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Fire Rooster

Temp & Fermentation

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Currently there are two partial mash recipes fermenting in the basement.

Both recipes use US05 yeast, and basement is a constant 59-61 degrees.

 

Towards the end of the 3 week fermentation should the LBKs be moved to

room temperature a few days prior to cold-crashing ?

 

I read somewhere here that it helps clean up the beer ?

 

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First, let's establish the proper temperature range for S-05.  

 

Per Fermentis, the ideal range is 64-82 degrees.  However, this is due to a change in their datasheet (apparently made in 2016 but lagged the change on their website), which was never changed on the package.  If you take a look at my later post in this thread, I refer to that and post a comment they made regarding that.  So, the air temperature in your basement is too cold for ideal fermentation.  With air temp 59-61, when the yeast gets active the temp will increase, and likely be fine.  However, when the fermentation slows, the temp will drop below the ideal range.  Ideally, you'd want to know the temperature of the wort in the LBK, not of the air in the room.  If the temp drops too much, you may experience some Diacetyl, and will want to raise the temp as you suggest to the upper 60s at the end of fermentation.  

 

Let's go one step further.  Your basement air temp, measured ______, is 59-61.  If that's on a wall thermostat, that means the temp near the floor is cooler, as cold air sinks.  Further, if the LBKs are sitting on a cement floor, that's basically a giant cold block.  So that would make things worse.

 

Ideally, you'd want to warm the temp some, or put the LBKs up off the floor.  

 

As to your question about raising them to room temp a few days before cold crashing, no, you don't need to do that.  But, you do need to make sure that your beer thoroughly ferments, and if it's at 59 for a lot of that 3 weeks it may not.  

 

I would not be brewing at those temps without using a hydrometer to check final gravity either.

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I quote from the Safale US-05 package, Temperature range 53.6 F to 77 F, Ideally 59 F to 71.6 F.

It's my understanding fermenting at lower range of yeast is best ?

 

I have a digital temperature gauge right next to LBK.

LBKs are on a 5 feet high shelf, floor would be too cold at 55 F.

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1 hour ago, Fire Rooster said:

Currently there are two partial mash recipes fermenting in the basement.

Both recipes use US05 yeast, and basement is a constant 59-61 degrees.

 

Towards the end of the 3 week fermentation should the LBKs be moved to

room temperature a few days prior to cold-crashing ?

 

I read somewhere here that it helps clean up the beer ?

 

 

That sounds like you're referring to a diacetyl rest.  Those are used for lagers and aren't necessary for ales.

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Fire Rooster,

 

My fermentation chamber does not have the ability to cool based on wort temperature.  I can only cool to an ambient air temperature.  Because I also measure the temperature of my wort during fermentation I have a pretty good idea of what ambient works to get the wort to the proper fermentation temperature.  I set my chamber to 59 or 60 degrees ambient to achieve a fermentation temperature of 62 to 64 degrees for most of my fermentations.  I am using liquid yeast (chico strain) most of the time but occasionally I do use US-05 (dry chico strain).  It ferments perfectly at those temperatures so if your fermentation spot is 59 to 61 you should be fine as well.  Use @RickBeer advice and check with a hydrometer to ensure fermentation has completed.

 

Dawg

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4 minutes ago, Shrike said:

 

That sounds like you're referring to a diacetyl rest.  Those are used for lagers and aren't necessary for ales.

It is a diacetyl rest but it also does help with finishing fermentation.  It is not necessary but it doesn't hurt either.  I always raise my temperature as fermentation finishes by a degree per day until I hit 66 or 67 degrees.  I leave it at that temperature for a few days and then turn off the heat and allow to drop to basement ambient temperature prior to bottling.  I never cold crash (just my preference)

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45 minutes ago, Fire Rooster said:

I quote from the Safale US-05 package, Temperature range 53.6 F to 77 F, Ideally 59 F to 71.6 F.

It's my understanding fermenting at lower range of yeast is best ?

