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I love using smoked grains in my beer.  If you know me then you know that if the recipe is called Smoked Porter than 2 things are a MUST: 1. I BETTER taste some smoke in that bad boy 2. I am going to double-down on the smoked grains.  

 

Here is my dilemma...  My smoked porters & stouts always turn out "thin".  Yes, I've tried carapils for head retention (not thickness) and oats in the stouts, but it's not enough.  Any advice?  Thanks in advance!

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1 hour ago, AnthonyC said:

I love using smoked grains in my beer.  If you know me then you know that if the recipe is called Smoked Porter than 2 things are a MUST: 1. I BETTER taste some smoke in that bad boy 2. I am going to double-down on the smoked grains.  

 

Here is my dilemma...  My smoked porters & stouts always turn out "thin".  Yes, I've tried carapils for head retention (not thickness) and oats in the stouts, but it's not enough.  Any advice?  Thanks in advance!

What do you typically use? Like a pale malt and then some roasted and flaked barley? 

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Carapils should add some body, but you can also try using some 2-row and flaked barley in addition to the Carapils (this will slightly raise the ABV). Or try using powdered maltodextrin. This will add body and head retention without changing the flavor, abv, etc. I'd start with 1/2 cup in the batch (2 gallon) and see if it helps. If not, raise it to a full cup in your next batch.

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37 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

What do you typically use? Like a pale malt and then some roasted and flaked barley? 

I used all of the above.  Even considered flaked corn in moderation.

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35 minutes ago, efdbrian said:

Are these all grain or extract / partial mash?

These were partial mash.

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You simply may just need to start with a higher gravity wort (add more grains, DME etc.) What is the initial gravity?

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45 minutes ago, Brian N. said:

You simply may just need to start with a higher gravity wort (add more grains, DME etc.) What is the initial gravity?

Not 100% sure.  I'd have to go back into the archives and take a look.  If you know me Brian, you'd know that I add plenty of DME & grains.  I sometimes go a little nuts with them.  ?

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15 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

These were partial mash.

What temp was your water during your mash phase?  A higher temp, say in the 154*-156* range will give you more unfermentable sugars, thus a fuller body.

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1 minute ago, kedogn said:

What temp was your water during your mash phase?  A higher temp, say in the 154*-156* range will give you more unfermentable sugars, thus a fuller body.

That may be the issue!  Temps were a few degrees lower than that.  ?

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10 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

That may be the issue!  Temps were a few degrees lower than that.  ?

Mash temp has a lot to do with how your beer's mouth feel will be.   Typically, 148*-151* will give you more of a thinner body beer, as the starches will convert to more complete and the yeasties will eat right through them.  152*-153* is the sweet spot for medium body beers, which is where I usually mash for all my IPAs, Ambers and Pales.  However, like I said above, 154*-156* is the range for more fuller body beers, since it will leave you with more unfermentable sugars.  Some will say that range can be as high as 158* as well, though, even for a stout, I have never gone that high.

And.... your mash water PH can play into all this as well. :)

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