lame and have this weird protrusion inside. I am not confident at all I can get a 6 gallon bucket in there and I really don't want to do any of those temp bags.

4. I already have the LBKs.......

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No worries @MrWhy! I am a big fan of you do what works best for you! Just thought I would toss my half a penny in (I would have said 2 cents but I ain't got that kind a money...lol)

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19 minutes ago, hotrod3539 said:

No worries @MrWhy! I am a big fan of you do what works best for you! Just thought I would toss my half a penny in (I would have said 2 cents but I ain't got that kind a money...lol)

 

I appreciate that half penny!!!!!!!

 

I generally throw in a quarter of cent and am happy it gets put in the pot.

 

If we all throw in our half pennies, eventually we will have like....100 half pennies. And that my friend, just might be a quarter.....(Rick Beer will have to help with the math.)

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2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

Yeah - I was thinking more of my progression as a brewer......once I was convinced all I would ever do is 2.5 gallon extract batches. Now here I am bumping up into the 5 gallon extract, steeping grain route and already wondering if I've got a 5 gallon pot, maybe I can get into the brew in a bag thing......I just read a tutorial on partial mash/DME stuff using a BIAB......

 

I have four problems with the 6.5/7 gallon fermenters:

1. While you all are clearly people of supreme ability, I am much more confident carrying around one LBK at a time than lugging a 5 gallons worth of wort at a time. Don't get me wrong....I am actually quite strong. But still.....

2. Bottling - I prefer to have the option of splitting the bottling time if needed. My schedule can be quite chaotic and I love the idea of, if need be, bottling one LBK one day and then bottling the next.

3. Temp control - My fridges are totally lame and have this weird protrusion inside. I am not confident at all I can get a 6 gallon bucket in there and I really don't want to do any of those temp bags.

4. I already have the LBKs.......

 

I use the 6 gallon fermenter sold by Mr. Beer.

 

1.  Maybe I'm starting to buzz a bit, but you lost me on "carrying around" and "lugging".  I don't move any fermenter while the yeast is doing their thing.  Yes, a 6 gallon container is very heavy, though.  What I do is put the fermenter where it plans to live for 3 weeks, and fill it up there, not fill it up and move it.

2.  If you plan to do two LBKs for a 5 gallon batch, not sure you could "split" that much more than a day or two.  I think you could probably do the same with at 6 gallon fermenter.  Just fill bottles until you quit, and pick back up the next day.

3.  That.....is my problem and why I have to keep my apartment at 68F.  The 6 gallon fermenter that Mr. Beer sells is too big for my fridge, and I don't want to buy another fridge just for it.  I will make one more 6 gal batch, then stop it until October, when I won't have to run the AC 24/7 just to keep the fermenter cold.

4.  That's an easy problem...........brew them AND the 6 gallon fermenter.  HA.

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1 minute ago, MiniYoda said:

 

I use the 6 gallon fermenter sold by Mr. Beer.

 

1.  Maybe I'm starting to buzz a bit, but you lost me on "carrying around" and "lugging".  I don't move any fermenter while the yeast is doing their thing.  Yes, a 6 gallon container is very heavy, though.  What I do is put the fermenter where it plans to live for 3 weeks, and fill it up there, not fill it up and move it.

2.  If you plan to do two LBKs for a 5 gallon batch, not sure you could "split" that much more than a day or two.  I think you could probably do the same with at 6 gallon fermenter.  Just fill bottles until you quit, and pick back up the next day.

3.  That.....is my problem and why I have to keep my apartment at 68F.  The 6 gallon fermenter that Mr. Beer sells is too big for my fridge, and I don't want to buy another fridge just for it.  I will make one more 6 gal batch, then stop it until October, when I won't have to run the AC 24/7 just to keep the fermenter cold.

4.  That's an easy problem...........brew them AND the 6 gallon fermenter.  HA.

 

* I set up and work in my kitchen, and I ferment in my garage. And conversely, I bottle in my kitchen. I don't have an accessible sink in the garage. So I need to move wort between those two locations. It is not impossible, and I am quite strong, but I still prefer avoid it. If I ever went all grain I would probably move to brewing on my patio....but I am nowhere near that yet. I am sure this is surmountable issue....but I am just not at the point to try and surmount it.

* That is part of the thing....moving everything to the kitchen, bottling 1/2....back to the garage....all I need is a day or few. It just mentally seems easier to move 1 lbk and be done.

* Have you looked at those fermenting bags? They seem good. My problem is I ferment in the garage and it soars to 100 plus easily very quickly. This weekend temps are going to get to 95 here and that will put my garage into the 110. I just saw a garage in my complex that is basically set up as a brewery....so I need to find this dude and converse with him.

* MORE PRODUCTION RULES ALL!!!!

 

 

 

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yea, moving the fermenter won't be much of an option for you.  I brew, ferment and bottle all in the kitchen, since I'm the only person in my apartment.

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5 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

Yeah - I was thinking more of my progression as a brewer......once I was convinced all I would ever do is 2.5 gallon extract batches. Now here I am bumping up into the 5 gallon extract, steeping grain route and already wondering if I've got a 5 gallon pot, maybe I can get into the brew in a bag thing......I just read a tutorial on partial mash/DME stuff using a BIAB......

 

I have four problems with the 6.5/7 gallon fermenters:

1. While you all are clearly people of supreme ability, I am much more confident carrying around one LBK at a time than lugging a 5 gallons worth of wort at a time. Don't get me wrong....I am actually quite strong. But still.....