 

I have a digital temperature gauge right next to LBK.

LBKs are on a 5 feet high shelf, floor would be too cold at 55 F.

 

As I was typing my response (early in the AM while drinking my coffee), I didn't notice (and should have) that the Fermentis data sheet has been changed.  Your numbers off the packet are indeed correct.  

 

I started looking into it, and discovered they changed their datasheets some years ago (12/2016), but of course mine and many of the brewing stores are still the old ones.  Stupid to change the datasheet and not change the packet at the same time.  I found a post where someone claimed to have asked Fermentis, and got this answer:

 

Thank you for contacting Fermentis.

I understand the confusion. We did change the temperature range due to a few factors. We have been aware that US-05 ferments better at the elevated temperatures for some time. We wanted to change that, so that people aren’t trying to make pseudo-lagers and struggling with VDK assimilation (Diacetyl). 

The reason that we implemented the change was due to us going through a bit of a rebranding (changing the “Safbrew” strains to “Safale” since they are all ale yeast). There was no change in strain but rather that we know you will have success at the elevated temperatures.

 

So if you go too cold, you in fact will want to raise it up to the higher 60s for a few days.  I use it at 65.  I'm going to modify my initial response.  

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46 minutes ago, Fire Rooster said:

I quote from the Safale US-05 package, Temperature range 53.6 F to 77 F, Ideally 59 F to 71.6 F.

It's my understanding fermenting at lower range of yeast is best ?

 

I have a digital temperature gauge right next to LBK.

LBKs are on a 5 feet high shelf, floor would be too cold at 55 F.

 

If you can, tape the probe for the gauge to the side of the LBK, below the fluid line, with a cloth folded over the tip to shield it from room air.  It will yield a very accurate temperature.

 

Yes, 55 would be very cold.

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Thank you for your responses.

 

2 LBK's will ferment with US-05 yeast @ 59-61 degrees for 2 weeks in basement.

After 2 weeks the LBK's will be moved to the kitchen counter (where I bottle) for one week.

That section of the kitchen counter stays between 66-69 degrees.

 

This sounds to me like a good plan ?

 

I'm not on board with a hydrometer yet, maybe a tilt wireless

hydrometer/temperature floating sensor when/if I do.

 

 

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You have a cold house 😁

 

The most advanced breweries use hydrometers.  Buy 2.  One will break and then the second will try to commit suicide.

 

A hydrometer is like $4.99.

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We like it cool, during winter at night heat is set between 60-62, day 68-71.

Summer time AC is set to 66 at night, 72 for day.

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45 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

You have a cold house 😁

 

The most advanced breweries use hydrometers.  Buy 2.  One will break and then the second will try to commit suicide.

 

A hydrometer is like $4.99.

Hydrometer vs Refractometer ?

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13 minutes ago, Fire Rooster said:

Hydrometer vs Refractometer ?

Hydrometer. 

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Yup.

 

Refractometer can be used before alcohol is created.  After it's created, it's not accurate - but there are sites on how to adjust it. 

 

Big, huge breweries that have very expensive refractometers also use a cheap hydrometer.  

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Thanks, doing my hydrometer homework.

Moved LBK's to kitchen counter, monitored temperature and it's between 61-66.

Location where the LBK's are at is a few degrees cooler than what the heat is set on.

Set the heat on 71 degrees to get to the upper 60's.  SWMBO said "why is it so hot in here ?"

She checked thermostat put in on 68 and said if I was cold to put a sweater on.

I like it cool in the house too, or so I'm being told.

 

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On Monday, December 10, 2018 at 3:43 PM, RickBeer said:

Yup.

 

Refractometer can be used before alcohol is created.  After it's created, it's not accurate - but there are sites on how to adjust it. 

 

Big, huge breweries that have very expensive refractometers also use a cheap hydrometer.  

Since the refractometer only takes a couple drops I use that. When I stop seeing a change in gravity I know we're done and it's time to bottle. At bottling I use the hydrometer for an accurate final reading.

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