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Bonsai & Brew

Stau-Haus Slash Pile IPAūüĆ≤

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Stau-Haus Slash Pile IPA

 

2-gallon, all-grain (mash-in-sack)

 

Prepare 2 gallons of distilled strike water adding:

  • calcium sulfate ( gypsum), 2 g
  • sodium chloride, 0.25 g
  • calcium chloride,¬†0.5 g

 

Ingredients:

  • Rahr 2-row, 4 lbs.
  • Weyermann CaraWheat, 0.18 lb.
  • Chinook, 0.25 oz. ea,¬†60 min., 10 min., 5 min.
  • Simcoe, 0.2 oz. ea,¬†20 min., 2 min.
  • Magnum, 0.3 oz., 15 min.
  • Irish moss @ 15 min
  • Yeast nutrient @ 10 min.
  • Safale US-05¬†

 

Mash grains @ 152 F for 60 min..

Mash-out @ 168 F for 10 min.

Sprinkle sparge with hot tap water.

Boil, hop, chill and pitch!

 

OG 1.050

SRM 6

IBU 60+

 

 

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Alright @Bonsai & Brew, how long have you been messing with water? I'm a little behind in keeping up on the forum, so I'm jumping around. I've been dorking around with reading and learning about water, absorbing as much as I can before committing to all grain. I know it's not necessary, but there's nothing wrong with learning more and eliminating variables. 

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Hi @Big Sarge!  My first brew salt additions were earlier this year with my English Bitter recipes as our water has no chloride or sulfate but has high alkalinity (308 mg/L!) That might work fine for HME batches and dark all-grain beers but there was no way that I was going to brew a respectable Bitter, Pale Ale or IPA without addressing my residual alkalinity issue.  I would recommend poking around the Brewer's Friend website (or getting BeerSmith 3), obtain a water report, and read Palmer's chapter dealing with water chemistry.  Once you know where your water is at you can pick a style-specific profile and make the necessary modifications to your water.  Using the BF calculator, I was surprised how little calcium sulfate, calcium chloride and baking soda is added to deionized water to yield a more balanced profile for brewing a Pale Ale.  Finally, I've just recently gotten more serious about 'dialing-in' recipes and improving my beers, but I'm still learning along with everyone else about this fascinating aspect of brewing!

 

 

 

 

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I did recently purchase BeerSmith 3, which really piqued my curiosity when I was running through all the features of the app. As far as obtaining a water report from this small town in Oklahoma, I feel like they would think I'm crazy if I walked into town hall and asked for it lol. I jest, of course, knowing they probably have the stats on hand. I have done some fair reading on the subject already (BYO magazine and such), only to find out that I'm an idiot and realize why I failed chemistry in high school. I tell people that I liked chemistry so much, I took it twice. 

Question: what made you build the water profile from a distilled base? Although I probably have no idea what I'm talking about, it does seem easy. I can only assume it's not very cost effective. 

I'm certainly with you on dialing in the different aspects of brewing. Each of the four basic ingredients come with so many ways to perfect them and their part in the processes of brewing. 

I apologize for high jacking your post!

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@Big Sarge¬† For some low/no alkalinity¬†water profiles, I have no choice but to start with deionized water then¬†add calcium, sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc. to hit the numbers. ¬†For a more balanced profile, I¬†might be able to dilute my well water 1:1 with DI. ¬†For a Burton Ale, I can brew straight up. ¬†As for high-jacking the Slash Pile IPA topic, this thread was destined for the Lost Forum Topic round file until you livened it up, and actually, this is the first IPA water profile that I've attempted so post on!ūüćĽ

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1 minute ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

@Big Sarge¬† For some low/no alkalinity¬†water profiles, I have no choice but to start with deionized water then¬†add calcium, sodium, chloride, sulfate, etc. to hit the numbers. ¬†For a more balanced profile, I¬†might be able to dilute my well water 1:1 with DI. ¬†For a Burton Ale, I can brew straight up. ¬†As for high-jacking the Slash Pile IPA topic, this thread was destined for the Lost Forum Topic round file until you livened it up, and actually, this is the first IPA water profile that I've attempted so post on!ūüćĽ

That makes a lot of sense, since you are seeking such low alkalinity. I never really thought of the dilution method to balance out the water. Curious though (and without referring to the app), does BeerSmith offer up dilution recommendations? Additionally, did you measure mash ph, or just go with the additions?

I'll definitely keep an eye on this thread and others that include water profiles. 

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2 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

That makes a lot of sense, since you are seeking such low alkalinity. I never really thought of the dilution method to balance out the water. Curious though (and without referring to the app), does BeerSmith offer up dilution recommendations? Additionally, did you measure mash ph, or just go with the additions?

I'll definitely keep an eye on this thread and others that include water profiles. 

 

I'll defer to @Creeps McLane on working with BS3 as my version does not support the Water Profile Tool.  I know from chemistry (haha) that reducing strike water alkalinity will allow the grains to naturally acidify the mash and I have confirmed this using pH paper.  As discussed earlier this week on the Forum, pH paper is not going to be as accurate as a meter, but I'm getting estimated values around 5.5 or so.  That's close enough for me.