2. Bottling - I prefer to have the option of splitting the bottling time if needed. My schedule can be quite chaotic and I love the idea of, if need be, bottling one LBK one day and then bottling the next.

3. Temp control - My fridges are totally lame and have this weird protrusion inside. I am not confident at all I can get a 6 gallon bucket in there and I really don't want to do any of those temp bags.

4. I already have the LBKs.......

 

Grains and BIAB ( or Mash-in-a-Sack, as I call it) changed my life!  You still get to hang around your enabling friends on The Forum while brewing 2 gallon batches of beer with no more investment than a few reusable mesh bags and a 3-4 gallon pot ;).  You will quickly find that your creative energies are boundless -- HME + grains, LMEs + hops/grains, All-grain, etc.. You can brew the Belgian of your dreams!?

Edited by Bonsai & Brew
Bold type added for clarity and context
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My input:

 

i move fermenters all the time. Never had a problem. If i know ill be moving it a lot then i put it on a movers dolly. I surrendered my chamber to the inlaws to use as an actual freezer. So now i am limited to three options. Close to basement wall for approx 62, ten feet from wall for approx 65, and cold closet for 55

 

I agree that kegging is easier but hot damn is it expensive sometimes...

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@bocklover ; @Creeps McLane

 

Kegging would be awesome, and if I ever find the space to put a kegarator or something like that, I would totally consider going all in. But it seems like it has a steep learning curve, and when all is said and done, it still seems that as much of a pain as bottling can be, kegging looks like it can be even more so.

 

Bottling 1 LBK, especially now that I am exclusively using 750 ml (glass or plastic) is more than manageable and seems to tilt my equation back to bottling over kegging.

 

 

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I am also dipping my toe in the 5 gallon brew lake. I picked up some stuff off craigslist. My question has to do with cold crashing. I am fermenting in the six gallon fermenter,, and my kit came with the ale pale with drilled hole and spout, but it will be quite difficult to get either one of those in the refrigerator. Can I "rack" (is that the right word?) my beer to two LBKs, then cold crash and bottle. Thoughts?

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15 minutes ago, Broox said:

I am also dipping my toe in the 5 gallon brew lake. I picked up some stuff off craigslist. My question has to do with cold crashing. I am fermenting in the six gallon fermenter,, and my kit came with the ale pale with drilled hole and spout, but it will be quite difficult to get either one of those in the refrigerator. Can I "rack" (is that the right word?) my beer to two LBKs, then cold crash and bottle. Thoughts?

Dont cold crash, it's an option not a necessity 

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1 hour ago, Broox said:

I am also dipping my toe in the 5 gallon brew lake. I picked up some stuff off craigslist. My question has to do with cold crashing. I am fermenting in the six gallon fermenter,, and my kit came with the ale pale with drilled hole and spout, but it will be quite difficult to get either one of those in the refrigerator. Can I "rack" (is that the right word?) my beer to two LBKs, then cold crash and bottle. Thoughts?

 

I've never cold crashed before bottling.

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25 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

I've never cold crashed before bottling.

Me either, and I have been complemented on my beer clarity. Mind you it has sat in bottle for a while.

 

I can see if you want a quick turnaround, or you plan to move your bottles around a lot or transport them. then it could be a benefit.

 

But I need the other benefits of it maturing on bottles so this is a bonus.

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2 hours ago, Broox said:

I am also dipping my toe in the 5 gallon brew lake. I picked up some stuff off craigslist. My question has to do with cold crashing. I am fermenting in the six gallon fermenter,, and my kit came with the ale pale with drilled hole and spout, but it will be quite difficult to get either one of those in the refrigerator. Can I "rack" (is that the right word?) my beer to two LBKs, then cold crash and bottle. Thoughts?

OK now that I have some more time what I want to tell you is that if you are fermenting in a carboy or one pail and then batch priming into another bucket I think that you'll cut down on the amount of yeast that goes into your bottles. Therefore no need for cold crashing. I've had friends assume that I have bottled from a keg because my beer is so clear because I use my auto siphon and let it sit at the top of the beer as I racket into my bottling bucket. Its tedious but worth it

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5 hours ago, bocklover said:

It's actually alot easier than bottling. You clean and sanitize 1 keg, Add 1/2 the normal amount of priming sugar, siphon in your beer, cap it and wait 2 weeks then hook it up to the kegerator. How could that be more confusing than bottling? 

But the set up cost is quite steep! but OHHH so worth it.

I save a step and don't even use priming sugar, I just use my co2 tank and carbonate that way.... 

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On 4/21/2017 at 8:02 PM, Creeps McLane said:

OK now that I have some more time what I want to tell you is that if you are fermenting in a carboy or one pail and then batch priming into another bucket I think that you'll cut down on the amount of yeast that goes into your bottles. Therefore no need for cold crashing. I've had friends assume that I have bottled from a keg because my beer is so clear because I use my auto siphon and let it sit at the top of the beer as I racket into my bottling bucket. Its tedious but worth it

Well, typical me, I did not follow any of the advice that I asked for. I auto siphoned into two LBKs. They are cold crashing now. I base this purely on conjecture, but surely there will be enough yeast to carb. Oh well, I will know in about six weeks.

 

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1 minute ago, Broox said:

Well, typical me, I did not follow any of the advice that I asked for. I auto siphoned into two LBKs. They are cold crashing now. I base this purely on conjecture, but surely there will be enough yeast to carb. Oh well, I will know in about six weeks.

 

Sounds perfect to me

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On ‎4‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 10:56 AM, RickBeer said:

Did someone say naked?

 

 

terry bradhshaw failure to launch.png

Rick has finally exposed himself to us all!

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