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Bottle priming with Corn Sugar

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Question for experienced brewers:  If I  bottle prime my beer after cold crashing (~40F) with Carlson corn sugar how do I figure the proper amount per MRB's 25 oz bottles (at 2.4 CO2 vol.) ?  A friend suggested 3/4 of a teaspoon per bottle, but that seems much less than the MRB recommended 2 carbo drops per bottle.  How do you guys do it?  Bottle prime or batch prime?

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someone will correct me if i'm wrong, but i don't think so. sugar is sugar. follow the MRB priming chart. 2 tsp per 740ml PET bottle. that is for bottle priming. i use 12 oz glass bottles and use 1/2 tsp per bottle. sometimes i'll use 3/4 tsp if i want more fizz.

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1 hour ago, Jdub said:

someone will correct me if i'm wrong, but i don't think so. sugar is sugar. follow the MRB priming chart. 2 tsp per 740ml PET bottle. that is for bottle priming. i use 12 oz glass bottles and use 1/2 tsp per bottle. sometimes i'll use 3/4 tsp if i want more fizz.

 

You're right, I forgot about the priming chart included with the instructions.  I was trying to equate the drops to teaspoons.  Thanks!

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Corn sugar and cane sugar are different since corn sugar is not quite as fermentable as cane sugar.  The measurements that you use per bottle of cane sugar will work with corn sugar but will leave slightly less carbonation.  For arguement sake, say that 1/2 tsp per bottle will net 2.4 volumes of carbonation with cane sugar it will net about 2.3 volumes with corn sugar.

 

Corn sugar has 95% of the fermentable potential of cane sugar.

 

I batch prime so when you do that you also need to know the highest temperature the beer reached and not the current temperature.

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2 hours ago, BDawg62 said:

I batch prime so when you do that you also need to know the highest temperature the beer reached and not the current temperature.

 

I've found an affordable source of 'corn sugar' for priming (which is why I asked after that) but will continue to look for other sources of fermentables.  Also, I thank you for the advice on temperature vs measure.  I kinda wondered why cold-crashing for 48-72 hours (lowering temp by 30+ degrees) would mean adding less sugar since the temp at fermentation (for 21 days) was much higher.

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4 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

I use between 50 and 65 grams, depending on style for my 2.5 gallon batches.  http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/p/brewing-tools-formulas.html#bpc

 

Thanks Rick. 

Using the calculator you furnished a link to yields 12.2 teaspoons for a 2 gallon batch, using corn sugar, for a CO2 vol of 2.5 (assuming 70F).  That comes to around 1 tsp per bottle, assuming I reach a full 12 bottle batch, slightly more if I reach only 11.  That is different than the priming chart in the MRB instructions of 2 tsp per bottle.  I guess the MRB recommended amount achieves a higher CO2 volume?

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You would be correct.

 

Many people find that using roughly 2/3rds of the Mr. Beer recommend amount is best.  That would be 1 1/3rd for that size bottle.  

 

I will tell you that I doubt that anyone could tell the difference on carbonation between 1tsp and 1 1/3 tsps, but you never know.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

I will tell you that I doubt that anyone could tell the difference on carbonation between 1tsp and 1 1/3 tsps, but you never know.

 

What do home brewers use to increase the head on beer, say an IPA or Porter?

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6 minutes ago, Squirley Mic said:

 

What do home brewers use to increase the head on beer, say an IPA or Porter?

Carapils, or I think some malted wheat will help with that too.

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10 minutes ago, Squirley Mic said:

 

What do home brewers use to increase the head on beer, say an IPA or Porter?

Dextrine malts. Carapils, wheat, maltodextrin. Hops are actually good for head retention. Also a pint glass is terrible for head retention. Any glass that has an etching in the bottom of the glass is excellent at producing a good head.

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It appears that my minions have done my work for me.  My work here is done!  😉

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1 minute ago, Creeps McLane said:

Dextrine malts. Carapils, wheat, maltodextrin. Hops are actually good for head retention. Also a pint glass is terrible for head retention. Any glass that has an etching in the bottom of the glass is excellent at producing a good head. 

Looks like I need to do some research on 'carapils'.  Also, I have never heard of etching in the bottom of a glass affecting head.  Interesting.

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10 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Sam Adams monetized this.  Sam Adams Perfect Pint Glasses - set of 2

 

The etching provides points of nucleation.  Unlike like Sheldon Cooper would lead you to believe, this is not to blow up the world. 

 

Sheldon Cooper....hmmm.  Well, if etching works, I guess I gotta try it.  (woo-ee! these puppies are 'spensive!)  Meantime, I go a find out what carapils are!  😊

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Carapils are really small bugs that you put into the beer.  They hop around, and make the beer foam. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caramel Pils - 1.5°L - This very light caramel malt will improve body and head retention. Caramel Pils is ideal for use in Pilsner, light lager, and low alcohol beers. Balances body and flavor without adding color, aids in head retention. For any beer.  Made by Briess.

 

Cara Foam Malt - 1.7 - 2.1L - Best used to create Pilsners, lagers, and low- or nonalcoholic beers. Increases smoothness and mouth fullness, without adding any flavors. Try Carafoam instead of Carapils. This malt is a "steeping grain" and you need to steep it for 45 minutes in 150-170F water to extract the characteristics of this malt. Use 5-6 ounces in your next batch for better head retention. Made by Weyermann.
 
Malto Dextrin - a derivative of corn.  Increases body and mouthfeel.  
 
Flaked Oats - 1°L - Gives a slightly nutty flavor to beer. Very sticky when mashing, and can lead to a stuck runoff and hazy beer if used in excess. Popular in stouts and other darker beers. 1 to 3 percent of grist improves head on any beer without risk of haze or stuck mashes. Adds body and creamy head. For stouts and oat ales.
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Like this stout in the Sam Adams glass. Straight up MB stout, with about 1/2 the recommended amount of sugar. Fermented at 64 deg F for 24 days, then conditioned about 6 months.

beer.jpg

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Ah, yes...but there's the rub.  You say: 'aged 6 months'.  My wife would have to handcuff me and lock me in the tower for any of my batches ever last that long.  (Very nice looking head on this puppy, btw).  😬

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Here's something I found in the wife's pantry, wondering if this might be something to play with in the future.  Anyone here ever use this stuff in a recipe?

Coconut sugar.JPG

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A quick Google search shows it's sugar, despite the fancy name.  No added value to use in brewing.

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

 No added value to use in brewing.

 

Apparently there's only added value in the price.  The wife said this stuff is expensive.  It was a gift from a neighbor who was out to convert her into using this.  2 years ago.

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And then... I found these two website (among others) talking about coconut palm sugar in the brewing process.  Seems it is done and commercially, at that.  I may save the stuff from being thrown out and find a use for it down the road sometime.

rsz_screenshot_69.png

rsz_screenshot_70.png

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