Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
ewildcat7

fermenting temperature

Recommended Posts

I have been looking at recipes and they all have a range for the temperature to ferment the wort.  However, I have read both a) that this is the ideal temperature of the wort and b) that this is the ideal temperature of the ambient air around it.  Since I am going to use an inkbird temperature controller for the first time, knowing where to place the probe and which temperature to set is kind of important.  Can anybody help steer me towards how to interpret the temperature in the recipes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ewildcat7 said:

Can anybody help steer me towards how to interpret the temperature in the recipes?

You want the temp of the wort.  The ambient air temp around can be quite different from the wort temp, especially with the heat of fermentation.  Best thing to do with a probe is to attach it to the side of your fermentation vessel (below the wort level), under something thick, like styrofoam.  It’s an easy way to get a pretty accurate reading of the wort temp.  Best way is to have the probe in the wort itself, but that’s not usually the easiest way.  :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I install the tip of my probe under a folded washcloth-sized fabric (actually an old washcloth), folded into quarters.  Make sure the tip is BELOW the level of the liquid in the fermenter, measuring the internal air temperature isn't real helpful.  😉

 

I set mine to 65 degrees for most brews.  Make sure you also set a delay of at least 5 minutes before the compressor comes on.  And, if you provide a heat source, make sure you have enough tolerance built in (I use 0.5 Celsius) so that you're not cooling/heating/cooling/heating constantly. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Make sure you also set a delay of at least 5 minutes before the compressor comes on.

 

I saw that my inkbird has the delay option, but I wasn't sure what it is for.  What is the reason for setting the delay of 5 minutes before the compressor kicks on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To not burn out the compressor.

 

In normal frig / freezer operation, the compressor has a built in delay so that it isn't turning on every time you open the door.  When you use a temp controller, you're cutting juice to the frig/freezer, so that delay feature isn't being used.  Therefore, you want a 5 minute (or longer) delay so that if the temp rises a hair above the threshold, the compressor isn't cycling on too quickly and burning out.  

 

When you open the door, warm air goes in, cold air comes out.  When you close the door, the cold contents, plus the cold coils, put cold back in and the temp may fall back into the acceptable range.  If not, then waiting 5 minutes isn't any issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks Rick

 

One last question - do I need to use the heating side of the inkbird?  Can I just plug in the fridge into the "cool" side and nothing into the "heat" side?  If I do that, should I set the heat temperature to the same as the cooling temperature?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think about it for a minute.  If nothing is plugged into the heating side, what does it matter what the setting is...?

 

As to whether you need it, it depends on the setting in which you are using it.  And, whether you have a heating component.   Is it in a garage in Florida, or a garage in Michigan?  Is it in an environment that's pretty mid 60s anyway?  Do you plan on pitching below fermentation temperatures, so you may want to raise the wort temp a bit until fermentation kicks in?

 

Mine is in my basement.  High 60s / 70 in summer, low 60s in winter.  I made a paint can heater (Google) that I use in the first day or two of fermentation until the yeast kicks in, allows it to maintain 65 plus or minus 0.5 Celsius.  Then I unplug it, because when fermentation ends, I don't care if it drops down to 63, and I don't want it see-sawing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ewildcat7 said:

thanks Rick

 

One last question - do I need to use the heating side of the inkbird?  Can I just plug in the fridge into the "cool" side and nothing into the "heat" side?  If I do that, should I set the heat temperature to the same as the cooling temperature?

I use it both ways. If you have nothing plugged into the heat side just set a large heat variance so the annoying alarm won't go off. I do that for the summer months when nothing plugged into heat side.

 

Winter, since my garage gets cold at night I use a fermentation heater wrap that keeps the temps within a degree of set point on heat side and 2 degrees on the cold side. Works great on my ss fermenter and keeps the whole fridge ambient 1 degree cooler, so I can have my ss fermenter at 65F and an LBK at 64F.

20181220_114630.jpg

20181220_114715.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@RickBeer, "allows i t to maintain 65 plus or minus 0.5 Celsius."? Isn't 65 degrees Celcius +/- 0.5 degrees, just a tad too warm?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My STC-1000 is in Celsius.  I set it for the equivalent of 18.3 degrees celsius, which is 65 degrees fahrenheit .  I set my tolerance for +/- 0.5 degrees Celsius, i.e. 17.8 - 18.8 is the range in which want the frig/freezer running, which is 64 - 65.8 fahrenheit.

 

But you knew that before you asked 😁

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fire Rooster said:

Cato:  What's in your LBK in the picture ?

My first brew using Diablo HME. It's a partial mash with Maris Otter, Carapils, Crystal 40, and 1/2 cup honey. S-05 yeast.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...