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9 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

That makes a lot of sense, since you are seeking such low alkalinity. I never really thought of the dilution method to balance out the water. Curious though (and without referring to the app), does BeerSmith offer up dilution recommendations? Additionally, did you measure mash ph, or just go with the additions?

I'll definitely keep an eye on this thread and others that include water profiles. 

Both these tools are only available on the desktop version along with so many other great tools.  Truly everything is taken care of for you

 

This is the water profile tool.  You can just have one profile or dilute with another to hit a target profile.  Click add salts and they transfer to the recipe youre working on.  So easy you don't even have to think, just do it993531655_ProfileDilution.JPG.9c8847c24e81c0dc18e8f410ad0b208b.JPG

 

Heres the pH screen.  Itll estimate your mash pH but you can also add a lb of acidulated malt or some lactic acid.  The amount of acid is so small I just use malt.519252521_pHtool.thumb.JPG.f57aaac654ace1daee6b15857f7495c6.JPG

 

A pile of dead bodies recipe was not chosen at random... @Big Sarge

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One of these days id really like to sit down, look at my water profile for my area and let that tell me what beer styles i can brew without any adjustments. Milwaukee is home of some great lagers, but i know i dont have the same source as them. As far as I known that is. Im a big fan of using the elements that your supplied. Find styles that fit you water profile and brew beers based on the seasons. No water chemistry, no temp control, wouldnt that be nice???

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3 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

One of these days id really like to sit down, look at my water profile for my area and let that tell me what beer styles i can brew without any adjustments. Milwaukee is home of some great lagers, but i know i dont have the same source as them. As far as I known that is. Im a big fan of using the elements that your supplied. Find styles that fit you water profile and brew beers based on the seasons. No water chemistry, no temp control, wouldnt that be nice???

I agree. It would be nice to find the beers that work well with your local water. Part of me feels like I'm splitting hairs in trying to fine tune water. Don't get me wrong, I'm more than happy with the beer my water has produced. It's also the joy of learning everything I can about brewing. Water is the one element that you have most control over in manufacturing. We rely on the grain, hop, and yeast manufacturers to do their part and do it well. Unless you're growing your own from scratch, water is the only thing we have most control over. All of the advances in the science that improve the other aforementioned elements are what make brewing so easy and forgiving. 

It's all about turning good beer into great beer. 

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35 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

A pile of dead bodies recipe was not chosen at random... @Big Sarge

You make it sound so effortless. I obviously need to try some hands-on application in order to have it make sense to me. 

Nice recipe selection in your example. Now I hear Drowning Pool in my head. 

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17 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I agree. It would be nice to find the beers that work well with your local water. Part of me feels like I'm splitting hairs in trying to fine tune water. Don't get me wrong, I'm more than happy with the beer my water has produced. It's also the joy of learning everything I can about brewing. Water is the one element that you have most control over in manufacturing. We rely on the grain, hop, and yeast manufacturers to do their part and do it well. Unless you're growing your own from scratch, water is the only thing we have most control over. All of the advances in the science that improve the other aforementioned elements are what make brewing so easy and forgiving. 

It's all about turning good beer into great beer. 

Very well said sir

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11 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

Part of me feels like I'm splitting hairs in trying to fine tune water.

I started looking at water chemistry in early 2015 thanks to @Screwy Brewer.  What I learned helped take my beers to the next level be that with clarity, mouthfeel, or taste.   Back then I was doing 5-10 gallon batches and I too started with distilled water.  Before a scheduled brew day, I would literally go to Winco or Safeway to buy jugs of distilled water (wherever it was the cheapest I could find for the quantity needed).  When we moved to this location, I sent a sample of our well water in to be tested and that gave me the baseline.  The first beer I brewed here was to be just a "sample batch" to test the new water and a the additives to see how that batch would turn out (as it is, we were begged for that keg, so it became our first official release on 8/3/17 - #IPA4Life - the same beer we just brewed 56 gallons of this weekend).  It is really amazing how I used to be like "My water is good" and thought that was fine.  Then after reading Screwy's blog posts, that fired me up to read more and more and to give it a shot myself.  "Water" was something I kept putting off learning. I always seemed to be afraid of it for lack of a better way to say it. However, like you said, "water is the only thing we have most control over" and of the 4 main ingredients, that is completely true. 

I tell you what, there is no comparison when it comes to my Porter when I did it straight up vs when adding CaCo3 to the water.  No doubts. Which reminds me, I better find out how much CaCo3 I have, as we are running 60 gallons of Porter (aka "John") next weekend :)

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Great topic and discussion as I'm just starting to learn/pay attention about this as well.

Although I'll have to make that jump to BS v3, Vince aka Screwy Brewer is on another forum I'm in and has a pretty cool cloud based calculator for AG brewers that works great for mobile devices.

https://www.ezhomebrewing.com/ezrecipe/ezRecipe-v1.24.htm

 

However that water profile that @Creeps McLane posted from Beersmith looks to be a must have. Damn, as soon as I think I'm done buying stuff for my brewing, I  find I need more.

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