Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Gutterbunnie

Tweaking a Blueberry Kolsch recipe

Recommended Posts

For my next batch I want to make a blueberry beer. Found a recipe I'm going to tweak which calls for  10 oz crushed blueberries at 20 min boil, & then add more frozen blueberries at 14 days  in secondary, but to also add potassium sorbate to stop blueberries from being fermented. I was wondering if potassium sorbate does something to stop ALL yeast fermentation which I don't want  & therefore I don't want to add that compound. Plus I bottle condition so I still want my yeast to be working to carb my beers.

From what I've read it can be difficult to get enough blueberry flavor in the end product. What if I add like 2lbs of crushed/frozen blueberry at 7 days without the potassium? This is for a 2 gallon all extract using Safale K97. Or should I buy a few cans of the Mr Beer blueberry & add that at 7 days? I haven't done a fruit beer before so this is stepping out of my comfort zone.  Also I don't have a large blender so I'll have to use a magic bullet  mini bender or just a potato masher that's been sanitized. Thoughts on this process? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got it- canned it is! Best deal seems to be through MR beer. Yup will make it work: mini blender will just take a bit longer to prep. no potassium sorbate - when I researched more it's mostly used in winemaking?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But to answer the question you posed. K-sorbate inhibits yeast from budding. Doesn't kill them and doesn't prevent fermentation in any literal way but what it does is prevent yeast cells from reproducing. That means that when yeast cell die there are none to replace them and I think that the chronological lifespan of a yeast cell once brought back into animated life is about 6 days... At least that is my understanding of what K-sorbate does, though if you have ever tried to ferment say, apple juice that has been preserved with sorbates, you will know that it is as close to impossible as possible to get the yeast to overcome the sorbates. 

That said "pasteurizing" fruit (AKA cooking it) makes fruit taste like jam.. but you can always add k-meta (AKA Campden tablets) dissolved in water 24 hours before you add any fruit to a fermentation. K-meta produces SO2 and sulfur dioxide will kill wild yeast and other microbes (LAB, for example) on the surface (and insides) of fruit. The 24 hours is needed to allow the SO2 to evaporate off. This is a standard procedure used by wine makers. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^ this.  Was going to post similar before I saw Brewer's post.  Here are the blueberries hanging in secondary on my current cider, for instance.  Followed the same process Brewer describes...

 

Ofig75aeVw-qWe3CoHYUdPzxbhrm8IleYfFQC3NNemkFYu0_YQc3jyy6Cb99yO9eTQ41yYv6lJJg9Y2PoDX_g8t580yr6osNcmCoOUGy05z6n9c6ZmxUfdy92ebXuzED29SU2-_78sypFELGYVYf0zpOfL4EjSS4csgy2bmy7sEJVkwQ57Me5fT1siy5MQqlH5pf2xItwX9T245eQGSXJmCJePwOCFoLoVdwPi-Vh1D2ujVG7q1qivbetC-79NSBIeaAbYAs78nBSVy_DNTXmmm-JHPKOUhGyQNuPwgP9fI59PDiQtoLOwsEc4GZ2wi3Vud-6OIkoWc2U5F029R0IZMCCzWwxyxoDxgILSbAqC2ci7hS-07Vq5X89DdO3rBzprCON_ga9ue2k_alVPgRCIAEwBbv_1r1S45hPQgVuPZ-2W-aDcTfAxMhE93yytctm0dmB-lbjRZs2Xep3u5Xuq18R64TjSuGGMzMmoljGYQ0MqW15NvSArWZQsoRPBCzlsfHGvGjYFt-1AiB6jJBO-ziy08f0MfSnz0ZusDLywtNoUSxe6Vgnn6vrdJP5KTXsHaIH1Bj54WqQn1ycoKOXke3t49ibC2VN_ptSQqO=w687-h915-no

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...