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Wolfpack Brewing

New Brewer Here-Wolfpack Brewing

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Hey everyone!  I'm a new brewer in the Dallas, TX area!

I have two LBKs.  On Saturday evening, I began a brew of Aztec Mexican Cerveza.  I used tap water for this brew, and without thinking about it, I refrigerated water in containers that were not sterilized, however I did sterilize all the utensils.  On Sunday morning, I noticed that bubbles were rising, and the wort was producing a thick head of foam in the keg.  By Sunday evening, it was a huge head, and I'm guessing that was high krausen.  Monday it was about the same, and today it has almost completely subsided.  I have not seen any sediment in this keg over the past several days.  There are also no bubbles rising now.

On Tuesday evening, I started a second brew of Aztec Mexican Cerveza in my second LBK.  With this brew, I used tap water for the 4 cups for boiling, and bottled spring water that I refrigerated to fill the LBK before and after adding the wort.  I didn't have time to check the keg this morning before leaving for work, but this evening I checked it and there is a head of foam, but it is not very big.  However there are a lot of small bubbles coming up through the wort, almost roiling.  There is also a large amount of sediment in this keg.

I would imagine that both of them are fermenting, but could the lack of sediment in the first keg have anything to do with using tap water vs. bottled?

Also, in the basic instructions, it says to allow 3 weeks for fermentation, but on the LME cans, it states 2 weeks for fermentation.

I want to add lime juice and raspberries (canned and frozen) to both kegs for the final week of fermentation.  Should I be aiming for a 3 week total fermentation before bottling or 2 week total fermentation before bottling?  So should I add fruit at 1 week or 2 weeks?

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Water makes no difference.

 

Add fruit after 2 weeks then go another week.  Blend in sanitized blender, open lid and quickly but gently pour in and put lid back on.

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4 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Water makes no difference.

 

 

 

If water makes no difference, why would one have sediment and the other does not?  Is it normal for the foam to subside so quickly?

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Because every fermentation is different.  If you ferment at too high a temp, you may get a very active fermentation, and off flavors.

 

My advice - stop looking.

 

And control temps.

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Wolfpack,

 

First of all, Welcome to the obsession (hobby) we all call brewing.

 

By all means look at your fermentation, everybody here but @RickBeer does it.  Just make sure you don't open your LBK to look.  As @RickBeer said, every fermentation is different.  You can do the same brew in two different LBKs at the same time and have them sitting side by side and have different looking fermentations. 

 

One thing I did note however with regard to the water you used.  For the 1st batch you said you used tap water for the entire brew.  It should be fine to use straight out of the tap but if it is from your local city water source, it will have chlorine or chorimine(sp) in it.   You need to remove this before you brew with it.  Your local LHBS or any online brew store will have Campden tablets that will serve this purpose.

 

Also, you said that they were in a dark place (good) at 68 to 70 degrees.  If the temperature is air temperature, it is probably too hot.  You need to get the wort temperature down to at least that level on your next batch (too late for these).   There are many threads that cover temperature control on the forum, search them out and go with the option that will work best for you. 

 

Dawg

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On 5/4/2017 at 6:42 AM, BDawg62 said:

Wolfpack,

 

First of all, Welcome to the obsession (hobby) we all call brewing.

 

By all means look at your fermentation, everybody here but @RickBeer does it.  Just make sure you don't open your LBK to look.  As @RickBeer said, every fermentation is different.  You can do the same brew in two different LBKs at the same time and have them sitting side by side and have different looking fermentations. 

 

One thing I did note however with regard to the water you used.  For the 1st batch you said you used tap water for the entire brew.  It should be fine to use straight out of the tap but if it is from your local city water source, it will have chlorine or chorimine(sp) in it.   You need to remove this before you brew with it.  Your local LHBS or any online brew store will have Campden tablets that will serve this purpose.

 

Also, you said that they were in a dark place (good) at 68 to 70 degrees.  If the temperature is air temperature, it is probably too hot.  You need to get the wort temperature down to at least that level on your next batch (too late for these).   There are many threads that cover temperature control on the forum, search them out and go with the option that will work best for you. 

 

Dawg

 

Thanks!  I haven't opened the LBKs, I've just shined a flashlight into them to see.  I won't be opening them until I add the fruit.

Yes, the air temp is 68-70 degrees, but I did cool the wort before adding the yeast.  Even the one I used tap water, I had the water refrigerated in containers down to 50 degrees.  So the wort was cool.  So if the LBKs are sitting at room temp after having cooled the wort before adding the yeast, isn't that ok?

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Welcome Wolf!!!!!

 

Wolfpack....Lone Wolf......it's all brewing!!!!!

 

Regarding your question....it is all a matter of degree....HAHAHAHAHA....pun intended...get it???? degree.!!!!

 

All we can do is the best we can do, and we will certainly end up with beer. No doubt, it will be beer and have alcohol. Maybe it tastes great! We drink a lot and are happy. Maybe we have a shot of vodka before each pour. We are still happy.

 

As you progress as a brewer here is what we try to do....

1. Nail brewing process ---- nail sanitization.  Nail process. Nail pitching. Nail brewing etc.

2. Nail bottling sanitization.....

3. Begin to control fermentation temps.

4. Explore recipe creation.....

 

My first brews fermentation temps were a shit-show. Some tasted great. Some tasted off. Every beer got me happy. As I progressed I began to expand my capabilities each brew.


Don't worry if fermentation temp is not what you are working on right now. You might get to it. You might focus on yeast.

 

In the end you are making beer, we are glad you are here, and welcome!

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re beer in a dark place... I will quote someone who mentored me here long ago...

 

beer is not a vampire.

 

yes, sunlight and UV radiation will skunk a beer.

no- most household light bulbs don't put out that much uv. incandescent none at all.  fluorescent somewhat.

 

keep the thing out of sunlight... and youre golden. no need to lock it in a closet in the dark. temperature control is more important.  fermenting in an ambient temp of 70f can mean internal temps during peak fermentation of about 75-80+ degrees until things slow down. during that time the yeast will pee out all manner of off flavors like cider.   

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On 5/6/2017 at 3:24 AM, zorak1066 said:

re beer in a dark place... I will quote someone who mentored me here long ago...

 

beer is not a vampire.

 

yes, sunlight and UV radiation will skunk a beer.

no- most household light bulbs don't put out that much uv. incandescent none at all.  fluorescent somewhat.

 

keep the thing out of sunlight... and youre golden. no need to lock it in a closet in the dark. temperature control is more important.  fermenting in an ambient temp of 70f can mean internal temps during peak fermentation of about 75-80+ degrees until things slow down. during that time the yeast will pee out all manner of off flavors like cider.   

It's not locked in a closet.  I actually have it set up in my guest room since I don't have anyone visiting.  It stays fairly dark in that room unless I walk in there and turn the lights on.  Otherwise the room is undisturbed by my dogs (3 Siberian huskies).

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